Class Action

  • February 14, 2024

    Pfizer Reaches $93M Deal With Lipitor Buyers In Antitrust MDL

    Pfizer Inc. has agreed to shell out $93 million to put to rest Lipitor buyers' claims in sprawling antitrust multidistrict litigation over the cholesterol medication that stretches back more than a decade, according to a motion filed Wednesday in New Jersey federal court.

  • February 14, 2024

    Visa Says $5B Swipe Fee Deal Blocks Intuit, Square Claims

    Visa and Mastercard have asked a New York federal court to throw out antitrust claims brought by Intuit and Square, arguing that their claims were released as part of the $5.6 billion class action settlement the credit card companies finalized with merchants last year.

  • February 14, 2024

    9th Circ. Open To Rebooting Suit Over Apple App Crypto Theft

    A Ninth Circuit panel appeared open Wednesday to reviving a putative class action alleging Apple misrepresented the safety of its App Store after users' cryptocurrency was stolen from an app, with two judges questioning why the allegations can't survive when Apple has consistently touted its security in separate antitrust litigation.

  • February 14, 2024

    ​​​​​​​Google's Use Of User Data Quotas Draws 9th Circ. Analogies

    A Ninth Circuit panel Wednesday struggled to find an apt analogy for a property claim made by Android users alleging in a proposed class action that Google illegally uses their purchased data allotments to transmit information back to the company, comparing the intangible data to electricity or an annuity, among other hypotheticals.

  • February 14, 2024

    'Addictive' Tinder, Hinge Apps Break Hearts, V-Day Suit Says

    Match Group intentionally designs its Tinder and Hinge dating apps to be addictive in order to lock users into a "perpetual pay-to-play loop," prioritizing profits over its marketing promises of helping people make romantic connections, according to a proposed class action filed in California federal court on Valentine's Day.

  • February 14, 2024

    Alcon Can't Dodge Suit Over Eye Drops' '30 Day Supply' Claim

    Alcon Laboratories can't escape a proposed class action alleging it falsely claims that its Pataday eye drops have a "30 Day Supply," after a New York federal judge said Wednesday that reasonable consumers could understand the label as assuring that the product, if used as directed, would last 30 days.

  • February 14, 2024

    Honda, Ford Push For Review Of New Wireless IP

    Honda is urging U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Director Kathi Vidal to vacate the Patent Trial and Appeal Board's decision not to review a Neo Wireless patent it had challenged, the same day Ford did the same.

  • February 14, 2024

    Prudential Inks $35M Deal Over Investor's Stock-Drop Suit

    A Prudential Financial Inc. investor asked a New Jersey federal judge on Wednesday to sign off on a $35 million deal to settle allegations the insurer hid mortality trends and understated its life insurance reserves, causing its stock to trade at inflated prices.

  • February 14, 2024

    Legal Org. Backs Lyft In Supreme Court PAGA Fight

    Representative and individual claims brought under California's Private Attorneys General Act are inseparable when it comes to arbitration, a legal organization told the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday, backing Lyft's challenge to a California state appellate court's decision preserving a former driver's representative claims.

  • February 14, 2024

    Mo. Hospital Faces Action Over Breach Of 500K Patients' Data

    A Missouri hospital has been hit with a proposed class action after allegedly taking five months to notify more than 500,000 patients that their sensitive information had been compromised, according to a complaint filed in Missouri federal court.

  • February 14, 2024

    San Francisco's Ankle Monitor Rules Put On Hold

    A federal judge in California has halted the San Francisco Sheriff's Office from enforcing rules that forced criminal defendants released pretrial under electronic monitoring to agree to be subjected to warrantless and suspicionless searches at any time and allow their GPS data to be shared among law enforcement agencies, court documents show.

  • February 14, 2024

    Mondelez Sued Over Ritz Bits Sandwiches 'Real Cheese' Claim

    Mondelez Global was hit with a proposed class action on Wednesday in New York federal court by a customer alleging the snack food giant falsely advertises that its Ritz Bits cracker sandwiches are made with real cheese when the filling's main ingredient is whey.

  • February 14, 2024

    Investors Urge Prison As Developers Seek More Briefing Time

    Two real estate developers on Wednesday asked for more time to respond to EB-5 investors' request that they be imprisoned for hiding their money instead of paying overdue settlements and sanctions judgments, telling an Illinois federal judge their attorney wrote down the court's deadline incorrectly.

  • February 14, 2024

    Google 'Lockbox' Program Hid App Tracking, 9th Circ. Told

    Counsel for a group of Android phone users urged the Ninth Circuit on Wednesday to revive a proposed class action alleging that Google's "Lockbox" program secretly collected information about Android owners' non-Google app use, saying the tech giant's privacy policy on the data collection was ambiguous at best.

  • February 14, 2024

    Del. Justices Mull Reviving $500M Maxim Merger Suit

    Former shareholders of circuit maker Maxim Integrated Products Inc. told Delaware's top court Wednesday the investors weren't fully informed when they approved a $21 billion merger with Analog Devices Inc. that also cut off a $500 million, four-quarter string of dividends.

  • February 14, 2024

    Capital One Accused Of Hiding Savings Account Changes

    Capital One concealed from existing account holders that it offered new customers superior high-yield savings account options while also cutting interest rates on older accounts to reap financial benefits, according to a proposed class action filed Wednesday in California federal court.

  • February 14, 2024

    Insurer Needn't Defend Landlord From Antitrust MDL

    A Washington state judge has ruled in favor of an insurer in a coverage dispute revolving around nearly 40 antitrust class action claims against landlords that have been combined into a multidistrict litigation case, finding that the insurer owes no defense coverage to an accused property manager.

