Benefits

  • March 21, 2024

    Chemours Faces Investor Suit Over Alleged Exec Misconduct

    Chemical company The Chemours Co. and four of its current and former executives face claims they hurt investors by manipulating a certain financial metric so the executives might receive greater compensation under the company's incentive plans.

  • March 21, 2024

    Sen. Warren Wants SEC To Probe Musk Control Of Tesla Board

    Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., urged the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Thursday to investigate whether Tesla's board of directors is independent from CEO Elon Musk, saying recent reports suggest the billionaire controls the board for his personal benefit.

  • March 21, 2024

    Cigna Slams Suit's Claims Of Algorithm-Led Coverage Denials

    Insurance giant Cigna Group wants a Connecticut federal court to toss a proposed class action alleging that an algorithm unlawfully rejected hundreds of thousands of claims en masse and without a proper review, arguing the suit is based on a "misleading" news article and shows a misunderstanding of the health insurer's claim denial process.

  • March 21, 2024

    6th Circ. Revives McKee's Network Plan Fight With Thrifty Med

    The Sixth Circuit reinstated on Thursday McKee Foods Corp.'s suit against Thrifty MedPlus Pharmacy alleging Tennessee law requiring pharmacy benefit managers to let "any willing pharmacies" participate in a network was preempted by the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, finding that amendments made to the statute didn't render McKee's claims moot.

  • March 21, 2024

    Defendants Cut As Ex-NFL Pros' Benefits Suit Moves Forward

    A Maryland federal judge has let NFL officials off the hook in a lawsuit that alleges the league's disability plan incentivizes doctors to deny claims regardless of evidence, while declining to dismiss the complaint entirely.

  • March 21, 2024

    Healthcare Co. Beats Suit Over TDF Funds' Performance

    A California federal judge granted a win to a healthcare company and its investment adviser in a class action challenging what former workers claim are shoddy target-date-funds included in the company's 401(k) plan, saying the funds at issue performed better than comparable investments.

  • March 21, 2024

    DOL Urges 5th Circ. To Back Biden Admin. ESG Investing Rule

    The U.S. Department of Labor urged the Fifth Circuit on Thursday to uphold a rule allowing retirement advisers to consider social issues such as climate change when choosing investments, arguing that conservative states challenging the rule haven't shown it defies federal benefits law.

  • March 21, 2024

    Plan Admin. Escapes Ex-Aerospace Execs' Death Benefits Suit

    A third-party administrator isn't liable for misrepresentation and negligence claims from former aerospace company executives over death benefits, a Pennsylvania federal judge has ruled, saying the administrator isn't to blame for the plaintiffs' lack of understanding about the termination of a deferred compensation plan.

  • March 21, 2024

    EBSA Gets Level Funding Of $191.1M In Spending Deal

    Spending leaders in the House and Senate agreed Thursday to provide $191.1 million in fiscal year 2024 for the U.S. Department of Labor's sub-agency overseeing employee benefits, a level that's identical to what lawmakers agreed to last fiscal year.

  • March 21, 2024

    Salesforce Can't Ax Vast Class Suit Over 401(k) Management

    Salesforce must face a class action comprising up to 50,000 employees alleging the company allowed its 401(k) plan to be filled with expensive and poorly performing investment options, a California federal judge ruled, finding the workers provided enough evidence to proceed to trial.

  • March 21, 2024

    'Sibling Squabbles' At NJ Law Firm Sent Back To State Court

    A woman formerly employed as an administrator at her sister's New Jersey law firm won her bid to have her suit alleging an anticipatory breach of her retirement plan and retaliatory firing sent back to state court this week.

  • March 21, 2024

    Government Contractor Wants Out Of Exit Pay Suit

    A government contractor said federal law doesn't cover its policy giving employees a bonus upon retirement, but workers lodging a lawsuit against the company weren't eligible for the payments anyway, urging a North Carolina court to toss the suit.

  • March 20, 2024

    Dems Float Bill To Require Earned Paid Leave For Workers

    A Democratic lawmaker from Rhode Island proposed a bill Wednesday that would guarantee U.S. workers the ability to earn at least 10 paid vacation days per year — a move that could extend the benefit to almost 27 million people who lack access to compensated time off.

