Appellate

  • February 20, 2024

    Liberal Justices Hint Chevron Deference Hanging By A Thread

    In the U.S. Supreme Court's latest battle royal over administrative powers, left-leaning justices at oral arguments Tuesday openly suggested that the landmark legal doctrine underpinning modern rulemaking might soon shrivel up, clearing the way for industry-led challenges to regulations on the books for decades.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justices Won't Hear JPMorgan Syndicated Loan Dispute

    The U.S. Supreme Court decided on Tuesdsay that it will not hear a dispute accusing JPMorgan Chase and other banks of failing to warn noteholders about the risks of lending money to a soon-to-be bankrupt company, keeping the case's dismissal intact after the Second Circuit ruled that the syndicated loan at the center of the case was not subject to securities laws.

  • February 20, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Won't Use Roku's Failed IPRs To End Reexams

    The Federal Circuit on Tuesday shot down Ioengine LLC's argument that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office must be stopped from having examiners reconsider its patents, saying the patent owner doesn't need mid-dispute relief.

  • February 20, 2024

    Apple Asks For Discovery Pause During Class Cert. Appeal

    Apple is urging a California federal judge to halt discovery in a sweeping App Store antitrust suit while the company appeals the class certification granted earlier this month.

  • February 20, 2024

    Groups, Scholars Back Tribes In High Court Healthcare Bid

    A coalition of Native American and Alaskan Native healthcare boards and nonprofits are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to uphold rulings that ordered the federal government to reimburse two tribes millions in administrative healthcare costs, arguing that the obligation is deeply rooted in the trust relationship between the United States and its Indigenous nations.

  • February 20, 2024

    2nd Circ. Won't Restore Allergan Investors' Breast Implant Suit

    A Second Circuit panel on Tuesday declined to revive a class action accusing Allergan Ltd. of downplaying cancer risks linked to the company's breast implants, holding in a summary order that the investors failed to show any duty by Allergan to disclose certain information related to the alleged health concerns, or that the company made any false or misleading statements.

  • February 20, 2024

    US Chamber Urges 6th Circ. To Ax FirstEnergy Class Cert.

    The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, former U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission officials and others have urged the Sixth Circuit to reverse class certification in a case accusing FirstEnergy Corp. of committing securities fraud in connection with a multimillion-dollar bribe made to a convicted politician.

  • February 20, 2024

    Fla. Gaming Pact Not Allowed Under Federal Law, Expert Says

    A Miami law school adjunct professor supporting a pair of casinos seeking to undo the Seminole Tribe of Florida's gaming agreement authorizing online sports betting has urged the U.S. Supreme Court to hear the establishments' case or reverse a lower court decision, saying the pact violates the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act.

  • February 20, 2024

    11th Circ. Tosses Appeal Of Bid-Rigging Indictment

    The Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday found that a concrete executive has to wait until after he's tried to contest his indictment by a remotely convened grand jury during the pandemic on charges of allegedly fixing prices and rigging bids for ready-mix concrete in Georgia.

  • February 20, 2024

    5th Circ. Sides With Nickelback In 'Rockstar' Copyright Fight

    The Fifth Circuit on Monday ruled against an artist who claims Canadian rock band Nickelback ripped off his song for its 2005 hit "Rockstar," saying that singing about making lots of money or referencing sports are rockstar clichés and does not show a striking similarity.

  • February 20, 2024

    Colo. Justices Ban Disbarred Atty From Filing Pro Se Actions

    The Colorado Supreme Court on Tuesday banned a disbarred attorney from filing pro se actions in the state, with the justices finding the former lawyer has continued her "vexatious" abuse of state courts despite sanctions and fee awards from multiple trial courts.

  • February 20, 2024

    7th Circ. Backs McDonald's Win Over 'Bad Faith' Hot Tea Suit

    The Seventh Circuit on Tuesday ruled that a lower court correctly tossed a man's $13 million "bad faith" lawsuit alleging he was burned by a McDonald's worker in Illinois who threw hot tea at him.

  • February 20, 2024

    High Court Blocks Bid By 3 States To Join Abortion Drug Case

    Republican attorneys general of three states on Tuesday lost in their attempt to join the U.S. Supreme Court case challenging approval of the abortion medication mifepristone, a potential blow to their efforts to ensure the case isn't dismissed for lack of standing.

