Colorado

  • February 02, 2024

    Colo. Judge Rejects State GOP Bid To Close Primary Election

    A Colorado federal judge on Friday ruled that voters unaffiliated with a political party can participate in the Republican primary election in June, denying the state Republican party's bid to block the state from running a semi-open primary.

  • February 02, 2024

    NCAA Hoopster Reinstated As Judge Questions Transfer Rule

    A New Jersey federal judge late Friday reinstated a Rutgers basketball player whom the NCAA had suspended for 15 games, ruling that the organization cannot keep him off the court using a now prohibited transfer eligibility rule and that he had shown that doing so would cause him irreparable harm.

  • February 02, 2024

    Colo. Regulators Say Landlords Too Vague In GHG Rule Suit

    Colorado regulators urged a Denver judge to toss an apartment industry group's claim that new greenhouse gas reduction rules for large buildings would impair its ability to honor contracts, arguing that the group has lodged the sweeping claim without specifics.

  • February 02, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Donald Trump's Disqualification

    The U.S. Supreme Court will hold oral arguments in a special session Thursday to consider former President Donald Trump's bid to be reinstated to the Colorado primary election ballot.

  • February 02, 2024

    Colo. Firm Says Texas Rival Is Encroaching On 'Strong Arm' Turf

    A prominent Colorado personal injury firm has sued a Texas-based personal injury firm in Denver District Court for allegedly violating an agreement to only use the phrase "the strong arm" for marketing in Texas.

  • February 02, 2024

    Bipartisan Bill Would Add Judgeships In Colorado And Idaho

    A new bipartisan bill would add two additional district judgeships in Colorado and one in Idaho in an attempt to expedite cases in the growing states' increasingly burdened courts.

  • February 01, 2024

    Colo. Climate Case May Be Stuck In 'Catch-22,' Judge Says

    A Colorado state judge asked Exxon on Thursday whether its argument would put local governments seeking to hold it responsible for the effects of climate change in a "Catch-22," since the oil giant maintains that its emissions were too widespread to be subject to state law while federal law doesn't give the plaintiffs an opportunity to sue.

  • February 01, 2024

    Denver Man Accused Of Romancing Women Into $121K Scam

    A Denver resident scammed at least $121,000 from women he met on dating apps and at gyms by promising massive returns on investments in a fake medical treatment project, according to a lawsuit filed in state court by Colorado's securities regulator on Wednesday.

  • February 01, 2024

    10th Circ. Absolves App For Fake Car Sale That Turned Deadly

    The Tenth Circuit on Thursday affirmed the dismissal of a lawsuit leveled against an online marketplace provider over the murder of a couple by a man pretending to be selling a car on its platform, finding the case didn't show how the app caused or increased risk to users.

  • February 01, 2024

    Ex-Nursing Head Drops Retaliation Suit Against Colo. Hospice

    A former nursing director and the hospice care company she accused of firing her in retaliation for using Family and Medical Leave Act leave have ended their dispute, according to a stipulation of dismissal filed in Colorado federal court.

  • February 01, 2024

    Publicis Reaches $350M Opioid Settlement With All 50 States

    Publicis Health LLC settled a lawsuit on Thursday with all 50 U.S. states, the District of Columbia, and several U.S. territories for $350 million over claims that it helped exacerbate the opioid crisis through its work with Purdue Pharma, the manufacturer behind OxyContin.

  • February 01, 2024

    Colo. Judge Trims Travel Nurses' 'Bait And Switch' Suit

    A Colorado federal judge cut several claims from a group of travel nurses' proposed class action alleging two staffing companies did a "bait and switch" and slashed their wages after hiring them, ruling they could not bring breach of contract claims because they were at-will employees.

  • January 31, 2024

    Ex-NFL Player, Reptile Co. Can't Toss Worker's Sex Abuse Suit

    A Colorado state judge rejected ex-NFL player Chadwick Brown's bid to toss claims that he sexually abused the now-former controller for his reptile shipping company, finding that she sufficiently alleged the former linebacker caused her severe emotional distress.

  • January 31, 2024

    Colo. Judge Won't Rule Out Back Pay In Truck Driver ADA Suit

    A Colorado federal judge said he would not prevent the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission from seeking back pay on a claim that a trucking company's return-to-work policy had a disparate impact on disabled employees, finding in an order Wednesday that the company's request "would be unjust and border on absurd."

  • January 31, 2024

    Data Breach Victims Say Health Software Cos. Can't Ax Claims

    A proposed class of people whose personal medical information was stolen from a Colorado software company have told a federal judge they've done enough to show that the company and its owner failed to safeguard their data, arguing they should now proceed to discovery in the case.

  • January 31, 2024

    Texas Company Sues Cybersecurity Firm For Infringement

    A Texas company says Colorado-based cybersecurity company Acronis SCS Inc. has made and sold multiple products that infringe a pair of its patents relating to information tracking, according to a suit filed Wednesday in Colorado federal court.

  • January 31, 2024

    Hacked Atty Regains Email Access After Triggering Mistrial

    A defense attorney for a marketing manager accused of working with fraudsters told a Colorado federal court that she has regained email access but is still working through a hacking incident that triggered a mistrial, according to a notice seeking a quick retrial in the criminal fraud case. 

  • January 30, 2024

    Trump Camp Says Lawyers' Protections Beat Defamation Suit

    The Trump campaign on Tuesday said a Colorado appellate panel should throw out a defamation suit against it by a former Dominion Voting Systems executive because comments made by Sidney Powell and Rudy Guiliani and others were protected by litigation privilege, a position it said was bolstered by a recent state high court decision protecting lawyers' public statements.

