Commercial Contracts

  • February 13, 2024

    Wireless Tech Co. Can't Get $12.5M Award OK'd At 4th Circ.

    The Fourth Circuit on Tuesday overturned the enforcement of a $12.5 million arbitral award issued in a trade secrets dispute between wireless technology companies, ruling in a published opinion that the lower court lacked jurisdiction under the U.S. Supreme Court's 2022 decision in Badgerow v. Walters.

  • February 13, 2024

    Indian Pharma Co. Can't Get Fees In $950M COVID Vax Suit

    A Seattle federal judge has nixed an Indian generic-drug maker's bid for about $3 million in attorney fees after it prevailed in a biotherapy company's $950 million lawsuit accusing it of stealing its COVID-19 vaccine, saying the maker didn't convince him it spent extra money litigating the suit.

  • February 13, 2024

    Expert's 11th-Hour Change Blocked In Pet Device IP Retrial

    A New Jersey federal judge refused Tuesday to allow an expert witness to make an 11th-hour addition to his report on the "head start" period in a new damages trial on an inventor's claim that a pet supply company misappropriated her idea for a skin medicine applicator for dogs and cats.

  • February 13, 2024

    Esquire Bank Faces Merchant Action Over Chargeback Fees

    Esquire Bank NA and a payment processing company face a proposed class action alleging they deceptively charged their merchant payment processing customers certain improperly high fees without appropriate disclosure.

  • February 13, 2024

    Ship Co. Seeks 5th Circ. Redo On $200M Award Enforcement

    A German shipowner has asked the Fifth Circuit to reconsider whether to enforce a $200 million arbitral award it won following a deadly chemical explosion on its vessel, saying it never had a chance to respond to the argument that ultimately led to the decision.

  • February 13, 2024

    Wyndham Gets Default Win In Timeshare Exit Suit

    A Florida federal judge has granted Wyndham Vacation Ownership Inc. a default victory in its lawsuit accusing multiple companies of levying unnecessary fees to help customers exit their timeshares, after adopting a magistrate's report and recommendation when one company failed to respond.

  • February 13, 2024

    Soroc Tech Sues In Del. For $115M Merger Takeback

    Soroc Technology Holdings LLC sued MainOne Technology Solutions LLC on Tuesday in Delaware's Court of Chancery, seeking recovery of the $115 million it paid in early 2022 for its acquisition of MainOne's interest in DecisionOne Corp.

  • February 13, 2024

    Insurer Can't Toss Claims As Sanctions In Hotel Fire Suit

    A Colorado federal judge has rejected an insurer's request to toss a construction contractor's counterclaims as sanctions for discovery failures in a dispute over a $3 million hotel fire, with the judge finding no problems with a magistrate judge's decision to instead award attorney fees and costs.

  • February 13, 2024

    Judge Disqualifies Alston & Bird Over Conflict In IP Case

    A California federal judge granted Rocket Resume's request to withdraw Alston & Bird LLP as its counsel in a copyright suit against Bold Ltd., which had previously asked to disqualify the firm over its past legal work for Bold.

  • February 13, 2024

    Billing Cos. Deny Claims By Health Facility In $7M Fraud Case

    Three medical billing companies are fighting a suit by a mental health treatment facility alleging their "incompetence" cost it roughly $7 million in lost revenue and damages, telling a Connecticut federal judge that the facility wrongly terminated their agreement.

  • February 13, 2024

    Texas Appeals Court Grants Medical Coding Co.'s Atty Fee Bid

    A Texas appellate panel has ordered a diagnostics business to pay a medical coding company's attorney fees following a contract dispute between the companies, issuing a judgment Tuesday that also affirmed a trial court's decision to grant the coding company summary judgment.

  • February 13, 2024

    5th Person Pleads Guilty In Pa. Art, Sports Memorabilia Thefts

    A fifth person has pled guilty to participating in a 20-year art and sports memorabilia theft ring that targeted Andy Warhol and Jackson Pollock paintings and Yogi Berra MVP plaques, among other items from institutions across the country.

  • February 13, 2024

    Hotel Rental Co. Hid Litigation And Failed Deal, Suit Says

    Real estate company LuxUrban Hotels has been hit with a proposed class action alleging it lied about a 25-year deal with the Royalton Hotel in New York and multiple lawsuits over unpaid rent, which it says caused shares to decline after a short-seller report disclosed the issues.