  • February 20, 2024

    5th Circ. Seeks Texas Justices' Input On LNG Permit Fight

    The Fifth Circuit has yanked its prior ruling that scrapped an emissions permit issued by Texas environmental regulators for a proposed liquefied natural gas terminal, saying it wants the state's Supreme Court to weigh in on how to define the best available pollution control technology under Texas law.

  • February 20, 2024

    9th Circ. Reinstates Air Traffic Controller's Age Bias Suit

    The Ninth Circuit revived a suit Tuesday from an air traffic controller who said the Federal Aviation Administration passed him over for promotions because of his age, ruling the agency can't hide behind a carveout that allows it to restrict the positions to younger applicants.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ill. Cardiologist Keeps Trial Win In Med Mal Death Suit

    An Illinois state appeals court on Tuesday declined to upend a trial victory for a cardiologist and his employer in a suit alleging he misdiagnosed the severity of a heart condition in a patient who later died, saying the trial court was not wrong to allow certain defense testimony or limit the plaintiff's evidence.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ala. Justices Deem Frozen Embryos Children Under State Law

    The Alabama Supreme Court ruled that frozen embryos count as children in a first-of-its-kind decision bemoaned by advocates and a dissenting judge as potentially ruinous for in vitro fertilization services in the state. 

  • February 20, 2024

    Georgia Attorney Disbarred For Court Lies, Hiding Money

    The Supreme Court of Georgia has stripped an Atlanta-area attorney of her license to practice in the Peach State, ruling the drastic move was appropriate after the lawyer's years of lies to a state court regarding the location of $80,000 tied up in a contract dispute.

  • February 20, 2024

    Jurors' Death Penalty Views Not Tied To Race, Colo. Justices Say

    The Colorado Supreme Court on Tuesday unanimously rejected a Black man's efforts to reverse his 2008 murder conviction for a drive-by shooting, with the justices finding that prosecutors' dismissal of two Black jurors did not amount to improper racial bias.

  • February 20, 2024

    Patent Atty Group Supports Vanda In High Court Patent Case

    The National Association of Patent Practitioners, the American Council of the Blind and other groups have thrown their support behind Vanda's U.S. Supreme Court appeal of decisions invalidating its patents on Hetlioz, a drug for the blind.

  • February 20, 2024

    Eateries' Virus Losses Not Covered, Insurer Tells NC Justices

    Cincinnati Insurance Co. urged the North Carolina Supreme Court to affirm its win in a dispute with more than a dozen eateries over coverage for pandemic-related losses, saying government shutdown orders do not constitute direct physical loss or damage required to trigger coverage.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ga. Justices Clarify Official's Role In Hospital Expansion Law

    The Supreme Court of Georgia has vacated the judgment of the Georgia Court of Appeals in a case concerning the standard that the state's community health commissioner must apply when reviewing a hearing officer's decision over an application to establish a new health service.

  • February 20, 2024

    4th Circ. Orders Redo On Sony's $1B Music Piracy Damages

    Cox Communications Inc. is liable for contributing to copyright infringement against Sony Music Entertainment and others, but a Virginia federal court went too far by applying vicarious liability as well and needs to redo its $1 billion damages determination, the Fourth Circuit ruled Tuesday.

  • February 20, 2024

    Landlord Bias Can Be Eviction Defense, Colo. Justices Say

    The Colorado Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that tenants facing eviction can raise allegations of a landlord's discrimination or retaliation as a defense, directing a trial court to take another look at the case of a woman who accused her landlord of trying to boot her because she refused to have sex with him.

  • February 20, 2024

    Policyholder Attys Say Firm's Mailer Row Merits Coverage

    The North Carolina Supreme Court will hear arguments Wednesday over whether a law firm accused of violating the Driver's Privacy Protection Act by using personal information to market legal services to crash victims is entitled to coverage under an excess policy, as policyholder attorneys anticipate a win for the firm. Here, Law360 breaks down the case in advance of the hearing.

Expert Analysis

  • NY's Revamped Card Surcharge Ban Is Unique Among States

    Author Photo

    Newly revised New York legislation bolsters the state's ban on credit card surcharges, potentially reinvigorating similar laws across the country despite the fact that many of them have been ruled unconstitutional, say Tom Witherspoon and Audrey Carroll at Stinson.