  • January 30, 2024

    Palestinian Groups Should Face Terror Suits, US Says

    The federal government has told the Tenth Circuit that terrorism victims should be able to sue the Palestinian Authority and Palestine Liberation Organization because the entities had "reasonable" notice of a 2019 law that would subject them to U.S. jurisdiction.

  • January 30, 2024

    Trader Joe's Supplier Wins Contract Claim Over Bony Birds

    A Washington federal judge ruled on Tuesday that a poultry supplier breached its contract by selling a Trader Joe's chicken burger manufacturer a "boneless" shipment that contained bone fragments, while ruling that a jury should decide other issues in the supply chain suit, including whether the batch was wrongly characterized as "breast trim."

  • January 30, 2024

    Missing Clearance Dooms Protest Over $57M Navy Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has tossed a protest over an option issued under a $56.9 million task order for Navy parachute training, saying that the protester's lack of a required security clearance meant the challenge was effectively futile.

  • January 30, 2024

    Colo. Pizzeria Says Insurer Owes More Fire Coverage

    A Colorado pizzeria that was damaged by a fire in 2021 told a Colorado federal court its insurer still owes coverage for business losses and other expenses, arguing that the insurer is in part to blame for the restaurant being unable to complete its restorations required by its policy.

  • January 30, 2024

    Colo. Bill Seeks Tax Credit For Mortgage Rate Buy-Downs

    Colorado would allow an income tax credit for home sellers who finance mortgage rate buy-downs for the buyers of a property under a bill introduced in the state House of Representatives.

  • January 30, 2024

    Colo. Man Says He Was Denied Bar Exam Accommodations

    The Colorado Supreme Court Office of Attorney Regulation Counsel was sued in Colorado state court by a man who alleges he was denied disability accommodations during multiple attempts at taking the Uniform Bar Exam.

  • January 30, 2024

    Colo. Worker Says Pa. Staffing Agency Shorted Wages

    A Pennsylvania staffing agency has been underpaying its Colorado workers, slashing overtime wages by paying them only for their scheduled hours rather than hours they worked and rounding their time sheets to the nearest full hour, according to a proposed class action in Pennsylvania state court.

Expert Analysis

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

    Author Photo

    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

  • 3 AI Regulation Developments Insurers Must Follow

    Author Photo

    Insurance regulators continue to actively develop regulations and guidance on the use of artificial intelligence, so insurers should be aware of recent developments from the Colorado Division of Insurance, the National Association of Insurance Commissioners and the New York Department of Financial Services, say attorneys at Willkie.

  • Understanding Discovery Obligations In Era Of Generative AI

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    Attorneys and businesses must adapt to the unique discovery challenges presented by generative artificial intelligence, such as chatbot content and prompts, while upholding the principles of fairness, transparency and compliance with legal obligations in federal civil litigation, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • How Mental Health Ruling Paves Road For Equal Coverage

    Author Photo

    The Tenth Circuit’s recent ruling in E.W. v. Health Net, which clarified the pleading requirements necessary to establish a Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act violation, is a win for plaintiffs as it opens the door to those who have been denied coverage for behavioral health treatment to prove a mental health parity violation, says Mark DeBofsky at DeBofsky Law.

  • An Overview Of Circuit Courts' Interlocutory Motion Standards

    Author Photo

    The Federal Arbitration Act allows litigants to file an immediate appeal from an order declining to enforce an arbitration agreement, but the circuit courts differ on the specific requirements for the underlying order as well as which motion must be filed, as demonstrated in several 2023 decisions, says Kristen Mueller at Mueller Law.

  • The Case For Post-Bar Clerk Training Programs At Law Firms

    Author Photo

    In today's competitive legal hiring market, an intentionally designed training program for law school graduates awaiting bar admission can be an effective way of creating a pipeline of qualified candidates, says Brent Daub at Gilson Daub.

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

    Author Photo

    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

    Author Photo

    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • How Legal Teams Can Prep For Life Sciences' Tech Revolution

    Author Photo

    The life sciences and health care industries are uniquely positioned to take advantage of new efficiencies created by cloud computing and generative artificial intelligence, but the sensitivity of their data also demands careful navigation of an expanding legislative and regulatory landscape, say Kristi Gedid, Zack Laplante and Lisa LaMotta at Ernst & Young.

  • What To Expect After Colo. Nixes Special Standing Rules

    Author Photo

    Two recent Colorado Supreme Court decisions have abandoned a test to preclude standing in lawsuits challenging government decisions brought by subordinate government entities, which will likely lead to an admixture of results, including opening the door to additional legal challenges between government entities, says John Crisham at Crisham & Holman.

  • Preparing Law Students For A New, AI-Assisted Legal World

    Author Photo

    As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the legal landscape, law schools must integrate technology and curricula that address AI’s innate challenges — from ethics to data security — to help students stay ahead of the curve, say Daniel Garrie at Law & Forensics, Ryan Abbott at JAMS and Karen Silverman at Cantellus Group.

  • General Counsel Need Data Literacy To Keep Up With AI

    Author Photo

    With the rise of accessible and powerful generative artificial intelligence solutions, it is imperative for general counsel to understand the use and application of data for myriad important activities, from evaluating the e-discovery process to monitoring compliance analytics and more, says Colin Levy at Malbek.

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

    Author Photo

    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

    Author Photo

    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

    Author Photo

    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Colorado archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!