  • March 20, 2024

    UK Pension Fraud Fund To Pay Out £416M To Victims By 2026

    The U.K.'s pension lifeboat scheme said Wednesday it expects to pay up to £416.7 million ($530 million) in compensation to members of pension schemes that have been hit by scams.

  • March 20, 2024

    Health And Safety Top Risk For Directors, Global Survey Says

    Health and safety is the top risk for directors and officers worldwide, according to a survey published Wednesday, in a "surprise" result partly attributed to the lingering impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on businesses and increasing mental health considerations.

  • March 20, 2024

    SEC Proxy Roundup: Verizon, UPS Escape ESG Proposals

    Verizon and UPS may exclude from their proxy statements shareholder proposals on social policy and climate change matters, according to U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission staff, who also denied various other requests from corporations looking to escape separate social and politics-related proposals.

  • March 20, 2024

    Kirkland, Simpson Rep $1.2B Sale Of Alight's Payroll Biz

    H.I.G. Capital on Wednesday agreed to pay up to $1.2 billion for Alight Inc.'s payroll, professional services and human capital management business, which counts online HR portal Workday among its partners, in an agreement steered by respective legal advisers Kirkland & Ellis and Simpson Thacher.

  • March 20, 2024

    How The Supreme Court Could Narrow Chevron

    After hours of oral argument in a closely watched administrative law case, it appeared that some U.S. Supreme Court justices could be open to limiting the opportunities for lower courts to defer to federal agencies' legal interpretations in disputes over rulemaking — and legal experts said there are a number of ways they could do it.

  • March 20, 2024

    Law360 Announces The Members Of Its 2024 Editorial Boards

    Law360 is pleased to announce the formation of its 2024 Editorial Advisory Boards.

  • March 20, 2024

    US Chamber's Litigation Funding Concerns Spur 2 State Laws

    Amid concerns from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce about third-party litigation funding, including from potentially hostile foreign entities, state legislatures in Indiana and West Virginia have recently passed bills imposing restrictions on the practice.

  • March 19, 2024

    Minn. BCBS Wants Toss Of DOL's $66.8M Tax Liability Suit

    An insurance company is urging a Minnesota federal judge to toss a U.S. Department of Labor suit alleging the company improperly collected at least $66.8 million in state tax liability from plans it administered to pay in-network providers, arguing plans allowed the practice and participants weren't injured.

  • March 19, 2024

    Kellogg Arbitration Pact Is Invalid, 6th Circ. Told In 401(k) Fight

    A former Kellogg Co. employee urged the Sixth Circuit to reinstate his lawsuit accusing the company of up-charging retirement plan participants with excessive fees, saying the case was wrongly booted to arbitration without his consent.

  • March 19, 2024

    NBA Fraudster Dodges Prison After Cooperation, Testimony

    A former NBA shooting guard avoided prison Tuesday for participating in a $5 million retiree healthcare fraud scheme after Manhattan federal prosecutors lauded his assistance and testimony at a trial this past fall.

  • March 19, 2024

    EV Charging Biz Pitches $400K Ch. 11 Staff Retention Plan

    Charge Enterprises Inc., a company that builds electric vehicle charging stations and other infrastructure, has urged a Delaware bankruptcy judge to let it offer about $400,000 in bonuses to keep a dozen employees the firm deemed critical during its Chapter 11 case.

  • March 19, 2024

    Laborers Benefit Funds Ink $2.45M Settlement In Transfer Suit

    Three New York-based asphalt workers are seeking approval of a $2.45 million settlement to their long-running federal class action against two union benefit funds, looking to resolve claims that the funds illegally refused to transfer money to another set of funds.

Expert Analysis

  • A Case For Sharing Mediation Statements With Counterparties

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    In light of a potential growing mediation trend of only submitting statements to the mediator, litigants should think critically about the pros and cons of exchanging statements with opposing parties as it could boost the chances of reaching a settlement, says Arthur Eidelhoch at Eidelhoch Mediation.

  • Challenging Standing In Antitrust Class Actions: Injury-In-Fact

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    As demonstrated in recent cases, the classic injury-in-fact requirement for Article III standing claimed in most antitrust suits is economic harm — and while concrete harm satisfies the requirement, litigants may still be able to challenge whether economic injury has occurred, say Michael Hamburger and Holly Tao at White & Case.