  • February 14, 2024

    Google, Apple Users Ask 9th Circ. To Revive Video Data Fight

    Google and Apple consumers urged the Ninth Circuit Wednesday to revive separate proposed class actions alleging that the tech giants violated New York and Minnesota state statutes by unlawfully retaining personally identifiable information collected in connection with video streaming rentals, arguing both statutes create a private right of action.

  • February 14, 2024

    Software Co. Inks $4M Deal In Privacy Suit Over Breached Info

    Patients suing software company Connexin Software for allegedly failing to safeguard the healthcare and personal identifiable information of more than 200,000 people compromised during a data breach, including that of children, asked a Pennsylvania federal judge on Wednesday to approve a $4 million class settlement.

  • February 14, 2024

    Westell, Shareholders Reach $2.2M Deal In Stock-Split Suit

    Westell Technologies Inc. shareholders challenging a type of stock split engineered by the company told Delaware's Court of Chancery that they have agreed to settle their claims for $2.2 million and plan to request attorney fees of no more than $550,000.

  • February 14, 2024

    NHL, Junior Leagues Accused Of Exploitation In Antitrust Suit

    The National Hockey League and three independent but affiliated junior leagues are accused of systematically exploiting teenage players and immersing them in a culture of "economic, physical, psychological, and sexual" abuse as part of their development, according to a putative federal antitrust class action filed in New York Wednesday.

  • February 14, 2024

    Chicago Eatery Biz Exec's Bid For Atty Privilege Challenged

    Investors in Chicago restaurant Maple & Ash told an Illinois court that a principal at the eatery's management firm wrongly acted as a lawyer in their corporate theft lawsuit against the firm, saying he inappropriately seeks to assert attorney-client privilege over 6,000 documents in the suit.

  • February 14, 2024

    Va. Farms Settle H-2A Workers' Allegations Of OT Violations

    A wage dispute lodged by two Mexican farmworkers who accused a Virginia agricultural association and two farms of cheating them and other temporary agricultural workers out of over $2.5 million in overtime pay is now settled, the parties said Wednesday.

  • February 14, 2024

    French-Door Fridge Buyers Sue Whirlpool Over Broken Panels

    Refrigerator buyers claim Whirlpool Corp. designed its french-door fridges in such a way that causes the front-facing ice and water control panel to become totally useless, often resulting in an expensive repair or the consumer buying a new one, according to a complaint filed in Delaware federal court.

  • February 14, 2024

    Drug Co. Paratek's Officers Sued In Del. Over $462M Sale

    Former stockholders of drug developer Paratek Pharmaceuticals Inc. have sued five directors and officers in Delaware's Court of Chancery, accusing those named of slow-walking company sale efforts and snubbing up to 50% higher offers in favor of a $462 million deal that allegedly assured the directors and officers maximum benefits.

Expert Analysis

  • What 3rd Circ. Gets Wrong About Arbitration Enforcement

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    The Third Circuit and other courts should correct their current law, exemplified by the Third Circuit's recent decision in Henry v. Wilmington Trust, requiring a motion to dismiss based on an arbitration clause because it conflicts with the Federal Arbitration Act, the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, and — with regard to the improper-venue approach — U.S. Supreme Court precedent, says David Cinotti at Pashman Stein.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • The Key To Defending Multistate Collective FLSA Claims

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    Federal circuit courts are split on the reach of a court's jurisdiction over out-of-state employers in Fair Labor Standards Act collective actions, but until the U.S. Supreme Court agrees to review the question, multistate employers should be aware of a potential case-changing defense, say Matthew Disbrow and Michael Dauphinais at Honigman.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • The Shifting Landscape Of Securities Class Action Fees

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    An analysis of recently settled cases shows that in addition to the settlement size, plaintiffs counsel in securities class actions appear to be rewarded for good settlement outcomes relative to a statistical prediction, with certain outcomes for the motion to dismiss and motion for class certification also affecting attorney fees awarded, says Edward Flores at NERA Economic Consulting.

  • Aviation Watch: Pilots Face Mental Health Catch-22

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    The recent case of an Alaska Airlines pilot who attempted to crash an airliner in flight highlights the dilemma facing federally licensed cockpit personnel who need psychological help, yet could lose their jobs if they seek it — but a long-running program may provide a solution, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • 7 Critical Copyright And AI Questions Courts Need To Address

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    U.S. courts have yet to rule on many copyright issues regarding generative artificial intelligence technologies, so developers and users should consider several questions when evaluating risks, developing risk mitigation plans and making decisions about particular use cases, say John Delaney and Sean West at Perkins Coie.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • Opinion

    Activist Short-Sellers Are The Dark Knights Of Wall Street

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    While so-called activist short-sellers have been subject to increased scrutiny in recent years, these investors work in the shadows like Batman to expose fraud on Wall Street, often generating leads that may move regulators to take action, say attorneys at Labaton Sucharow.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

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    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

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    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

  • And Now A Word From The Panel: Tracking MDL Geography

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    In recent years, the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation has predominantly selected states east of the Mississippi River as venues for new MDLs — but with half of the proceedings it has created in recent months venued in Arizona and California, the panel is not neglecting the western part of the country, says Alan Rothman at Sidley.

  • Understanding Discovery Obligations In Era Of Generative AI

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Attorneys and businesses must adapt to the unique discovery challenges presented by generative artificial intelligence, such as chatbot content and prompts, while upholding the principles of fairness, transparency and compliance with legal obligations in federal civil litigation, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

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