Colorado

  • February 22, 2024

    YouTube Privacy Judge 'Flummoxed' By Kids' Liability Theory

    A California federal judge indicated Thursday that she's open to trimming a revived proposed class action alleging Google and companies that host child-friendly YouTube channels illegally collected children's data from targeted ads, expressing concerns about the requested relief and saying she's "flummoxed" by the consumers' belated liability theory against the channels' owners.

  • February 22, 2024

    Law Grad With Disabilities Wins Extra Time On Bar Exam

    A Colorado state judge has ordered the state's lawyer licensing authority to give a recent law school graduate with visual impairments and ADHD extra time to take the bar exam next week, finding the test-taker was likely to prove he needs the 50% time extension.

  • February 22, 2024

    Wash. AG Can't Go It Alone Against Kroger Merger, Cos. Say

    Kroger and Albertsons have urged a judge to toss Washington state's "go-it-alone" bid to block their $24.6 billion merger deal, arguing the anti-competitive concerns raised by the state's attorney general are not a nationwide antitrust issue.

  • February 22, 2024

    Brazilian Heiress' Daughter Can't Escape Colo. Collection Suit

    The daughter of a Brazilian heiress must face claims that she stashed money for her mom to avoid a nearly $20 million court judgment, after a Colorado state judge said a creditor has alleged enough signs of fraud for the allegations to proceed.

  • February 21, 2024

    Judges Doubt Surgery Center Co. Can Undo Contract Loss

    Colorado appellate judges were skeptical Wednesday that a surgery center company could unwind a jury's verdict that it breached a contract with a management services firm because jurors never heard that poor performance could justify canceling the deal, noting that the jury ultimately disagreed that the management company was at fault.

  • February 21, 2024

    Judge Suggests EV-Maker Investor Suit Too Vague To Survive

    A Colorado federal magistrate judge has recommended the dismissal of a shareholder suit against commercial electric vehicle company Lightning eMotors, finding the shareholders failed to bring specific allegations that the company knowingly misled investors on matters like its production capacity and its business relationship with Amazon.

  • February 21, 2024

    MLB Wants Out Of Ex-Scouts' Colorado Age Bias

    Major League Baseball took another swing at dismissing a proposed age discrimination class action filed by several former scouts Tuesday, stressing that the vast majority of the suit has no place in Colorado federal court.

  • February 21, 2024

    Police Immunity Hinges On Whether Silent Siren Led To Injury

    The Colorado Supreme Court has ruled that a police officer can be held liable if failure to use sirens or emergency lights while pursuing a suspect may have contributed to a person's injuries.

  • February 21, 2024

    Messner Reeves Accused Of Losing Client's $700K Deposit

    Colorado-based Messner Reeves LLP is being sued in California state court by a Florida financing consultant that claims the firm failed to protect a $700,000 interest deposit it made as part of a client's business loan.

  • February 20, 2024

    Colo. Justices Ban Disbarred Atty From Filing Pro Se Actions

    The Colorado Supreme Court on Tuesday banned a disbarred attorney from filing pro se actions in the state, with the justices finding the former lawyer has continued her "vexatious" abuse of state courts despite sanctions and fee awards from multiple trial courts.

  • February 20, 2024

    Jurors' Death Penalty Views Not Tied To Race, Colo. Justices Say

    The Colorado Supreme Court on Tuesday unanimously rejected a Black man's efforts to reverse his 2008 murder conviction for a drive-by shooting, with the justices finding that prosecutors' dismissal of two Black jurors did not amount to improper racial bias.

  • February 20, 2024

    Biotech Co. SomaLogic, Former Exec Settle Fight Over Stock

    Colorado-based biotechnology company SomaLogic Inc. and a former co-founder of a company it purchased in 2022 have resolved a lawsuit over the executive's departure and the fate of 400,000 unvested shares, with a California federal judge dismissing the case for good on Friday.

  • February 20, 2024

    Landlord Bias Can Be Eviction Defense, Colo. Justices Say

    The Colorado Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that tenants facing eviction can raise allegations of a landlord's discrimination or retaliation as a defense, directing a trial court to take another look at the case of a woman who accused her landlord of trying to boot her because she refused to have sex with him.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justices Won't Touch UBH Mental Health Coverage Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined Tuesday to hear United Behavioral Health's challenge to a Tenth Circuit decision that found the company violated federal benefits law by refusing to cover a teenage girl's inpatient mental health treatment claims.

