Commercial Contracts

  • February 15, 2024

    Feds Say Tax Prepper Filed Over $1M In False 2020 Returns

    The U.S. Department of Justice's Tax Division took an Ohio tax preparer and his two businesses to federal court alleging he has employed "at least four definable schemes to generate or inflate his customers' refunds" and cost the government $1 million in revenue for the 2020 tax year alone.

  • February 14, 2024

    American Airlines Settles Ticketing Row With Travel Website

    American Airlines Inc. told a Texas federal court Tuesday that it has settled its lawsuit claiming that Kiwi.com sold the airline's tickets and displayed American's trademarks and copyright-protected flight symbol without permission.

  • February 14, 2024

    Telecom Confusion Caused $56M Damages, Conn. Judge Told

    A telecommunications company's confusion about bankruptcy law played a key role in the disintegration of a contract for Los Angeles telephone switching equipment and related telecom services, a company seeking $56 million told a Connecticut state judge on Wednesday as a bench trial kicked off in the 14-year-old case.

  • February 14, 2024

    Legal Org. Backs Lyft In Supreme Court PAGA Fight

    Representative and individual claims brought under California's Private Attorneys General Act are inseparable when it comes to arbitration, a legal organization told the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday, backing Lyft's challenge to a California state appellate court's decision preserving a former driver's representative claims.

  • February 14, 2024

    Telefonica Gets Win In $570M Busted Deal Dispute

    A New York state judge has said Spanish telecommunications company Telefonica SA is entitled to compensatory damages in a suit it launched against Millicom International Cellular SA over claims the mobile provider reneged on a $570 million deal to buy Telefonica's Costa Rican subsidiary.

  • February 14, 2024

    Security Firms Want Suit Over Toll Bros. Deal Trimmed Again

    Two home security companies asked a Connecticut state court to further trim a breach-of-contract suit brought by the security arm of Pennsylvania-based building firm Toll Brothers over a $12 million deal to buy customer accounts.

  • February 14, 2024

    Trucking Groups Score Win In Ocean Carriers FMC Dispute

    The Federal Maritime Commission has said that ocean carriers flouted U.S. law by requiring trucking companies to only use specific chassis providers to haul container cargo from certain ports in California, Illinois, Georgia and Tennessee, in a dispute related to pandemic-era supply chain logjams.

  • February 14, 2024

    FTC Seeks Info On 'Powerful Middlemen' Amid Drug Shortages

    The Department of Health and Human Services and the Federal Trade Commission announced Wednesday that they are seeking information on whether legal exemptions for "middlemen" in the generic pharmaceutical market are driving ongoing drug shortages.

  • February 14, 2024

    Nokia Exposure Over $23M Oral Deal Won't Be Clear Until Trial

    A federal judge said Wednesday she won't decide until trial what framework a jury will use to decide damages in a New Hampshire telecom's case against Nokia over an alleged breach of a 2017 oral contract to integrate noise-filtering technology into Nokia's cell networks.

  • February 14, 2024

    Energy Co. Says Tribal Court Being Used To Duck $12M Award

    Merit Energy Operations is asking a federal district court to block two Wyoming tribes from using the tribal judicial system to vacate a $12.6 million arbitration award against them, saying the move is a blatant attempt to escape the ultimate result in the case.

  • February 14, 2024

    Fla. Condo Says Chubb Unit Stalled On $7M Storm Claim

    A Florida Keys condominium has sued a Chubb unit over coverage related to $7.3 million worth of damage sustained during a 2017 hurricane, saying the company breached "industry standards" by dragging its feet on a claim and issued an amount less than what was needed for repairs.

  • February 14, 2024

    Ill. Judge Says Rezoning Of Historic Hotel Damaged Developer

    An Illinois federal judge found that the city of Chicago improperly zoned the historic Pittsfield Building for strictly residential use not long after agreeing with the former owner and developer to zone the property for a new hotel.

  • February 14, 2024

    Phone-Maker Says T-Mobile Can't Hang Up On $100M Suit

    A mobile phone manufacturer suing T-Mobile over a canceled order for nearly 500,000 devices told a Washington federal judge the telecommunications giant is now seeking to escape $100 million in damages by leaning on an unsigned contractual provision.

  • February 14, 2024

    Breach Of Contract Claims Trimmed In $30M GameStop Suit

    A Delaware federal court dropped some allegations related to the breach of contract claims against GameStop in a $30 million fee dispute, saying the plaintiff, Boston Consulting Group, has not pled a viable claim in some instances despite having three chances to do so.