  • February 13, 2024

    Insurance Co. Stock Fight Belongs In Del., NC Judge Rules

    A former partner in an insurance brokerage who alleges the company gave him a lowball offer to buy back his shares after he was fired should have brought his complaint in Delaware, a North Carolina Business Court judge has ruled in granting the brokerage's motion to dismiss.

  • February 13, 2024

    Power Trader Fights $25M Loss Over Winter Storm At 5th Circ.

    A power trader told the Fifth Circuit Monday that a lower court wrongly awarded an electricity seller over $25 million in a contract fight over electricity price-hedging deals that sustained heavy losses during 2021's Winter Storm Uri, arguing that the seller already made a 41,982% return on its power transmission costs.

  • February 13, 2024

    Ex-DraftKings Exec's Attys Seek $310K For Court Pingpong

    Lawyers for a former DraftKings Inc. executive who recently defected to rival Fanatics are seeking more than $310,000 in attorney fees, arguing the amount is reasonable and would cover their work for two "objectively unreasonable" removals of the case to federal court by DraftKings, behavior they called "disturbing litigation conduct."

  • February 13, 2024

    Enbridge, ExxonMobil Accused Of Monopolizing Oil Transport

    Enbridge and ExxonMobil were hit with an antitrust suit in Illinois federal court Tuesday accusing them of working together to deny others access to crude oil pipelines, pulling the plug on a new way to transport oil from the Chicago area after a company invested $11 million.

  • February 13, 2024

    Fla. Atty Says Philly Firm Can't Sue Her In Sunshine State

    A Florida attorney urged a Sunshine State federal court to throw out the counterclaims and affirmative defenses of a Philadelphia-based personal injury firm, arguing Florida law cannot be applied to their dispute over claims she was running a side business as a litigation fee expert.

  • February 13, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    A pizza chain, an energy company, a medical-device maker and a Manila casino were all hit with book-and-record demands last week in Delaware's Court of Chancery. A shoe company also walked away from a shareholder suit, two cryptocurrency companies tallied the costs of a broken merger, and three cigarette giants argued over Florida settlement payments.

  • February 13, 2024

    Staffing Co. Sues NC Nursing Home Over Unpaid Invoices

    A North Carolina nursing home has stopped paying a healthcare staffing company for nurses it provided as part of a service contract, according to a federal lawsuit outlining more than $1 million in unpaid invoices.

  • February 13, 2024

    Insurer Says Fire Co. Owes $3.7M For Hotel Water Damage

    A fire protection and security services company must pay more than $3.7 million for water damage at an Ohio hotel, a Liberty Mutual unit told an Ohio federal court, arguing that the damage was caused by the company's negligence in maintaining a fire sprinkler system.

  • February 13, 2024

    Pot Distributor Accuses 'Amazon Of Hemp' Of Breaking Contract

    A cannabis distribution company and a family farm are suing online retailer Mood Product Group LLC in North Carolina state court, saying Mood violated a distribution contract and took confidential information in a bid to cut its partners out of the supply chain.

  • February 12, 2024

    Meta Can't Trim Non-Facebook Users' Health Privacy Suit

    Meta Platforms can't cut down a proposed class action alleging it illegally received consumers' sensitive health information through its Meta Pixel tool, a California federal judge ruled Monday, saying the consumers have provided specific enough allegations of the kinds of sensitive information they claim was intercepted.

  • February 12, 2024

    Justices Asked To Ignore 'Unremarkable' McDonald's Ruling

    Former McDonald's workers urged the U.S. Supreme Court not to review the hamburger chain's appeal of a Seventh Circuit ruling reviving a proposed class action targeting the company's since-discontinued franchise agreement's no-poach provisions.

  • February 12, 2024

    Live Nation Buyers Urge 9th Circ. To Nix Arbitration Rules

    Consumers suing Live Nation and Ticketmaster in a proposed antitrust class action have told the Ninth Circuit that a district court correctly ruled the companies' failure to tell ticket buyers they were switching to a new arbitrator is "procedurally unconscionable to an extreme degree."