  • February 16, 2024

    State Farm 'Bad Deal' Can't Save Policyholders' Suit

    The Tenth Circuit on Friday refused to revive a proposed class action accusing State Farm of illegally denying full uninsured motorist coverage for policyholders, relatives and passengers, saying that the insurer may have sold them a "bad deal" but that they agreed to it.

  • February 16, 2024

    The Congressman Who Reps Cannabis Reform On Capitol Hill

    Rep. Earl Blumenauer speaks to Law360 about the prospects for Congress enacting marijuana reform, why he supports moving cannabis to Schedule III and some of the drug policy triumphs and setbacks in his home state of Oregon.

  • February 16, 2024

    Colo. Must Guard Against Unfair Bar Exam Asks, Official Says

    A high-ranking Colorado official on Friday told a state judge in Denver that the state lawyer licensing authority must deny accommodation requests from bar applicants who don't have proper documentation in order to avoid anyone getting an undue advantage on the exam.

  • February 16, 2024

    Switchblade Seller Sues Atty Over Police Raid Advice

    An online switchblade seller in Colorado has accused his former attorney of failing to tell him he could sue the government to try to recover inventory taken during a law enforcement raid involving state and federal authorities.

  • February 16, 2024

    NCAA, Hoopster Settle Dispute Over Betting Suspension

    The NCAA has settled a lawsuit brought by a Rutgers University basketball player who sued the organization earlier this month over claims it was trying to make him live out a punishment for sports betting violations that he had already served while a student-athlete at Iowa State University.

  • February 16, 2024

    Vail Resorts Promotes Deputy GC To Top Lawyer

    Vail Resorts Inc. has elevated one of its in-house attorneys to general counsel, as its top lawyer leaves the mountain ski resort operator.

  • February 15, 2024

    Rental Car Cos. Can Be Held Liable As Insurers In Colo.

    Rental car companies that sell insurance policies can be on the hook for bad faith claims, a Colorado Court of Appeals panel ruled Thursday in a published opinion, concluding that a trial court wrongfully dismissed a bad faith, breach of contract suit against Hertz based on the erroneous finding that it was not an insurer.  

  • February 15, 2024

    AGs Press FDA On Safeguards Against Metal In Baby Food

    Attorneys general from states across the country urged the U.S. Food and Drug Administration once again on Thursday to establish requirements that baby food producers test for lead and other metals in products headed for store shelves, citing a recent wave of childhood lead poisoning connected to recalled applesauce pouches.  

  • February 15, 2024

    Colo. Consumer Protection Claims Can Live Sans Class

    A Colorado appellate panel concluded Thursday that a plaintiff who asserts a class claim under the Colorado Consumer Protection Act but does not secure class certification can still pursue an individual claim.

  • February 15, 2024

    Colo. Cannabis Co. Says It Was Stiffed On $1.4M Seed Bill

    A Colorado-based supplier of feminized cannabis seeds is claiming that an Oregon farming company and the private investment bank that backed it have skipped out on a $1.4 million bill, according to a complaint filed in Boulder County District Court.

  • February 15, 2024

    What Rescheduling Pot Would Mean For Criminal Justice Reform

    While federal drug enforcers mull a recommendation from health regulators to loosen restrictions on marijuana, criminal justice reformers are warning that rescheduling the drug would not realize President Joe Biden's campaign promise to decriminalize marijuana.

Expert Analysis

  • A Midyear Look At How AI Is Affecting Lawyers

    Author Photo

    The past six months have been a notable period for advancements in artificial intelligence and generative AI, and as we head into the second half of the year, we must review the implications that AI has for the legal industry, including how lawyers will be advising clients on use of AI technology, says Natasha Allen at Foley & Lardner.

  • Flawed Analysis Supports Common Law Tax Deficiency Ruling

    Author Photo

    The Colorado federal district court’s recent decision in Liberty Global, holding that the U.S. Department of Justice may assert a common law tax claim without the notice of tax deficiency required by the Internal Revenue Code, relies on a contorted reading of the statute and irrelevant case law, say Loren Opper and Christie Galinski at Miller Canfield.

