Colorado

  • March 15, 2024

    Jury Hands Colo. Sportscaster Air Ball In Kroenke Bias Suit

    A Colorado federal jury has rejected a Hispanic sportscaster's claims of discrimination against pro sports empire Kroenke Sports & Entertainment in a suit alleging his former employers farmed out his duties to white coworkers and demoted him due to his race, age and substance-use disability.

  • March 15, 2024

    Trade Secret Cases Are Up As Clients Eye Patent Alternatives

    Trade secret litigation has seen a gradual increase over the past decade, driven by the promise of substantial damages awards, a new federal law, and frustration over the challenges of patent litigation, according to intellectual property attorneys.

  • March 14, 2024

    Denver DA Settles Ex-Deputy's Gender Pay Discrimination Suit

    The Office of the Denver District Attorney has settled a Colorado state court lawsuit with one of its former prosecutors, who alleged she was paid less than her male colleagues in similar roles, and the office disclosed Thursday it agreed to pay the attorney $7,500 to resolve the dispute.

  • March 14, 2024

    Colo. Surgery Center Can't Undo Contract Breach Verdict

    A Colorado appellate panel saw no reason to disturb a jury's half-million-dollar verdict finding a surgery center breached a contract with a management firm and failed to pay for work outside the contract, concluding that even if jurors got the wrong instructions, they wouldn't have made a different decision.

  • March 14, 2024

    Backers Of Colo. Wolf Release Can Defend State's Plan

    Defenders of Wildlife and other conservation groups can participate in a lawsuit seeking to block the further reintroduction of gray wolves into the state of Colorado, after a federal judge on Thursday said the groups have different interests from government agencies defending decisions related to the plan.

  • March 14, 2024

    Colorado Truckers Too Few, Too Local For Class Treatment

    A group of truck drivers who allege they were denied adequate overtime or meal and rest breaks cannot pursue their claims as a unified class, as a Colorado federal judge ruled that they were too few in number and too easy to contact to justify consolidation.

  • March 14, 2024

    Colo. Magistrate Judges Tell Attys To Load Up Their Dockets

    A group of federal magistrate judges for the District of Colorado told a room of attorneys Wednesday not to dismiss them as the "junior varsity bench," urging lawyers to take advantage of their expertise in a district where the latest newly appointed district judges all served as magistrate judges first.

  • March 14, 2024

    NFL Had Ample Cause To Deny Disability Benefits, Court Says

    A Texas federal judge has tossed a former NFL player's suit against the league for denying him permanent disability benefits, following the recommendation from a magistrate judge who determined that, although injuries ultimately ended his football career, eight different doctors had said he was capable of working.

  • March 14, 2024

    Most States Fall Short In Disclosing Justices' Finance Reports

    The vast majority of state supreme courts make it exceedingly difficult for the public to get information about justices' financial entanglements, and the information they do give out is often scant at best, according to a report released Thursday.

  • March 13, 2024

    Jury Awards Photog $3.1M In Licensing Fight Against Otter

    A Colorado federal jury has said a California photographer is entitled to about $3.1 million in a copyright suit after finding that cellphone case maker Otter Products LLC wrongly copied various images.

  • March 13, 2024

    EPA Designates First Navajo Nation Superfund Site

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is adding the Lukachukai Mountains Mining District in northeastern Arizona to its National Priorities List, with the district's uranium mining waste piles marking the first designated Superfund site on the Navajo Nation.

  • March 13, 2024

    Colo. Justices Doubt Amazon's Math For Holiday Incentives

    Several Colorado Supreme Court justices were skeptical Wednesday about Amazon's claim that it can exclude extra holiday wages from workers' overtime payouts, asking what the company didn't understand about a state requirement to include "all compensation" in its overtime calculations.

  • March 13, 2024

    Colo. Fees Are Really Taxes, Conservative Group Tells Judge

    Colorado's upcoming fees on retail deliveries, short-term vehicle rentals and ride-hailing services violate the state Taxpayer's Bill of Rights and other provisions in state law, a conservative group has told a state judge in seeking a trial.

  • March 13, 2024

    Fla. Restaurateur Says Seller Broke $7.3M Colo. Home Deal

    A Miami restaurateur is suing an Aspen family trust for allegedly pulling out of a deal for him to buy a $7.3 million property in the Colorado mountain town, claiming they had no right to terminate the deal over their failure to obtain a demolition permit.