Expert Analysis

  • HHS Advisory Highlights Free Product Inducement Risks

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    A recent U.S. Department of Health and Human Services advisory opinion highlights concerns that valuable free products and other inducements may influence patients and providers to choose one manufacturer’s product over another, notwithstanding that such free healthcare products may be a benefit, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Attorneys' Busiest Times Can Be Business Opportunities

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    Attorneys who resolve to grow their revenue and client base in 2024 should be careful not to abandon their goals when they get too busy with client work, because these periods of zero bandwidth can actually be a catalyst for future growth, says Amy Drysdale at Alchemy Consulting.

  • In The World Of Legal Ethics, 10 Trends To Note From 2023

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    Lucian Pera at Adams and Reese and Trisha Rich at Holland & Knight identify the top legal ethics trends from 2023 — including issues related to hot documents, artificial intelligence and cybersecurity — that lawyers should be aware of to put their best foot forward.

  • Del. Dispatch: The 2023 Corporate Cases You Need To Know

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    Corporate and mergers and acquisitions litigation has continued at a fevered pace this year, with the Delaware courts addressing numerous novel issues with important practical implications, including officer exculpation and buyer aiding-and-abetting liability, say attorneys at Fried Frank.

  • Contract Claims Recap: Termination and Accrual

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    Edward Arnold and Bret Marfut at Seyfarth Shaw examine three recent decisions that illustrate why contractors should consider, during the bidding process, impediments to their ability to meet contract requirements, and the need to track the accrual dates of individual claims that may arise during performance to avoid being time-barred.

  • The Year In FRAND: What To Know Heading Into 2024

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    In 2023, there were eight significant developments concerning the fair, reasonable and nondiscriminatory patent licensing regime that undergirds technical standardization, say Tom Millikan and Kevin Zeck at Perkins Coie.

  • How Attorneys Can Be More Efficient This Holiday Season

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    Attorneys should consider a few key tips to speed up their work during the holidays so they can join the festivities — from streamlining the document review process to creating similar folder structures, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • What DOD Commercial Product Rule Means For Contractors

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    A recent amendment to the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement, along with forthcoming changes to the definition of what constitutes a subcontract, will offer some relief for commercial products and services contractors, but the U.S. Department of Defense should do more to reduce regulatory burdens, say Daniel Ramish and Jonathan Shaffer at Haynes Boone.

  • How Int'l Student-Athlete Law Would Change The NIL Game

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    Recently proposed legislation to allow international student-athletes the opportunity to profit from their name, image and likeness without violating their F-1 nonimmigrant student visa status represents a pivotal step in NIL policy, and universities must assess and adapt their approaches to accommodate unique immigration concerns, say attorneys at Phelps Dunbar.

  • A Former Bankruptcy Judge Talks 2023 High Court Rulings

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    In 2023, the U.S. Supreme Court issued four bankruptcy law opinions — an extraordinary number — and a close look at these cases signals that changes to the U.S. Bankruptcy Code will have to come from Congress, not the courts, says Phillip Shefferly at the University of Michigan Law School.

  • Series

    Children's Book Writing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Becoming a children's book author has opened doors to incredible new experiences of which I barely dared to dream, but the process has also changed my life by serving as a reminder that strong writing, networking and public speaking skills are hugely beneficial to a legal career, says Shaunna Bailey at Sheppard Mullin.

  • 5 Steps For Healthcare Companies After Biden's AI Order

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    Rather than simply monitoring for the issuance of agency guidelines on artificial intelligence in the wake of President Joe Biden's October executive order, health and life sciences companies should take action now and begin building internal operational and technical infrastructures designed to govern the use of AI, says Joy Sharp at Faegre Drinker.

  • 7 Ways To Address Unknowns In Outsourcing Contracts

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    Amid rising business uncertainty, companies outsourcing critical functions should build flexibility into their contracts and adopt several contracting approaches to be prepared for a large range of unknown conditions, say Brad Peterson and Laura Buchanan at Mayer Brown.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • When Patients Have Standing For Hospital Antitrust Suits

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    Brown v. Hartford Healthcare Corp., recently decided by a Connecticut state court, provides a useful examination of how antitrust standing issues may be analyzed when patients directly sue a healthcare system for anti-competitive conduct, says Charles Honart at Stevens & Lee.

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