  • How VA Court Change Is Affecting Insurance Disputes

    Author Photo

    The expansion of the Virginia Court of Appeals' jurisdiction to include review of decisions involving insurance coverage stands to significantly grow the body of related case law, likely to the benefit of policyholders, as evident in the recent decision in Bowman II v. State Farm Fire and Casualty Co., say Michael Levine and Olivia Bushman at Hunton.

  • Fed. Circ. Ruling Helps Clarify When Gov't Clawback Is Timely

    Author Photo

    The Federal Circuit’s examination of claims accrual in a January decision that allows the Defense Contract Management Agency to pursue overpayment claims under a cost-reimbursement contract serves as a reminder that the government can lose such claims by waiting too long to file, say Evan Sherwood and Peter Hutt at Covington.

  • Don't Sit On Bankruptcy Sidelines, 5th Circ. Ruling Reminds

    Author Photo

    The Fifth Circuit’s recent In re: Louisiana Pellets decision, holding that a creditor couldn’t assert indemnification defenses in a suit brought by the trustee of a liquidation trust, highlights the risks faced by creditors and other contract parties that choose not to participate in a bankruptcy, say Gregory Hesse and Kaleb Bailey at Hunton.

  • Considering The Logical Extremes Of Your Legal Argument

    Author Photo

    Recent oral arguments in the federal election interference case against former President Donald Trump highlighted the age-old technique of extending an argument to its logical limit — a principle that is still important for attorneys to consider in preparing their cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • How High Court SEC Case Could Affect The ITC

    Author Photo

    While the U.S. Supreme Court’s upcoming ruling in U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission v. Jarkesy will likely spare the U.S. International Trade Commission from major operative changes, the ITC’s ability to issue penalties for violations of its orders may change, say Gwendolyn Tawresey and Ryan Deck at Troutman Pepper.

  • 6th Circ. Ruling Breathes New Life Into Article III Traceability

    Author Photo

    The Sixth Circuit's recent decision in Hardwick v. 3M Co. to vacate a district court's certification of one of the largest class actions in American jurisprudence for lack of Article III standing has potentially broader implications for class action practice in the product liability sphere, particularly in medical monitoring cases involving far-fetched theories of causation, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Will Guide Social Media Account Ownership

    Author Photo

    The Second Circuit’s recent decision in JLM Couture v. Gutman — which held that ownership of social media accounts must be resolved using traditional property law analysis — will guide employers and employees alike in future cases, and underscores the importance of express agreements in establishing ownership of social media accounts, says Joshua Glasgow at Phillips Lytle.

  • Lessons From Rare Post-Verdict Healthcare Fraud Acquittal

    Author Photo

    A Maryland federal court recently overturned a jury verdict that found a doctor guilty of healthcare fraud related to billing levels for COVID-19 tests, providing defense attorneys with potential strategies for obtaining acquittals in similar prosecutions, says attorney Andrew Feldman.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • Debt Collector Compliance Takeaways From An FDCPA Appeal

    Author Photo

    A Consumer Financial Protection Bureau amicus brief last month in an ongoing First Circuit appeal focusing on an interpretation of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act can serve as a reminder for debt collectors to understand how their technologies, like bankruptcy scrubs and letter logic, can prevent litigation, says Justin Bradley at Womble Bond.

  • Takeaways From 9th Circ. Nix Of Ex-GOP Rep.'s Conviction

    Author Photo

    The Ninth Circuit recently reversed the conviction of former Rep. Jeff Fortenberry, R-Neb., for lying to the FBI, showing that the court will rein in aggressive attempts by the government to expand the reach of criminal prosecutions — and deepening a circuit split on an important venue issue, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

    Author Photo

    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • NCAA's Antitrust Litigation History Offers Clues For NIL Case

    Author Photo

    Attorneys at Perkins Coie analyze the NCAA's long history of antitrust litigation to predict how state attorney general claims against NCAA recruiting rules surrounding name, image and likeness discussions will stand up in Tennessee federal court.

  • 3 Administrative Law Lessons From 5th Circ. Appliance Ruling

    Author Photo

    Showing that mundane details can be outcome-determinative, the Fifth Circuit's recent decision in Louisiana v. U.S. Department of Energy — that the government's repeal of rules affecting dishwashers and laundry machines is invalid — highlights the relationship between regulatory actions and statutory language, say Michael Showalter and Vyasa Babu at ArentFox Schiff.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!