Colorado

  • January 10, 2024

    Bill Floated To Study Bayh-Dole Requirement Inefficiencies

    A proposal is being floated that would require the U.S. Government Accountability Office to do a study of ways to streamline processes outlined in a law that cleared private organizations and universities to commercialize patents that came from government funding.

  • January 10, 2024

    Frontier Airlines Says Pass Holders Must Arbitrate Claims

    Frontier Airlines Inc. urged a Colorado federal judge Tuesday to toss a potential class action alleging that its "All You Can Fly" passes are "inoperable," saying in a motion that the customers agreed to arbitrate any claims when they signed up for the pass and that flight availability was never guaranteed.

  • January 10, 2024

    Ex-Trump Atty Who Pled Guilty In Ga. Faces Colo. Discipline

    A onetime senior legal adviser to former President Donald Trump facing calls for disbarment in Colorado has been served with a disciplinary complaint there after admitting to "intentionally aiding and abetting" a scheme to interfere with the 2020 election in Georgia, but the Colorado complaint stopped short of proposing specific punishment.

  • January 10, 2024

    $8M Atty Fee OK'd For $27M Maxar Investor Settlement

     A Colorado federal judge approved an $8.1 million award for attorneys who secured a $27 million settlement for shareholders in a suit accusing Maxar Technologies of using its $2.4 billion acquisition of a space imaging business to inflate its assets and hide problems with its vendor's satellite.

  • January 10, 2024

    Judge Sides With NFL Plan In Ex-Pro's Disability Benefits Suit

    A Texas federal court should rule that the NFL's disability benefits plan appropriately denied full assistance to a retired player after eight physicians determined he was capable of working despite mental and physical impairments, according to a magistrate judge's recommendation.

  • January 10, 2024

    Senate Confirms Colo. Magistrate Judge To District Court Seat

    The Senate voted 51-48 on Wednesday to confirm U.S. Magistrate Judge Kato Crews to the District of Colorado.

  • January 09, 2024

    Wary Justices Have Many Off-Ramps In Trump Ballot Dispute

    The U.S. Supreme Court took on an influential role, however unwanted, in the 2024 election when it agreed to review former President Donald Trump's disqualification from Colorado's primary ballot, but the court's decision to conduct a broad review of the ruling created several off-ramps that would allow the justices to avoid answering some of the stickiest questions over Trump's ability to hold office.

  • January 09, 2024

    Data Center Developer Lands $6.4B Amid AI-Fueled Demand

    Vantage Data Centers announced Tuesday it secured a $6.4 billion investment from DigitalBridge Group and Silver Lake, with which the hyperscale data center provider will be able to expand to meet exponentially growing data center needs tied to artificial intelligence demand.

  • January 09, 2024

    Student Housing Co. Inks $1M Settlement With Colo. AG

    A Colorado property management company that rents to thousands of students has agreed to pay $1 million to end a state probe of complaints from renters that it unlawfully held on to security deposits from tenants and charged improper fees, Colorado's top prosecutor announced Tuesday.

  • January 09, 2024

    Northwestern Law Prof. Again Ordered To Pay For 'Wasteful' Suit

    A Colorado federal judge ordered a Northwestern University law professor to pay $5,000 in attorney fees in the next 30 days as sanctions over his "vexatious and wasteful" attempt to remove part of a probate dispute with his sister to federal court, an attempt by the judge to clear up apparent confusion after the professor paid the money to a charity.

  • January 09, 2024

    Citing 'Plutonium Plume,' Enviro Groups Fight Colo. Trail

    Seven public health and environmental groups have sued multiple federal departments in D.C. federal court, accusing them of using "fatally flawed" environmental analyses to support its approval of an 8-mile trail through what the groups say is the most heavily plutonium-contaminated portion of Colorado's Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge.

  • January 09, 2024

    DC Circ. Skeptical Of Trump Immunity From Election Charges

    The D.C. Circuit on Tuesday appeared to doubt former President Donald Trump's theory that he has absolute immunity from prosecution for any acts taken while in the White House, telegraphing a variety of avenues for dismissing the embattled ex-president's key defense against charges of interfering in the 2020 presidential election.

  • January 09, 2024

    Pot Consultant Allegedly Burned By Client's Unreported Sales

    A consultancy facilitating cannabis sales between licensed businesses in Colorado says one of its customers broke a services contract by hawking products to certain retailers without the consultancy's approval, circumventing transaction fees in the process.

