Benefits

  • March 21, 2024

    DOL Urges 5th Circ. To Back Biden Admin. ESG Investing Rule

    The U.S. Department of Labor urged the Fifth Circuit on Thursday to uphold a rule allowing retirement advisers to consider social issues such as climate change when choosing investments, arguing that conservative states challenging the rule haven't shown it defies federal benefits law.

  • March 21, 2024

    Plan Admin. Escapes Ex-Aerospace Execs' Death Benefits Suit

    A third-party administrator isn't liable for misrepresentation and negligence claims from former aerospace company executives over death benefits, a Pennsylvania federal judge has ruled, saying the administrator isn't to blame for the plaintiffs' lack of understanding about the termination of a deferred compensation plan.

  • March 21, 2024

    EBSA Gets Level Funding Of $191.1M In Spending Deal

    Spending leaders in the House and Senate agreed Thursday to provide $191.1 million in fiscal year 2024 for the U.S. Department of Labor's sub-agency overseeing employee benefits, a level that's identical to what lawmakers agreed to last fiscal year.

  • March 21, 2024

    Salesforce Can't Ax Vast Class Suit Over 401(k) Management

    Salesforce must face a class action comprising up to 50,000 employees alleging the company allowed its 401(k) plan to be filled with expensive and poorly performing investment options, a California federal judge ruled, finding the workers provided enough evidence to proceed to trial.

  • March 21, 2024

    'Sibling Squabbles' At NJ Law Firm Sent Back To State Court

    A woman formerly employed as an administrator at her sister's New Jersey law firm won her bid to have her suit alleging an anticipatory breach of her retirement plan and retaliatory firing sent back to state court this week.

  • March 21, 2024

    Government Contractor Wants Out Of Exit Pay Suit

    A government contractor said federal law doesn't cover its policy giving employees a bonus upon retirement, but workers lodging a lawsuit against the company weren't eligible for the payments anyway, urging a North Carolina court to toss the suit.

  • March 20, 2024

    Dems Float Bill To Require Earned Paid Leave For Workers

    A Democratic lawmaker from Rhode Island proposed a bill Wednesday that would guarantee U.S. workers the ability to earn at least 10 paid vacation days per year — a move that could extend the benefit to almost 27 million people who lack access to compensated time off.

  • March 20, 2024

    UK Pension Fraud Fund To Pay Out £416M To Victims By 2026

    The U.K.'s pension lifeboat scheme said Wednesday it expects to pay up to £416.7 million ($530 million) in compensation to members of pension schemes that have been hit by scams.

  • March 20, 2024

    Health And Safety Top Risk For Directors, Global Survey Says

    Health and safety is the top risk for directors and officers worldwide, according to a survey published Wednesday, in a "surprise" result partly attributed to the lingering impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on businesses and increasing mental health considerations.

  • March 20, 2024

    SEC Proxy Roundup: Verizon, UPS Escape ESG Proposals

    Verizon and UPS may exclude from their proxy statements shareholder proposals on social policy and climate change matters, according to U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission staff, who also denied various other requests from corporations looking to escape separate social and politics-related proposals.

  • March 20, 2024

    Kirkland, Simpson Rep $1.2B Sale Of Alight's Payroll Biz

    H.I.G. Capital on Wednesday agreed to pay up to $1.2 billion for Alight Inc.'s payroll, professional services and human capital management business, which counts online HR portal Workday among its partners, in an agreement steered by respective legal advisers Kirkland & Ellis and Simpson Thacher.

  • March 20, 2024

    How The Supreme Court Could Narrow Chevron

    After hours of oral argument in a closely watched administrative law case, it appeared that some U.S. Supreme Court justices could be open to limiting the opportunities for lower courts to defer to federal agencies' legal interpretations in disputes over rulemaking — and legal experts said there are a number of ways they could do it.