  • March 12, 2024

    Suncor Deal With Colo. Over Air Monitoring Gets Judge's OK

    A Colorado state judge has approved a settlement agreement between Suncor and state air regulators over air quality monitoring around the oil and gas company's refinery near Denver.

  • March 12, 2024

    Colo. Justices Fret Over Victimized Judges' Bias

    Colorado Supreme Court justices seemed leery Tuesday of reversing a judge who refused to recuse herself in a criminal case after revealing she was the victim of a similar crime, with justices seeking to balance the specter of forced recusals with the erosion of defendants' due process rights.

  • March 12, 2024

    Startup Founder's Attys Come 'Very Close' To More Sanctions

    A Colorado federal judge has said a geothermal startup founder's arguments for why one of his attorneys should not be sanctioned for discovery violations were "preposterous" and warned his lawyers that they came "very close" to being penalized again.

  • March 12, 2024

    Crocs Can't Poke Holes Through IP Defamation Case

    A Colorado federal judge has refused to grant the bulk of Crocs' bid to toss a suit from a Canadian company that settled a patent dispute with the footwear maker, but agreed to trim the case by one count.

  • March 12, 2024

    Colo. Cannabis Brands Hit With $5.5M Creditor Suit

    BellRock, the cannabis company behind brands such as Mary's Medicinals and Dixie, was hit with a lawsuit seeking $5.5 million in defaulted loans, weeks after the company announced its chief executive's departure and that it is considering restructuring debt.

  • March 12, 2024

    $20M Coal Lease Judgment Should Stand, 10th Circ. Hears

    A coal company on Monday urged the Tenth Circuit not to disturb a $20 million judgment it was awarded in a Wyoming lease dispute over the calculation of advance royalty payments, saying the lower court got it right.

  • March 12, 2024

    Colo. Lawmakers OK Multistate Online Insurance Tax Filing

    Insurance companies in Colorado would be required to pay some taxes through a multistate third-party online application under legislation approved by the state Senate.

  • March 12, 2024

    Detroit Tigers Say Age Bias Suit Should Be Thrown Out

    The Detroit Tigers urged a Michigan federal court to throw out a suit from two former scouts who said they were fired as part of a systemic push to get rid of older employees, saying both men are included in a similar proposed class action in Colorado.

  • March 11, 2024

    Gov't Says Cost Trumps Return In Dish Spectrum Fraud Case

    The U.S. Department of Justice asked a federal judge to dismiss a suit accusing Dish Network of trying to buy discounted spectrum through sham companies, saying the plaintiff hasn't shown that Dish hid its interest in the buyers and the companies never received Federal Communications Commission bidding credits anyway.

  • March 11, 2024

    Google Search Judge Wary Of NYT Bid To Make Docs Public

    The D.C. federal judge weighing the fate of Google's search business pushed back during a Monday hearing on the New York Times' bid for a large scale unsealing of key contracts at the heart of the Justice Department antitrust lawsuit, although he left any final decisions for another day.

  • March 11, 2024

    Judge OKs Eye Care Tech Co.'s $8M DIP Request

    A Texas bankruptcy judge on Monday approved optometry software company Eye Care Leaders Portfolio Holdings LLC's request to draw on the remainder of its $8 million in debtor-in-possession funds for its Chapter 11 case, saying the company had given good reason to believe it was poised for a rewarding auction.

Expert Analysis

  • 3 Abortion Enforcement Takeaways 1 Year After Dobbs

    Author Photo

    A year after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned the constitutional right to abortion in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, confusion continues to abound amid the quagmire of state-level enforcement risks, federal efforts to protect reproductive health care, and fights over geolocation data, say Elena Quattrone and Sarah Hall at Epstein Becker.

  • Pay Transparency Laws Complicate Foreign Labor Cert.

    Author Photo

    State and local laws adopted to help close the gender pay gap pose challenges for U.S. companies recruiting foreign nationals, as they try to navigate a thicket of pay transparency laws without running afoul of federally regulated recruitment practices, say Stephanie Pimentel and Asha George at Berry Appleman.

  • Rethinking In-Office Attendance For Associate Retention

    Author Photo

    The hybrid office attendance model doesn't work for all employees, but it does for many — and balancing these two groups is important for associate retention and maintaining a BigLaw firm culture that supports all attorneys, says Summer Eberhard at Major Lindsey.