  • January 08, 2024

    Supreme Court Is Suddenly Embroiled In A Term For The Ages

    When 2024 began, the U.S. Supreme Court's docket — spanning abortion, guns, social media, the modern regulatory system and more — already seemed certain to shake up the nation's cultural and economic landscapes. But now there's also a showdown involving Donald Trump and America's constitutional bedrock, auguring a truly tectonic term.

  • January 08, 2024

    TV Host's Bias Suit Against Nuggets' Parent Kept Alive

    A Colorado federal judge on Monday rejected a summary judgment request from the parent company of cable and satellite channel Altitude Sports and Entertainment and the NBA's Denver Nuggets in a discrimination suit filed by a Hispanic TV announcer, finding that the plaintiff has shown triable factual issues.

  • January 08, 2024

    Colo. Legislators' Internal Voting Flouts State Law, Judge Says

    A Denver judge has ordered Democratic members of the Colorado General Assembly to stop using an internal and anonymous voting method to prioritize bills, concluding that while it could be a useful tool, the lawmakers have used the method to "bypass" the requirements of a state transparency law.

  • January 08, 2024

    Denver Firm Says Ex-Atty Can't Bring Abuse Of Process Claim

    A prominent Colorado personal injury law firm has asked a state judge to toss a counterclaim for abuse of process by a former employee and her family, arguing in a motion to dismiss that the firm has the right to collect on a more than $1 million judgment against the attorney.

  • January 08, 2024

    Apple Affiliate Says Criminal Charges 'Critical' To Wage Trial

    An Apple-affiliated repair company is making a last-ditch effort to dodge final judgment in a multistate wage class action, telling a North Carolina judge it should have been able to mention the lead plaintiff's pending criminal charges related to his employment during trial.

  • January 08, 2024

    HP Accused Of Using Software To Create Printer-Ink Monopoly

    A group of consumers has hit HP Inc. with a proposed antitrust class action in Illinois federal court, alleging the printer maker has a monopoly over the replacement-ink cartridge market and used software updates to block consumers from using cheaper rival cartridges in HP printers.

  • January 08, 2024

    Musk Brother Must Rehire Workers Laid Off Amid Union Push

    A Colorado nonprofit co-founded by Elon Musk's brother must temporarily reinstate 10 employees for a school-based gardening program while the National Labor Relations Board prosecutes allegations by the staff that the group's decision to shutter the program was anti-union retaliation, a federal judge recently ruled.

  • January 08, 2024

    Fight Over Contempt Email Service Heads To Colo. Justices

    The Colorado Supreme Court on Monday agreed to hear whether a contempt of court motion could be served over email rather than in person, with the appellant arguing the issue was too important to land in his inbox. 

  • January 08, 2024

    High Court Won't Disturb Kan. County's Win In ADA Bias Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined Monday to review a loss for a Kansas county worker who claimed that workplace injuries cost him his job, leaving in place a Tenth Circuit ruling that found he failed to rebut his ex-employer's argument that he was fired for insubordination.

  • January 08, 2024

    Justices Won't Take Up DOD, Ex-Sergeants Vax Mandate Spat

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to review a lawsuit lodged by two former U.S. Army and Marine Corps staff sergeants who accused the U.S. Department of Defense of forcing unlicensed COVID-19 vaccines on military servicemembers.

  • January 05, 2024

    Colo. Pot Co. Owner Says Partner Flouted Deal For Merger

    The founder of the Colorado-based Euflora chain of dispensaries is suing his partner and a multi-state cannabis operator, Jars Holdings Inc., which allegedly agreed to buy his $9.3 million share of the Euflora business, claiming they violated terms of the sale contract and acted in bad faith.

  • January 05, 2024

    Feds Say Colo. Outdoor Group Has No Basis To Halt Wolf Plan

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service urged a Colorado federal judge to reject a bid to halt reintroduction of gray wolves to Colorado, arguing in a brief Friday that an outdoor recreation group can't sue over impacts to Mexican wolves because the issue "has no connection" to their interests.

Expert Analysis

  • Courts Can Overturn Deficient State Regulations, Too

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    While suits challenging federal regulations have become commonplace, such cases against state agencies are virtually nonexistent, but many states have provisions that allow litigants to bring suit for regulations with inadequate cost-benefit analyses, says Reeve Bull at the Virginia Office of Regulatory Management.