  • Calif. Independent Contractor Lessons From Grubhub Suit

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    California courts have been creating little in the way of clarity when it comes to the employment status of gig workers — and a recent federal court decision in Lawson v. Grubhub illustrates how status may change with the winds of litigation, offering four takeaways for businesses that rely on delivery drivers, say Esra Hudson and Marah Bragdon at Manatt.

  • Preparing For Legal Scrutiny Of Data Retention Policies

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    Two recent cases involving Google and Meta should serve as a call to action for companies to ensure their data retention policies are updated and properly implemented to the degree of being able to withstand judicial scrutiny, especially as more data is generated by emerging technologies, say Jack Kallus and Labeed Choudhry at Kaufman Dolowich.

  • Defending Against Fail-Safe Classes With Rule 23

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    The D.C. Circuit's recent decision in the case of White that there is no stand-alone rule against fail-safe classes deepens an existing circuit split — but defendants can still effectively attack fail-safe class definitions via different procedural arguments based in Rule 23, say Jeffrey Huberman and Andrew Soukup at Covington.

  • Opinion

    Attorneys Should Have An Ethical Duty To Advance DEI

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    National and state bar associations are encouraging attorneys to apply diversity, equity and inclusion practices in the legal profession and beyond, and these associations should take it one step further by formally recognizing ethical duties for attorneys to promote DEI, which could better the legal profession and society, says Elena Mitchell at Moore & Van Allen.

  • Data-Driven Insights Are Key To Attracting Today's Clients

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    As law firm growth slows and competition for clients increases, modern firms must rely on robust data analytics to develop the sector-based expertise and industry insights that clients increasingly prioritize in relationships with counsel, says Lavinia Calvert at Intapp.

  • Ghosting In BigLaw: Why Better Feedback Habits Are Needed

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    Not giving assignments or constructive criticism to junior associates can significantly affect their performance and hours, potentially leading them to leave the firm, but partners can prevent this by asking the right questions and creating a culture of feedback, says Rachel Patterson at Orrick.

  • Rebuttal

    Law Needs A Balance Between Humanism And Formalism

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    A recent Law360 guest article rightly questions the pretextual pseudo-originalism that permits ideology to masquerade as judicial philosophy, but the cure would kill the patient because directness, simplicity and humanness are achievable without renouncing form or sacrificing stare decisis, says Vanessa Kubota at the Arizona Court of Appeals.

  • NFT Tax Guidance Shows IRS Interest In Crypto Enforcement

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    The IRS' first ever guidance addressing the federal income tax treatment of NFTs indicates the agency could take a potentially aggressive stance in enforcing U.S. tax laws in the NFT and crypto spaces, which could have a significant impact on the self-directed IRA market, say attorneys at BakerHostetler.

  • What ACA Preventive Care Ruling Means For Employers

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    Though a Texas federal court's recent ruling in Braidwood v. Becerra paves the way for employers to reimpose cost-sharing requirements on preventive care, companies considering making these changes to their group health and welfare plans should first analyze the financial and social impacts, says Rachel Shim at Holland & Knight.

  • Short Message Data Challenges In E-Discovery

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    As short message platforms increasingly dominate work environments, lawyers face multiple programs, different communication styles and emoji in e-discovery, so they must consider new strategies to adapt their processes, says Cristin Traylor at Relativity.

  • What's Next After High Court Stay On Abortion Pill Ruling

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent stay of a Texas federal court's order invalidating mifepristone's U.S. Food and Drug Administration approvals provides a welcome antidote to the flurry of litigation surrounding the abortion drug, but its ultimate fate hinges on how the Fifth Circuit and Supreme Court will rule on the merits, says Eric Alexander at Reed Smith.

  • Opinion

    Thomas Report Is Final Straw — High Court Needs Ethics Code

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    As a recent report on Justice Clarence Thomas' ongoing conflicts of interest makes evident, Supreme Court justices should be subject to an enforceable and binding code of ethics — like all other federal judges — to maintain the credibility of the institution, says Erica Salmon Byrne at Ethisphere.

  • Structured Settlements In Workers' Comp Cases: A Win-Win

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    With interest rates rising, workers' compensation benefits decrease in price, so structured settlements in personal injury litigation may benefit both injured workers and the employer or carrier, and ultimately help settle complicated cases by bridging the gap between the demand and offer in negotiations, says Julio Martinez at Gilson Daub.

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