California

  • February 23, 2024

    Alec Baldwin Loss Claims Trimmed In 'Rust' Shooting Suit

    A California judge has dismissed with leave to amend loss of consortium claims against Alec Baldwin and El Dorado Pictures Inc. by the family of the cinematographer who was shot and killed on the set of "Rust," saying they had not alleged a close enough relationship to her to sustain the claims under New Mexico law.

  • February 23, 2024

    Greenberg Traurig Adds Real Estate Shareholders In Fla., LA

    Greenberg Traurig LLP has added two shareholders to its global real estate practice, with one attorney based in Florida while the other is based in California and Texas.

  • February 23, 2024

    Staffing Co. To Pay $1.75M, Reclassify Workers In Calif. Deal

    An online shift-booking platform for hotel and restaurant workers will pay $1.75 million to end claims by San Francisco's city attorney and the state of California that it engaged in wage theft by misclassifying thousands of jobs in the hospitality industry, according to court papers. 

  • February 23, 2024

    9th Circ. Won't Rethink Tossed Google $2B Ad Trespass Suit

    The Ninth Circuit said Thursday that it will not reconsider its decision to toss a proposed $2 billion class action against Google that claimed the ubiquitous search engine enriched itself through unauthorized advertising that trampled website owners' property.

  • February 23, 2024

    Vaping Co. Attys Get $86K Fees For Contract Suit Win

    A Los Angeles judge has awarded $86,334 in fees to attorneys for Germany-based Vaping360 GMBH following the company's $821,040 trial win in a contract dispute over website commissions.

  • February 23, 2024

    Haynes Boone Adds Sheppard Mullin Real Estate Pro In Calif.

    Haynes and Boone LLP has continued the expansion of its Orange County office, announcing Thursday it is bringing in its fifth new partner there in the past six months.

  • February 22, 2024

    Great Scott! NBCUniversal Can't Beat DeLorean TM Claim

    NBCUniversal Media cannot escape a trademark infringement claim in a dispute over royalty payments for its use of the iconic DeLorean DMC-12 sports car on "Back to the Future" merchandise, a California federal judge ruled Thursday.

  • February 22, 2024

    Calif. Judges Get Guidance On When To Report Atty Misconduct

    California judges need not always report attorney misconduct to the state bar, according to the latest opinion issued by the California Supreme Court's ethics watchdog on Thursday, advising when judges are compelled to report attorney misdeeds.

  • February 22, 2024

    BofA Card Holders Fight Uphill To Save Interest Charge Suit

    A California federal judge appeared inclined to toss a proposed class action claiming Bank of America illegally imposes excessive interest charges on variable-rate credit card holders, asking during a hearing Thursday if the plaintiff's counsel could "bolster" the complaint if the bank's motion to dismiss were granted.

  • February 22, 2024

    Supertramp Royalties Deal 'Smart Move,' Doors' Manager Says

    The manager of The Doors and Jefferson Airplane testified Thursday in a California federal breach of contract trial between former Supertramp members that the songwriting royalty agreement at the center of the case looks like a "smart move" and that songwriters often share royalty proceeds with non-writing band members.

  • February 22, 2024

    Sanctions Bids By McDonald's, Byron Allen Cos. Look Cooked

    An attorney for McDonald's urged a Los Angeles judge on Thursday to reconsider a tentative ruling denying its motions for sanctions, saying attorneys for Byron Allen's media companies "knowingly" included false information in a complaint alleging the fast food giant lied in pledges to spend more advertising money on Black-owned media.

  • February 22, 2024

    Ex-FBI Source Charged With Biden Bribery Lies Is Rearrested

    The former FBI informant charged with fabricating reports that President Joe Biden and his son took $10 million in bribes from a Ukrainian energy company was rearrested Thursday morning in Las Vegas, as prosecutors fight to undo his bail in the California federal criminal case.

  • February 22, 2024

    Bong Co. Can't Win Against Shop That Didn't Appear In Court

    The maker of Stündenglass-branded glass infusers shouldn't get a win over a retailer that didn't bother to put up a defense against the manufacturer's trademark infringement suit, a federal court recommended, noting that this is at least the fourth time the company's claims against California smoke shop owners has missed the mark when seeking a default judgment.

  • February 22, 2024

    FTC Looks Into Mobile Mini's $3.8B Bid For McGrath RentCorp.

