Benefits

  • February 28, 2024

    SEC Taps Agency Vet To Lead Adviser, Fund Rulemaking Unit

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission announced Wednesday that an agency veteran currently serving as deputy director of the examinations division will be the new head of its investment management division, which oversees the regulation of investment advisers, mutual funds and certain private fund operators.

  • February 28, 2024

    Musk, Ex-Twitter Staff Fail To Reach Deal In Severance Dispute

    Settlement talks between X Corp., formerly known as Twitter, and a group of former employees have fallen apart, the parties told a Delaware federal judge on Wednesday, asking the judge to lift a stay in their dispute over severance compensation.

  • February 28, 2024

    Tilray Can't Get Exec's $4M Arbitration Award Tossed

    Cannabis company Tilray Brands Inc. can't evade a nearly $4 million arbitration award to a former executive it fired, a federal judge ruled, saying the company's arguments for why the Washington district court should have jurisdiction over a Minnesota arbitration are "wrong on all counts."

  • February 28, 2024

    Save Mart Retirees Add To Nonunion Health Benefits Suit

    Four retirees of a supermarket chain serving California and Nevada added two claims to their proposed Employee Retirement Income Security Act class action against their former employer, telling a California federal judge that Save Mart Supermarkets failed to properly terminate a health care plan for nonunion employees.

  • February 28, 2024

    Pilots Say Airline Shorted Servicemembers' 401(k) Funds

    A discount airline unlawfully failed to contribute to employees' retirement funds when they were on military leave despite repeatedly being told about the oversight by pilots and their union, according to a proposed class action in Minnesota federal court.

  • February 28, 2024

    8th Circ. Axes Federal Mine Agency's Win In Pay Bias Row

    A unanimous Eighth Circuit panel tossed a Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission ruling that a cement company discriminated against a worker by cutting bonuses she was to receive for helping federal inspectors at a mine, saying Wednesday the cut was not motivated by bias.

  • February 27, 2024

    Goldman's $4.6M Exec Compensation Deal OK'd By Chancery

    A Delaware Chancery Court judge on Tuesday approved a settlement deal in a derivative suit against Goldman Sachs Group alleging excessive compensation was paid to nonemployee directors, which includes an agreement by the company to change its compensation practices and reduce executives' pay by an estimated $4.6 million.

  • February 27, 2024

    7th Circ. Won't Disrupt Volvo's Veteran Bias Suit Win

    The Seventh Circuit refused Tuesday to reinstate a U.S. Army veteran's $7.8 million trial win in her long-running case accusing Volvo of firing her over military-related absences and post-traumatic stress disorder, ruling a lower court reasonably concluded that the verdict was tainted by passion and prejudice.

  • February 27, 2024

    Colo. Wants Immediate End To Sick Leave Law Challenge

    The state of Colorado called on a federal court to immediately dismiss an airline lobbying group's challenge to a state sick leave law, arguing that recent precedent established that the law was not preempted by the Airline Deregulation Act.

  • February 27, 2024

    American Airlines Says ESG Doesn't Break Fiduciary Duty

    American Airlines Inc. has asked a Texas federal judge to ground a proposed class action involving environmental, social and governance policies in retirement plans, saying Monday that the plaintiff has no evidence that the airline breached fiduciary duty or that he suffered a loss.

  • February 27, 2024

    Under Armour Can't Slip Consumer-Demand Securities Suit

    A Maryland federal judge denied Under Armour Inc.'s bid to shut down a massive class action alleging that the company misled investors about consumer demand Monday, finding that serious questions remain about the company's public statements.

  • February 27, 2024

    DOL Finalizing ERISA Voluntary Correction Program Changes

    A top official with the U.S. Department of Labor's employee benefits arm said Tuesday that the agency expects to soon finalize changes to a program allowing retirement plan managers to voluntarily self-correct when they fail to forward employee contributions on time or make other transaction errors.

  • February 27, 2024

    Food Co. Gets Inflated ESOP Deal Suit Kicked To Arbitration

    An Illinois federal judge said a worker must arbitrate her suit claiming a food manufacturer sold inflated company shares to its employee stock ownership plan, finding the plan's arbitration agreement allows the business to sidestep an exception blocking some federal benefit law claims from out-of-court resolutions.