  • Opinion

    ALI, Bar Groups Need More Defense Engagement For Balance

    Author Photo

    The American Law Institute and state bar committees have a special role in the development of the law — but if they do not do a better job of including attorneys from the defense bar, they will come to be viewed as special interest advocacy groups, says Mark Behrens at Shook Hardy.

  • Murdaugh Trials Offer Law Firms Fraud Prevention Reminders

    Author Photo

    As the fraud case against Alex Murdaugh continues to play out, the evidence and narrative presented at his murder trial earlier this year may provide lessons for law firms on implementing robust internal controls that can detect and prevent similar kinds of fraud, say Travis Casner and Helga Zauner at Weaver and Tidwell.

  • Post-Siegel Trustee Fee Rulings Further Debtor-Friendly Trend

    Author Photo

    One year after the U.S. Supreme Court’s bankruptcy ruling in Siegel v. Fitzgerald left the matter of trustee fee refunds open to lower courts, related rulings have sided with debtors, reminding practitioners of the importance of the constitutional backdrop to statutory law, say Daniel Lowenthal and Jonah Wacholder at Patterson Belknap.

  • Firm Tips For Helping New Lawyers Succeed Post-Pandemic

    Author Photo

    Ten steps can help firms significantly enhance the experience of attorneys who started their careers in the coronavirus pandemic era, including facilitating opportunities for cross-firm connection, which can ultimately help build momentum for business development, says Lana Manganiello at Equinox Strategy Partners.

  • Prepping Your Business Ahead Of Affirmative Action Ruling

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's upcoming ruling on whether race should play a role in college admissions could potentially end affirmative action, and companies will need a considered approach to these circumstances that protects their brand power and future profits, and be prepared to answer tough questions, say Nadine Blackburn at United Minds and Eric Blankenbaker at Weber Shandwick.

  • Tackling Judge-Shopping Concerns While Honoring Localism

    Author Photo

    As the debate continues over judge-shopping and case assignments in federal court, policymakers should look to a hybrid model that preserves the benefits of localism for those cases that warrant it, while preventing the appearance of judge-shopping for cases of a more national or widespread character, says Joshua Sohn at the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • State NIL Laws Aim To Shield Colleges That Defy NCAA

    Author Photo

    The recent passage of name, image and likeness laws in several states, permitting universities to insert themselves into student-athletes' NIL deals despite prohibitions from the National Collegiate Athletic Association, reveals a pattern of greater protections for universities against potential NCAA enforcement action, say Christina Stylianou and Gregg Clifton at Lewis Brisbois.

  • Perspectives

    How Attorneys Can Help Combat Anti-Asian Hate

    Author Photo

    Amid an exponential increase in violence against Asian American and Pacific Islander communities, unique obstacles stand in the way of accountability and justice — but lawyers can effect powerful change by raising awareness, offering legal representation, advocating for victims’ rights and more, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • Opinion

    Congress Needs To Enact A Federal Anti-SLAPP Statute

    Author Photo

    Although many states have passed statutes meant to prevent individuals or entities from filing strategic lawsuits against public participation, other states have not, so it's time for Congress to enact a federal statute to ensure that free speech and petitioning rights are uniformly protected nationwide in federal court, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Legal Pitfalls To Watch For When Advertising Psychedelics

    Author Photo

    As psychedelic products and related therapeutic services make their way into the mainstream, companies engaged in creating or publishing ads for such products and services should consider several legal implications on federal, state and local levels, says Dorian Thomas at Frankfurt Kurnit.

  • ERISA Ruling Shows Why Insurers Must Justify Claim Denials

    Author Photo

    The Tenth Circuit's recent decision in D.K. v. United Behavioral Health imposed a long-overdue measure of accountability on health insurers by holding that Employee Retirement Income Security Act compliance requires responding to the medical opinions of the beneficiary's treating doctors before denying claims, says Mark DeBofsky at DeBofsky Law.

  • Some Client Speculations On AI And The Law Firm Biz Model

    Author Photo

    Generative artificial intelligence technologies will put pressure on the business of law as it is structured currently, but clients may end up with more price certainty for legal services, and lawyers may spend more time being lawyers, says Jonathan Cole at Melody Capital.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Colorado archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!