  • March 20, 2024

    Law360 Announces The Members Of Its 2024 Editorial Boards

    Law360 is pleased to announce the formation of its 2024 Editorial Advisory Boards.

  • March 20, 2024

    US Chamber's Litigation Funding Concerns Spur 2 State Laws

    Amid concerns from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce about third-party litigation funding, including from potentially hostile foreign entities, state legislatures in Indiana and West Virginia have recently passed bills imposing restrictions on the practice.

  • March 19, 2024

    Minn. BCBS Wants Toss Of DOL's $66.8M Tax Liability Suit

    An insurance company is urging a Minnesota federal judge to toss a U.S. Department of Labor suit alleging the company improperly collected at least $66.8 million in state tax liability from plans it administered to pay in-network providers, arguing plans allowed the practice and participants weren't injured.

  • March 19, 2024

    Kellogg Arbitration Pact Is Invalid, 6th Circ. Told In 401(k) Fight

    A former Kellogg Co. employee urged the Sixth Circuit to reinstate his lawsuit accusing the company of up-charging retirement plan participants with excessive fees, saying the case was wrongly booted to arbitration without his consent.

  • March 19, 2024

    NBA Fraudster Dodges Prison After Cooperation, Testimony

    A former NBA shooting guard avoided prison Tuesday for participating in a $5 million retiree healthcare fraud scheme after Manhattan federal prosecutors lauded his assistance and testimony at a trial this past fall.

  • March 19, 2024

    EV Charging Biz Pitches $400K Ch. 11 Staff Retention Plan

    Charge Enterprises Inc., a company that builds electric vehicle charging stations and other infrastructure, has urged a Delaware bankruptcy judge to let it offer about $400,000 in bonuses to keep a dozen employees the firm deemed critical during its Chapter 11 case.

  • March 19, 2024

    Laborers Benefit Funds Ink $2.45M Settlement In Transfer Suit

    Three New York-based asphalt workers are seeking approval of a $2.45 million settlement to their long-running federal class action against two union benefit funds, looking to resolve claims that the funds illegally refused to transfer money to another set of funds.

  • March 18, 2024

    7th Circ. Wants Del. High Court's Input On Stock Shares Row

    The Seventh Circuit on Friday asked Delaware's top court to clarify a ruling it made earlier this year upholding the enforceability of forfeiture-for-competition provisions in limited partnership agreements, saying it found "meaningful differences" between that case and an ex-manager's bid before it to keep the stock sale proceeds he earned before working for a competitor.

  • March 18, 2024

    Leerink Enticed Goldman Exec With False Promises, Suit Says

    An investment banker says she was lured away from a senior position at Goldman Sachs to Boston-based Leerink Partners with what turned out to be a meaningless job title and false promises of guaranteed bonuses, according to a lawsuit filed Monday in Massachusetts state court.

  • March 18, 2024

    Insurer Settles Target Manager's Suit Over Disability Benefits

    An insurance company reached a deal with a Target Corp. manager to end his lawsuit alleging the company unlawfully stopped the disability payments he was receiving to treat his post-traumatic stress disorder stemming from a George Floyd protest, a filing in Wisconsin federal court said.

  • March 18, 2024

    Decline In EBSA Funding May Hurt Mental Health Parity Efforts

    The U.S. Department of Labor's employee benefits arm warned Congress in its latest budget request that it may have to scale back its efforts to implement federal mental health parity laws and the No Surprises Act by 2025.

  • March 18, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Multimillion-dollar e-cigarette settlements, $4 billion in stock buybacks and a $6.1 million appraisal tweak were among the big-dollar items logged in the Delaware Court of Chancery's ledger last week. Also on the docket: a Panama port project, a news outlet's defamation case, drone disputes and a flood of mail from Tesla shareholders. In case you missed it, here's all the latest from the Chancery Court.

