Colorado

  • January 29, 2024

    Early Designs For Road Project Naturally Flawed, Jury Hears

    A construction design firm told a Colorado federal jury Monday that it's being sued for nearly $260 million because its initial design of a Denver-area highway expansion had the sort of deficiencies to be expected in such an early pass.

  • January 29, 2024

    Accused Crypto Pastor 'Preyed' On His Flock, Judge Says

    A Colorado state judge Monday extended an asset freeze against a social media pastor who appeared to confess online to an alleged scheme to defraud congregants with worthless cryptocurrency, with the judge calling it a "case of unmitigated greed."

  • January 29, 2024

    Colo. Water District Suit Says Base Contaminated Supply

    A water district serving about 6,500 customers near Colorado Springs claims the Peterson Space Force Base contaminated its water supply by using aqueous film forming foams containing PFAS chemicals for decades, despite knowing the dangers they posed.

  • January 29, 2024

    Colo. Justices To Rule On Whether OT Includes Holiday Pay

    The Colorado Supreme Court will weigh in on a wage dispute between Amazon and a group of warehouse workers by clarifying whether employers are obligated under state wage law to factor higher holiday rates of pay into workers' regular rate.

  • January 29, 2024

    Holland & Hart Adds Immigration Trio From Ogletree In Denver

    Holland & Hart LLP has expanded its immigration team in Colorado with three attorneys from Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC, the firm said on Monday.

  • January 29, 2024

    Colo. Atty Censured For Threatening Fellow Phish Fan Lawyer

    A presiding disciplinary judge censured a Colorado attorney who had accused a fellow lawyer of shoving concertgoers while naked at a Phish concert and had threatened in a profanity-laced letter to bring federal claims if he did not pay $50,000.

  • January 29, 2024

    EPA Wrongly Approved Flawed Colo. Air Plan, 10th Circ. Told

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency unlawfully approved Colorado's air pollution control plan despite its containing too many exemptions for the oil and gas industry, an environmental group has told the Tenth Circuit.

  • January 29, 2024

    Judge Asked To Rethink Split Class Cert. In HomeAdvisor Suit

    A putative class of service professionals alleging that HomeAdvisor Inc. and other companies engaged in deceptive business practices urged a Colorado federal judge to reconsider their rejected class certification bid.

  • January 29, 2024

    EEOC Can't Junk Jury Verdict In Trucking Co. ADA Suit

    A Colorado federal judge declined to overturn a trucking company's win in a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit that accused it of unlawfully blocking some workers from returning from medical leave, saying the agency failed to sway a jury.

  • January 26, 2024

    Enviro Group Launches New Bid To Block Colo. Water Project

    A Colorado environmental group has asked a federal judge to toss approval by the Army Corps of Engineers of a major water pipeline and reservoir project, alleging the agency violated federal laws by failing to consider less environmentally damaging alternatives when analyzing the Northern Integrated Supply Project.

  • January 26, 2024

    Trump Has 'No Serious Defense' In DQ Suit, Colo. Voters Say

    A group of Colorado voters seeking to disqualify Donald Trump from holding office said the former president has "no serious defense" against a trial court's findings that he spearheaded an insurrection, according to a brief filed Friday ahead of the U.S. Supreme Court's opening arguments on Feb. 8.

  • January 26, 2024

    Unpaid Royalties Not Ch. 11 Estate Property, 3rd Circ. Says

    Underpaid royalties on natural gas from leased land are property of the landowners under Colorado law, the Third Circuit has ruled, overturning a Delaware bankruptcy court's finding that the disputed funds belonged to the Chapter 11 estate of a former drilling company.

  • February 08, 2024

    Law360 Seeks Members For Its 2024 Editorial Boards

    Law360 is looking for avid readers of its publications to serve as members of its 2024 editorial advisory boards.

  • January 26, 2024

    Wife Accused Of Tax Crimes Must Keep GPS Monitor, US Says

    A woman indicted with her husband on tax evasion charges relating to an abusive trust scheme should not be allowed to remove her ankle monitor, the U.S. government told a Colorado federal court, saying her previous tracking devices sustained suspicious damage.