  • NY, Minn. Set Pace For Employee Breastfeeding Protections

    Author Photo

    Breastfeeding employees have gotten increased legal protections through recently effective amendments in New York and Minnesota, and the laws underline the need for employers to watch for state-level legislative efforts to extend these protections beyond federal requirements, say John Litchfield and Miranda Curtis at Foley & Lardner.

  • Opinion

    Bar Score Is Best Hiring Metric Post-Affirmative Action

    Author Photo

    After the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling striking down affirmative action admissions policies, law firms looking to foster diversity in hiring should view an applicant's Multistate Bar Examination score as the best metric of legal ability — over law school name or GPA, says attorney Alice Griffin.

  • Ghosting In BigLaw: How To Come Back From Lack Of Feedback

    Author Photo

    Junior associates can feel powerless when senior colleagues cut off contact instead of providing useful feedback, but young attorneys can get back on track by focusing on practical professional development and reexamining their career priorities, says Rachel Patterson at Orrick.

  • Justices Complicate TM Enforcement, But Options Remain

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Abitron v. Hetronic that federal trademark law cannot be applied to foreign conduct makes trademark protection more difficult, but a majority concurring opinion that teeters on siding with the minority may hint at alternative enforcement routes, says Richard Stockton at Banner Witcoff.

  • Opinion

    States Must Fight Predatory Real Estate Listing Agreements

    Author Photo

    As momentum against long-term real estate listing agreements continues to grow, states should take action to render existing agreements unenforceable and discourage future unfair and deceptive trade practices in real estate, says Elizabeth Blosser at the American Land Title Association.

  • The Differing Court Approaches To Pay Equity Questions

    Author Photo

    Employers face the tough task of navigating an increasingly complex patchwork of pay equity laws and court interpretations, say attorneys at Hunton.

  • Steps To Success For Senior Associates

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    Adriana Paris at Rissman Barrett discusses the increased responsibilities and opportunities that becoming a senior associate brings and what attorneys in this role should prioritize to flourish in this stressful but rewarding next level in their careers.

  • How To Avoid A Zombie Office Building Apocalypse

    Author Photo

    With national office vacancy rates approaching 20%, policymakers, investors and developers will need to come together in order to prevent this troubling trend from sucking the life out of business districts or contaminating the broader real estate market, say Ryan Sommers and Robyn Minter Smyers at Thompson Hine.

  • Legal Profession Must Do More For Lawyers With Disabilities

    Author Photo

    At the start of Disability Pride month, Rosalyn Richter at Arnold & Porter looks at why lawyers with disabilities are significantly underrepresented in private practice, asserting that law firms and other employers must do more to conquer the implicit bias that deters attorneys from seeking accommodations.

  • Insurance Considerations For State Biometric Privacy Claims

    Author Photo

    As Connecticut and Colorado join the growing number of states that have enacted biometric data privacy acts auguring significant damages, in-house counsel thinking about insurance coverage for privacy liability should consider several key factors including clarity of exclusions, say Peter Halprin and Tae Andrews at Pasich.

  • Case Law Is Mixed On D&O Coverage For Gov't Investigations

    Author Photo

    As the Fourth Circuit’s recent decision in Brown Goldstein v. Federal Insurance Co. demonstrates, federal appeals courts take different approaches to determine whether government investigations are covered by directors and officers liability insurance, so companies and individuals must review their policy language, say Chloe Law, Jan Larson and Caroline Meneau at Jenner & Block.

  • NBA Players Must Avoid Legal Fouls In CBD Deals

    Author Photo

    The NBA’s recently ratified collective bargaining agreement allows athletes to promote CBD brands and products, but athletes and the companies they promote must be cautious of a complex patchwork of applicable state laws and federal regulators’ approach to advertising claims, says Airina Rodrigues at Brownstein Hyatt.

  • How Attys Can Avoid Exposing Their Firms To Cyberattacks

    Author Photo

    Attorneys are the weakest link in their firms' cyberdefenses because hackers often exploit the gap between individuals’ work and personal cybersecurity habits, but there are some steps lawyers can take to reduce the risks they create for their employers, say Mark Hurley and Carmine Cicalese at Digital Privacy & Protection.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Colorado archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!