    The Federal Trade Commission wants more information on storage container giant WillScot Mobile Mini's plan to snap up business-to-business storage rental company McGrath RentCorp. for somewhere in the neighborhood of $3.8 billion.

  • February 22, 2024

    BofA Pulling Fast One To Exit Gag Clause Suit, Customers Say

    Consumers suing Bank of America for allegedly trying to stifle consumer critics through clauses in its online service agreements have urged a California federal judge not to toss their suit, arguing the bank's dismissal arguments are without legal merit, factually incorrect and "intended to mislead."

  • February 22, 2024

    Feds Can't Keep Depositions In Family Separation Suit Private

    A California federal judge ruled Thursday that the U.S. government can't keep deposition transcripts private in a lawsuit by families separated at the border during the Trump administration, saying no harm would come from making them public.

  • February 22, 2024

    Latham, Davis Polk Rep As Reddit Files For IPO

    Social media platform Reddit on Thursday formally outlined its plans to go public with a long-rumored initial public offering that's being guided by Latham & Watkins LLP and underwriters' counsel Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP.

  • February 22, 2024

    Grubhub's Business Is 'Suffused With Deception,' LA Says

    Grubhub's business is "suffused with deception," Los Angeles County said in a lawsuit filed Wednesday, claiming the food delivery service has long misled customers about prices and driver benefits and imposed "abusive" policies on restaurants.

  • February 22, 2024

    9th Circ. Urged To Rethink Hiscox Win Due To Hidden Ruling

    A design and marketing company urged the Ninth Circuit on Thursday to review its decision that an insurer didn't have to cover an $850,000 arbitration award to a former CEO over alleged fraud, arguing that the insurer hid the underlying action's judgment that rejected the proposed fraud language.

  • February 22, 2024

    IP Forecast: Samsung Eyes Ex-Attys' Litigation Funder Chats

    Samsung plans to ask a Texas court to force a patent litigation business to disclose communications with litigation funders ahead of a trial next month over whether the tech giant's former in-house counsel stole trade secrets. Here's a look at that case — plus all the other major intellectual property matters on deck in the coming week.

  • February 22, 2024

    Almond Grower's Early Ch. 11 Motions Get Wary OK

    A California bankruptcy judge gave cautious approval to a series of first day motions in the Chapter 11 case of almond grower Trinitas Farming LLC Thursday, saying he was wary of green lighting an interim debtor-in-possession order before a final credit agreement or a committee of unsecured creditors is in place.

  • February 22, 2024

    US Can't Appeal Order To Give Avenatti's Tax Info To Trustee

    A California federal judge declined Wednesday to allow the U.S. to appeal a bankruptcy court's decision ordering Michael Avenatti's tax returns to be released to the trustee overseeing the estate of Eagan Avenatti LLP's bankruptcy, finding the decision to be unappealable, and Avenatti himself hasn't objected to the disclosure.

  • February 22, 2024

    'Gullible' Lender Wins $2.8M Judgment Against Cannabis Co.

    A businessman who pitched opening a "lucrative cannabis operation" to a lender must pay back the $2.8 million borrowed, a Los Angeles County judge ruled, saying the entrepreneur took "advantage of" the financier's "lack of business sophistication."

  • February 22, 2024

    YouTube Privacy Judge 'Flummoxed' By Kids' Liability Theory

    A California federal judge indicated Thursday that she's open to trimming a revived proposed class action alleging Google and companies that host child-friendly YouTube channels illegally collected children's data from targeted ads, expressing concerns about the requested relief and saying she's "flummoxed" by the consumers' belated liability theory against the channels' owners.

  • February 22, 2024

    Hertz Sued Over Policy Limiting Options For Disabled Drivers

    Two customers hit Hertz with a proposed class action Thursday in California federal court, alleging that the car rental company discriminates against people with disabilities by reducing the number of vehicles in its fleet that can be operated with hand controls.

Expert Analysis

  • Preparing For A New Wave Of Litigation Under Silicosis Rules

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    After the Division of Occupational Safety and Health of California issued an emergency temporary standard to combat noncompliance with assessments of workers' exposure to particles of crystalline silica, companies that manufacture, distribute or sell silica-containing products will need aggressive case-specific discovery to navigate a new wave of litigation, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • A Key Tool For Calif. Policyholders With Nonadmitted Insurers

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    As insurers increasingly flee California and residents of the Golden State are forced to insure their properties with nonadmitted insurers, it is crucial to understand the Unauthorized Insurers Process Act, a critical but underutilized tool for policyholders, say Keith Meyer and Kya Coletta at Reed Smith.