  • Tales From The Trenches Of Remote Depositions

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    As practitioners continue to conduct depositions remotely in the post-pandemic world, these virtual environments are rife with opportunities for improper behavior such as witness coaching, scripted testimony and a general lack of civility — but there are methods to prevent and combat these behaviors, say Jennifer Gibbs and Bennett Moss at Zelle.

  • Employer Drug-Testing Policies Must Evolve With State Law

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    As multistate employers face ongoing challenges in drafting consistent marijuana testing policies due to the evolving patchwork of state laws, they should note some emerging patterns among local and state statutes to ensure compliance in different jurisdictions, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • The Supreme Court Is At War With Itself On Extraterritoriality

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently issued two conflicting pronouncements about the presumption against extraterritoriality without acknowledging the tensions between these decisions, which leaves lower courts, practitioners and potential defendants in the dark, says Jonah Knobler at Patterson Belknap.

  • Blunders That Made 'Bakked' Cannabis TM Go Up In Smoke

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    The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board’s recent denial of National Concessions Group’s application to register the mark “BAKKED” illustrates mistakes that cannabis companies must be wary of in pursuing federal registration as examiners may look beyond the four corners of an application, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

  • Level Up Lawyers' Business Development With Gamification

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    With employee engagement at a 10-year low in the U.S., there are several gamification techniques marketing and business development teams at law firms can use to make generating new clients and matters more appealing to lawyers, says Heather McCullough at Society 54.

  • Mallory Ruling Leaves Personal Jurisdiction Deeply Unsettled

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    In Mallory v. Norfolk Southern Railway, a closely divided U.S. Supreme Court recently rolled back key aspects of its 2017 opinion in Daimler AG v. Bauman that limited personal jurisdiction, leaving as many questions for businesses as it answers, say John Cerreta and James Rotondo at Day Pitney.

  • What The ESG Divide Means For Insurers And Beyond

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    The debate around ESG is becoming increasingly polarized, with some states passing legislation that prohibits the use of ESG factors and others advancing affirmative legislation, highlighting the importance for insurers and other companies to understand this complex legal landscape, say Scott Seaman and Bessie Daschbach at Hinshaw.

  • Unpacking The POWR Act, Colo.'s New Work Harassment Law

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    With the August rollout of Colorado’s Protecting Opportunities and Workers' Rights Act set to make it easier for employees to claim harassment, companies should confirm that their harassment prevention programs satisfy the law’s requirements and provide a clear method to investigate any future claims, say Mamie Ling and Michael Freimann at Armstrong Teasdale.

  • 5 Ways Firms Can Rethink Office Design In A Hybrid World

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    As workplaces across the country adapt to flexible work, law firms must prioritize individuality, amenities and technology in office design, says Kristin Cerutti at Nelson Worldwide.

  • A Midyear Look At How AI Is Affecting Lawyers

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    The past six months have been a notable period for advancements in artificial intelligence and generative AI, and as we head into the second half of the year, we must review the implications that AI has for the legal industry, including how lawyers will be advising clients on use of AI technology, says Natasha Allen at Foley & Lardner.

  • Flawed Analysis Supports Common Law Tax Deficiency Ruling

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    The Colorado federal district court’s recent decision in Liberty Global, holding that the U.S. Department of Justice may assert a common law tax claim without the notice of tax deficiency required by the Internal Revenue Code, relies on a contorted reading of the statute and irrelevant case law, say Loren Opper and Christie Galinski at Miller Canfield.

  • NY, Minn. Set Pace For Employee Breastfeeding Protections

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    Breastfeeding employees have gotten increased legal protections through recently effective amendments in New York and Minnesota, and the laws underline the need for employers to watch for state-level legislative efforts to extend these protections beyond federal requirements, say John Litchfield and Miranda Curtis at Foley & Lardner.

  • Opinion

    Bar Score Is Best Hiring Metric Post-Affirmative Action

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    After the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling striking down affirmative action admissions policies, law firms looking to foster diversity in hiring should view an applicant's Multistate Bar Examination score as the best metric of legal ability — over law school name or GPA, says attorney Alice Griffin.

  • Ghosting In BigLaw: How To Come Back From Lack Of Feedback

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    Junior associates can feel powerless when senior colleagues cut off contact instead of providing useful feedback, but young attorneys can get back on track by focusing on practical professional development and reexamining their career priorities, says Rachel Patterson at Orrick.

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