  • February 27, 2024

    GOP Lawmakers Press PBGC On $127M Pension Overpay

    The federal agency that bails out failing pension plans gave inadequate answers to two Republican lawmakers' questions about the agency's accidental $127 million overpayment to a Teamsters plan during the coronavirus pandemic, the lawmakers said in a letter to the agency, demanding it send new responses and documents. 

  • February 26, 2024

    Apache's $3B Write-Down Merits Bigger Class, Investors Say

    A group of Apache Corp. investors on the cusp of winning class certification are arguing that their promised class should be extended to encompass even more investors who were allegedly deceived by company promises of a potentially lucrative drilling project that ultimately led to a $3 billion write-down when it went bust. 

  • February 26, 2024

    Chinese Retailer Miniso, Underwriters Beat IPO Suit For Now

    Goldman Sachs, BofA Securities Inc. and a Chinese retailer have secured the dismissal of a class action suit in New York federal court, with a federal judge ruling that the suing investors have failed to identify any actionable misrepresentations or omissions made by the company in connection with its 2020 initial public offering, among other things.

  • February 26, 2024

    UAW, Fiat Chrysler Escape Engineers' Bribery Scheme Suit

    The United Auto Workers, Fiat Chrysler and others are off the hook for state fraud and civil conspiracy claims brought by auto engineers in connection to a bribery scheme between union officials and the automaker, a Michigan federal judge ruled Monday, citing a recent Sixth Circuit decision finding related allegations untimely.

  • February 26, 2024

    Wood Group Prevails In ERISA Fight Over Target-Date Funds

    A California federal judge ruled in favor of an engineering firm and its retirement plan investment manager in a class action from employee 401(k) participants alleging mismanagement, concluding after a nine-day bench trial that a suite of in-house target-date funds offered to retirees were properly selected and monitored.

  • February 26, 2024

    6th Circ. Sanctions Prison Co. For Not Disclosing Asset Info

    A Sixth Circuit panel has held a Federal Bureau of Prisons contractor in contempt for its "woefully inadequate" efforts to turn over financial records to the National Labor Relations Board as ordered, in a dispute over two fired union supporters' back pay.

  • February 26, 2024

    Glass Co. Strikes $5M Deal To End 401(k) Management Suit

    A glass container manufacturer will pay $5 million to resolve a proposed class action alleging it loaded its employee retirement plan with costly and underperforming investment options managed by a formerly affiliated company, according to a filing in Ohio federal court.

  • February 26, 2024

    New York Life To Pay $19M To Settle Retirement Plan Suit

    Current and former New York Life Insurance workers asked a federal court Monday to approve a $19 million deal in a proposed class action alleging the insurance giant unlawfully kept underperforming proprietary investment options in two employee retirement plans.

  • February 26, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Delaware's Court of Chancery dropped two potentially far-reaching decisions last week: one about founder control at Moelis & Co. and another about TripAdvisor's planned move to Nevada. On top of that, there were new cases involving Citrix Systems, Alcoa Corp., BGC Partners Inc. and Cantor Fitzgerald LP.

  • February 26, 2024

    Teamsters Tell 7th Circ. Sysco Must Arbitrate Benefits Dispute

    A Sysco distribution center in Indianapolis must arbitrate its dispute with a Teamsters local over workers' entitlement to early retirement benefits, the union told the Seventh Circuit, arguing the applicable collective bargaining agreement includes a broad arbitration clause.

  • February 26, 2024

    Mich. Judge Vacates Award For Fund's $40M Liability Claim

    An arbitrator must again review a dispute over a union pension fund's claim that a demolition company owed more than $40 million in withdrawal liability, a Michigan federal judge ruled, vacating the arbitration award because evidence didn't back conclusions about the number of labor contracts involved.

  • February 23, 2024

    Restaurants Blast 'Fatal Flaws' In Chicken Price-Fix Deal

    Boston Market and other restaurants objecting to Simmons Foods' $8 million chicken price-fixing settlement with direct purchasers say the Seventh Circuit should unwind the deal because it improperly releases bid-rigging claims for no consideration and turns the massive two-track case on its head.

Expert Analysis

  • Mallory Ruling Leaves Personal Jurisdiction Deeply Unsettled

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    In Mallory v. Norfolk Southern Railway, a closely divided U.S. Supreme Court recently rolled back key aspects of its 2017 opinion in Daimler AG v. Bauman that limited personal jurisdiction, leaving as many questions for businesses as it answers, say John Cerreta and James Rotondo at Day Pitney.