  • January 26, 2024

    Colo. Judge Knocks Crocs, Joybees For Bitter IP Fight

    A Colorado federal judge has urged rival shoemakers Crocs and Joybees to turn down the temperature in their intellectual property dispute, saying the companies have not been cooperating during discovery and are fighting over almost everything. 

  • January 26, 2024

    Colo. Metal Workers Sue Boss For Unpaid Wages

    The owner of a now-bankrupt Colorado metal fabrication and construction company has not been paying workers their wages, a group of current and former employees said in a proposed class action filed in federal court alleging their checks started bouncing in 2023.

  • January 25, 2024

    $5B Denver Cheese Co. Saves Trial Win In Family Feud

    A Colorado appellate panel on Thursday upheld the trial win of a $5 billion Denver cheese company that fended off a billion-dollar lawsuit by a niece of the private company's former CEO, with the panel concluding that "plaintiffs have not been deprived of all economic benefit of their shares."

  • January 25, 2024

    Judge Rejects Late Concession, Despite Possibly Absurd Trial

    A Colorado federal judge on Thursday rejected a joint venture's last-minute bid to concede liability on a $5 million claim ahead of a trial next week over a state toll lanes expansion, concluding his hands were tied even though it may be silly to forge ahead with trying the claim.

  • January 25, 2024

    Colo. REIT Overpaid For $21B Merger, Investor Says

    A shareholder of a Colorado-based real estate investment trust alleged in a Denver court Thursday the company misled investors about a $21 billion merger, overpaid for the acquisition by at least $1 billion and watered down the value of stock held by its existing investors.

  • January 25, 2024

    9th Circ. Urged To Affirm Pause On Idaho Abortion Travel Ban

    States including Washington, Arizona and California have urged the Ninth Circuit to affirm a lower court's temporary pause on an Idaho law making it a criminal offense to help minors travel out of state to receive abortions, calling it an "unconstitutional regime" that doesn't square with U.S. Supreme Court precedent.

  • January 25, 2024

    Colo. Panel Says Order Is Final When Interest Can Be Tallied

    A Colorado Court of Appeals panel found Thursday that an order granting prejudgment interest is final and appealable when the exact amount of interest can be easily calculated based on the order, a holding aimed at resolving a question left unanswered by another panel of the court.

  • January 25, 2024

    Kirkland-Led Warburg Selling Procare Solutions In $1.9B Deal

    Roper Technologies Inc. is buying child care software company Procare Solutions for nearly $1.9 billion from New York-based growth investor Warburg Pincus and private equity firm TA Associates, a minority investor in Procare, the companies said Thursday.

  • January 24, 2024

    Sens. Press For New Agency To Police BigTech On Privacy, AI

    A bipartisan group of U.S. senators is stepping up its push to establish a new federal agency to regulate the biggest players in the digital technology industry, telling the chamber's leader that "piecemeal efforts" to protect users' data privacy and address issues presented by the rapid rise of artificial technology have failed. 

  • January 24, 2024

    Judge Presses Colo. On State's Semi-Open Primaries

    A Colorado federal judge on Wednesday pressed the state to explain specific rationales for its semi-open primary system that allows unaffiliated voters to participate in Republican and Democratic primaries, asking how the state justified forcing party committees to reach near-unanimous agreement in order to keep out independents.

  • January 24, 2024

    Bid To Swap Chevron For An Old Standby Raises Doubts

    Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court debated whether a World War II-era doctrine encouraging courts to strongly consider agency statutory interpretations could replace the court's controversial so-called Chevron doctrine that requires judges to defer to those interpretations if a statute is ambiguous.

Expert Analysis

  • State Privacy Laws: Not As Comprehensive As You May Think

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    As more U.S. states enact privacy laws, companies must be aware that these laws vary in scope and content, meaning organizations should take a stringent approach to compliance by considering notice, choice and data security obligations, among other requirements, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Takeaways From Recent Developments In Bank-Fintech Space

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    Several recent consumer protection advancements affecting banks, technology and fintech companies, including the issuance of final regulatory guidance relating to third-party risk management, reemphasize the importance of closely assessing true lender issues in bank-fintech partnership arrangements, says Eamonn Moran at Norton Rose.