  • March 18, 2024

    Hospital Network Let $1B Plan Pay Excessive Fees, Suit Says

    A Northern California hospital network cost workers millions of dollars by failing to leverage the "mammoth" size of its retirement plan to get a better deal on recordkeeping and administrative fees, according to a proposed class action.

Expert Analysis

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

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    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • AI Use May Trigger False Claims Act's Public Disclosure Bar

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    The likely use of publicly available artificial intelligence tools to detect government fraud by combing through large data sets will raise complex questions about a False Claims Act provision that prohibits the filing of claims based on previously disclosed information, say Nick Peterson and Spencer Brooks at Wiley Rein.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

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    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • The Self-Funded Plan's Guide To Gender-Affirming Coverage

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    Self-funded group health plans face complicated legal risks when determining whether to cover gender-affirming health benefits for their transgender participants, so plan sponsors should carefully weigh how federal nondiscrimination laws and state penalties for providing care for trans minors could affect their decision to offer coverage, say Tim Kennedy and Anne Tyler Hall at Hall Benefits Law.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

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    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • How Justices' Disclosure Ruling May Change Corp. Filings

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    In the upcoming Macquarie Infrastructure v. Moab Partners case, the U.S. Supreme Court will resolve a circuit split over whether a company may be sued for private securities fraud if they fail to disclose certain financial information in public filings, which may change the way management analyzes industry risks and trends for investors, says Paul Kisslinger at Lewis Brisbois.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

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    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

  • Series

    Playing In A Rock Cover Band Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Performing in a classic rock cover band has driven me to hone several skills — including focus, organization and networking — that have benefited my professional development, demonstrating that taking time to follow your muse outside of work can be a boon to your career, says Michael Gambro at Cadwalader.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Espinosa On 'Lincoln Lawyer'

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    The murder trials in Netflix’s “The Lincoln Lawyer” illustrate the stark contrast between the ethical high ground that fosters and maintains the criminal justice system's integrity, and the ethical abyss that can undermine it, with an important reminder for all legal practitioners, say Judge Adam Espinosa and Andrew Howard at the Colorado 2nd Judicial District Court.

  • What ESG Investing Ruling Means For Fiduciaries

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    A Texas federal court’s recent ruling — upholding a U.S. Department of Labor rule allowing retirement plan fiduciaries to consider ESG factors in certain investment decisions — provides welcome clarity for plans governed by the Employee Retirement Income Security Act that have long been buffeted by partisan noise and misinformation, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Opinion

    Newman Suspension Shows Need For Judicial Reform

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    The recent suspension of U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman following her alleged refusal to participate in a disability inquiry reveals the need for judicial misconduct reforms to ensure that judges step down when they can no longer serve effectively, says Aliza Shatzman at The Legal Accountability Project.

  • How 2 Cases Could Undermine The Anti-ESG Movement

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    A decision from a federal court in Texas and another case currently making its way through Missouri federal court signal an emerging judicial recognition of the link between environmental, social and governance considerations and maximizing financial returns, say Amy Roy and Robert Skinner at Ropes & Gray.

  • Considerations And Calculations For DOJ Clawback Program

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    The U.S. Department of Justice’s clawback pilot program announced earlier this year presents numerous questions for businesses, and both hypothetical and recent real-world examples capture how companies’ cost-benefit analyses about whether to claw back compensation in exchange for penalty reductions may differ, say Yogesh Bahl and Jonathan Hecht at Resolution Economics.

  • SEC's Life Sciences Actions Utilize Novel Tools And Theories

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    Recent enforcement actions show that the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is employing new forms of data analytics and noteworthy applications of insider trading laws in its scrutiny of fraud within the life sciences and health industries, say Edward Imperatore and Jina Choi at MoFo.

  • How And Why Your Firm Should Implement Fixed-Fee Billing

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    Amid rising burnout in the legal industry and client efforts to curtail spending, pivoting to a fixed-fee billing model may improve client-attorney relationships and offer lawyers financial, logistical and stress relief — while still maintaining profit margins, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

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