  • What The ESG Divide Means For Insurers And Beyond

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    The debate around ESG is becoming increasingly polarized, with some states passing legislation that prohibits the use of ESG factors and others advancing affirmative legislation, highlighting the importance for insurers and other companies to understand this complex legal landscape, say Scott Seaman and Bessie Daschbach at Hinshaw.

  • 5 Ways Firms Can Rethink Office Design In A Hybrid World

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    As workplaces across the country adapt to flexible work, law firms must prioritize individuality, amenities and technology in office design, says Kristin Cerutti at Nelson Worldwide.

  • Opinion

    Bar Score Is Best Hiring Metric Post-Affirmative Action

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    After the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling striking down affirmative action admissions policies, law firms looking to foster diversity in hiring should view an applicant's Multistate Bar Examination score as the best metric of legal ability — over law school name or GPA, says attorney Alice Griffin.

  • Cos. Must Prepare For More ESG Scrutiny From All Sides

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    As businesses face challenges to their environmental, social and governance efforts and statements — both from those who find them inadequate, and from those who think they go too far — it is more important than ever to proceed with care in implementing and disclosing ESG initiatives, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Recent Changes Mark A Key Moment For New York High Court

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    Recent developments in the New York Court of Appeals — from rapid turnover and increasing diversity, to a perception among some of growing politicization — mark an important turning point, and the court will continue to evolve in the coming year as it considers a number of important cases, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • Ghosting In BigLaw: How To Come Back From Lack Of Feedback

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    Junior associates can feel powerless when senior colleagues cut off contact instead of providing useful feedback, but young attorneys can get back on track by focusing on practical professional development and reexamining their career priorities, says Rachel Patterson at Orrick.

  • New NLRB Bench Book Is An Important Read For Practitioners

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    Though the National Labor Relations Board's Bench Book is aimed at administrative law judges who adjudicate unfair labor practice hearings, key updates in its 2023 edition offer crucial reading for anyone who handles charges before the agency, say David Pryzbylski and Thomas Payne at Barnes & Thornburg.

  • Steps To Success For Senior Associates

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Adriana Paris at Rissman Barrett discusses the increased responsibilities and opportunities that becoming a senior associate brings and what attorneys in this role should prioritize to flourish in this stressful but rewarding next level in their careers.

  • Legal Profession Must Do More For Lawyers With Disabilities

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    At the start of Disability Pride month, Rosalyn Richter at Arnold & Porter looks at why lawyers with disabilities are significantly underrepresented in private practice, asserting that law firms and other employers must do more to conquer the implicit bias that deters attorneys from seeking accommodations.

  • Opinion

    Appellate Funding Disclosure: No Mandate Is Right Choice

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    The Advisory Committee on Appellate Rules' recent decision, forgoing a mandatory disclosure rule for litigation funding in federal appeals, is prudent, as third-party funding is only involved in a minuscule number of federal cases, and courts have ample authority to obtain funding information if necessary, says Stewart Ackerly at Statera Capital.

  • Secure 2.0 Takeaways From DOL's 2024 Budget Proposal

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    The U.S. Department of Labor’s fiscal year 2024 budget proposal provides insight into the most pressing Secure 2.0 implementation issues, including establishment of a search database for finding lost retirement savings and developing guidance on the execution of newly authorized emergency savings accounts, say attorneys at Maynard Nexsen.

  • How Attys Can Avoid Exposing Their Firms To Cyberattacks

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    Attorneys are the weakest link in their firms' cyberdefenses because hackers often exploit the gap between individuals’ work and personal cybersecurity habits, but there are some steps lawyers can take to reduce the risks they create for their employers, say Mark Hurley and Carmine Cicalese at Digital Privacy & Protection.

  • Virginia 'Rocket Docket' Slowdown Is Likely A Blip

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    After being the fastest or second-fastest federal civil trial court for 14 straight years, the Eastern District of Virginia has slid to 18th place, but the rocket docket’s statistical tumble doesn't mean the district no longer maintains a speedy civil docket, says Robert Tata at Hunton.

  • Managing Public Pension Plans During An Election Cycle

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    With the 2024 elections fast approaching, investment advisers managing public pension plan assets must consider political contributions by their personnel in order to ensure compliance with the pay-to-play rule and other statutory, regulatory and contractual requirements, say attorneys at Dechert.

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