  • Opinion

    Gilead Ruling Signals That Innovating Can Lead To Liability

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    A California appeals court's ruling last month in Gilead Life Sciences v. Superior Court of San Francisco that a drug manufacturer can be held liable for delaying the introduction of an improved version of its medication raises concerns about the chilling effects that expansive product liability claims may have on innovation, says Gary Myers at the University of Missouri School of Law.

  • Vagueness In Calif. Climate Law Makes Compliance Tricky

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    California's recently enacted Voluntary Carbon Market Disclosures Act requires companies making claims of carbon neutrality, or significant greenhouse gas emissions reductions, to disclose information supporting those claims — but vague and conflicting language in the statute poses multiple problems for businesses, say John Rousakis and Chris Bowman at O'Melveny.

  • Grant Compliance Takeaways From Ga. Tech's FCA Settlement

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    Georgia Tech’s recent False Claims Act settlement over its failure to detect compliance shortcomings in a grant program was unique in that it involved a voluntary repayment of funds prior to the resolution, offering a few key lessons for universities receiving research funding from the government, says Jonathan Porter at Husch Blackwell.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • Potential Defendant Strategies Amid Calif. Privacy Questions

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    Although the current case law surrounding the California Consumer Privacy Act is in its infancy, courts have begun addressing important issues related to the notice-and-cure provisions of the statute, and these decisions show defendant-businesses would be wise to assert their notice rights early and repeatedly, say Viola Trebicka and Dan Humphrey at Quinn Emanuel.

  • Deferral Pointers For Employers After $700M Ohtani Deal

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    Darren Goodman and Christine Osvald-Mruz at Lowenstein Sandler examine the legal consequences of Shohei Ohtani's $700 million, 10-year contract with the Los Angeles Dodgers — a high-profile example of nonqualified deferred compensation — and offer lessons for employers of all sizes interested in similar deals.

  • High Court Case Could Reshape Local Development Fees

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    If last month's oral arguments are any indication of how the U.S. Supreme Court will rule in Sheetz v. County of El Dorado, it's unlikely the justices will hold that the essential nexus and rough proportionality tests under the cases of Nollan, Dolan and Koontz apply to legislative exactions, but a sweeping decision would still be the natural progression in the line of cases giving property owners takings claims, says Phillip Babich at Reed Smith.

  • Employer Lessons From Nixed Calif. Arbitration Agreement

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    A California state appeals court’s recent decision to throw out an otherwise valid arbitration agreement, where an employee claimed a confusing electronic signature system led her to agree to unfair terms, should alert employers to scrutinize any waivers or signing procedures that may appear to unconscionably favor the company, say Guillermo Tello and Monique Eginli at Clark Hill.

  • How Poor Governance, Weak Contracts Harm Cannabis Cos.

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    Decades into cannabis decriminalization and legalization, many companies in the industry still operate on a handshake basis or fail to keep even minimally required records, which can have devastating effects and lead to costly, business-killing litigation, says Griffen Thorne at Harris Bricken.

  • EEO-1 Ruling May Affect Other Gov't Agency Disclosures

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    By tightly construing a rarely litigated but frequently asserted term, a California federal court’s ruling that the Freedom of Information Act does not exempt reports to the U.S. Department of Labor on workplace demographics could expand the range of government contractor information susceptible to public disclosure, says John Zabriskie at Foley & Lardner.

  • What Retailers Should Note In Calif. Web Tracking Suits

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    As retailers face a deluge of class actions alleging the use of conventional web analytic tools violate wiretapping and eavesdropping provisions of the California Invasion of Privacy Act, uncovering the path toward a narrow interpretation of the law will largely depend on how these cases proceed, say Matthew Pearson and Kareem Salem at BakerHostetler.

  • Copyright Lessons Following Ruling In Artist AI Suit

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    The recent California district court ruling in Andersen v. Stability AI — that artists needed to specify how the training of artificial intelligence tools violated their copyrights — shows that lawyers on either side of generative AI matters must carefully navigate copyright issues including temporary copying and data sourcing, says Carlos Araya at Magnolia Abogados.

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