  • Deepfakes Remain A Threat Ahead Of 2024 Elections

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    Although this electoral season has already seen phony videos and images created to deceive the voting public — and deepfakes are surely destined to become all the more pervasive — there is still a lack of legislative progress on this issue, says Douglas Mirell at Greenberg Glusker.

  • Twitter Legal Fees Suit Offers Crash Course In Billing Ethics

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    X Corp.'s suit alleging that Wachtell grossly inflated its fees in the final days of Elon Musk’s Twitter acquisition provides a case study in how firms should protect their reputations by hewing to ethical billing practices and the high standards for professional conduct that govern attorney-client relationships, says Lourdes Fuentes at Karta Legal.

  • ABA's Money-Laundering Resolution Is A Balancing Act

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    While the American Bar Association’s recently passed resolution recognizes a lawyer's duty to discontinue representation that could facilitate money laundering and other fraudulent activity, it preserves, at least for now, the delicate balance of judicial, state-based regulation of the legal profession and the sanctity of the attorney-client relationship, say attorneys at Ballard Spahr.

  • Law Firm Professional Development Steps To Thrive In AI Era

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools rapidly evolve, professional development leaders are instrumental in preparing law firms for the paradigm shifts ahead, and should consider three strategies to help empower legal talent with the skills required to succeed in an increasingly complex technological landscape, say Steve Gluckman and Anusia Gillespie at SkillBurst Interactive.

  • The Basics Of Being A Knowledge Management Attorney

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Michael Lehet at Ogletree Deakins discusses the role of knowledge management attorneys at law firms, the common tasks they perform and practical tips for lawyers who may be considering becoming one.

  • Perspectives

    'True Threat' Ruling May Ensnare Kids' Online Speech

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent Counterman v. Colorado decision correctly held that a showing of intent is required to prosecute someone for true threats, but the amorphous standard adopted by the court risks overcriminalizing children’s use of social media and text-based communications, say Adam Pollet at Eversheds Sutherland and Suzanne La Pierre at Human Rights for Kids.

  • To Hire And Keep Top Talent, Think Beyond Compensation

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    Firms seeking to appeal to sophisticated clients and top-level partners should promote mentorship, ensure that attorneys from diverse backgrounds feel valued, and clarify policies about at-home work, says Patrick Moya at Quaero Group.

  • How Rate Exportation Is Shifting Amid Regulatory Trends

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    All banks and their partners, including fintechs, that wish to lend to borrowers in multiple states and charge uniform interest rates should heed regulatory developments across the country and determine how best to mitigate risks in their efforts to offer credit to consumers on a nationwide basis, say attorneys at Ballard Spahr.

  • Perspectives

    More States Should Join Effort To Close Legal Services Gap

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    Colorado is the most recent state to allow other types of legal providers, not just attorneys, to offer specific services in certain circumstances — and more states should rethink the century-old assumptions that shape our current regulatory rules, say Natalie Anne Knowlton and Janet Drobinske at the University of Denver.

  • Opinion

    10th Circ. Remand Of ERISA Claims To Insurer Is Problematic

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    The Tenth Circuit recently gave the defendant another bite at the apple in David P. v. United Healthcare by remanding Employee Retirement Income Security Act claims for reprocessing, but the statute lacks any provision authorizing remands of ERISA cases, says Mark DeBofsky at DeBofsky Law.

  • Identifying Trends And Tips In Litigation Financing Disclosure

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    Growing interest and controversy in litigation financing raise several salient concerns, but exploring recent compelled disclosure trends from courts around the country can help practitioners further their clients' interests, say Sean Callagy and Samuel Sokolsky at Arnold & Porter.

  • Why Employers Should Heed High Court Web Designer Ruling

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    While not an employment law ruling, the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in the First Amendment case 303 Creative v. Elenis raises serious questions for employers that constitute public accommodations and have related anti-discrimination policies, says Tanner Camp at Foley & Lardner.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Elrod On 'Jury Duty'

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    Though the mockumentary series “Jury Duty” features purposely outrageous characters, it offers a solemn lesson about the simple but brilliant design of the right to trial by jury, with an unwitting protagonist who even John Adams may have welcomed as an impartial foreperson, says Fifth Circuit Judge Jennifer Elrod.

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