  • February 14, 2024

    Chicago Eatery Biz Exec's Bid For Atty Privilege Challenged

    Investors in Chicago restaurant Maple & Ash told an Illinois court that a principal at the eatery's management firm wrongly acted as a lawyer in their corporate theft lawsuit against the firm, saying he inappropriately seeks to assert attorney-client privilege over 6,000 documents in the suit.

  • February 14, 2024

    BCLP Can Fight Atlanta Firm's Fee Garnishing Request

    Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP can now appeal a trial court's ruling ordering the firm to return just over $125,000 in connection to a dispute between an Atlanta attorney and an airport travel spa operator, a Georgia state appellate court ruled Wednesday.

  • February 14, 2024

    Musk To Face Severance Fight In Del. Court After Stay Lifted

    A proposed class action claiming workers didn't receive their severance or were fired after Elon Musk acquired Twitter is back on track after a Delaware federal judge lifted a temporary stay Wednesday.

  • February 14, 2024

    TMZ Ordered To Pay $300K In Atty Fees Over Bus Tour Case

    A California federal judge on Monday ordered TMZ to reimburse a Hollywood bus tour operator almost $300,000 in attorney fees after the operator convinced the court to vacate an arbitration award favoring the celebrity news provider based on an arbitrator's failure to disclose relevant information.

  • February 14, 2024

    Jordan Spieth Fights Subpoena In Under Armour Patent Suit

    Golf pro and Dallas native Jordan Spieth wants to avoid testifying in a patent suit claiming Under Armour stole design features of high-performance athletic shoes, as basketball superstar Steph Curry simultaneously squashed a subpoena in the same case.

  • February 14, 2024

    Insurer Wants Out Of Covering SC Club Shooting

    A Nationwide unit has told a South Carolina federal court it doesn't have to defend a nightclub operator against a former patron's negligence suit, arguing that an assault and battery exclusion in its liquor liability policy bars coverage for the claimant's shooting-related injuries.

  • February 13, 2024

    Wireless Tech Co. Can't Get $12.5M Award OK'd At 4th Circ.

    The Fourth Circuit on Tuesday overturned the enforcement of a $12.5 million arbitral award issued in a trade secrets dispute between wireless technology companies, ruling in a published opinion that the lower court lacked jurisdiction under the U.S. Supreme Court's 2022 decision in Badgerow v. Walters.

  • February 13, 2024

    Indian Pharma Co. Can't Get Fees In $950M COVID Vax Suit

    A Seattle federal judge has nixed an Indian generic-drug maker's bid for about $3 million in attorney fees after it prevailed in a biotherapy company's $950 million lawsuit accusing it of stealing its COVID-19 vaccine, saying the maker didn't convince him it spent extra money litigating the suit.

  • February 13, 2024

    Expert's 11th-Hour Change Blocked In Pet Device IP Retrial

    A New Jersey federal judge refused Tuesday to allow an expert witness to make an 11th-hour addition to his report on the "head start" period in a new damages trial on an inventor's claim that a pet supply company misappropriated her idea for a skin medicine applicator for dogs and cats.

  • February 13, 2024

    Esquire Bank Faces Merchant Action Over Chargeback Fees

    Esquire Bank NA and a payment processing company face a proposed class action alleging they deceptively charged their merchant payment processing customers certain improperly high fees without appropriate disclosure.

  • February 13, 2024

    Ship Co. Seeks 5th Circ. Redo On $200M Award Enforcement

    A German shipowner has asked the Fifth Circuit to reconsider whether to enforce a $200 million arbitral award it won following a deadly chemical explosion on its vessel, saying it never had a chance to respond to the argument that ultimately led to the decision.

Expert Analysis

  • 7 Ways To Address Unknowns In Outsourcing Contracts

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    Amid rising business uncertainty, companies outsourcing critical functions should build flexibility into their contracts and adopt several contracting approaches to be prepared for a large range of unknown conditions, say Brad Peterson and Laura Buchanan at Mayer Brown.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • When Patients Have Standing For Hospital Antitrust Suits

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    Brown v. Hartford Healthcare Corp., recently decided by a Connecticut state court, provides a useful examination of how antitrust standing issues may be analyzed when patients directly sue a healthcare system for anti-competitive conduct, says Charles Honart at Stevens & Lee.

  • Insurer's '600-Lb. Life' Win Shows Why Fraud Suits Don't Stick

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    A Texas federal court’s recent ruling that Philadelphia Indemnity Co. did not fraudulently induce Megalomedia, the production company behind reality show “My 600-Lb. Life,” into purchasing insurance, demonstrates why a policyholder’s fraudulent inducement claim against an insurer will rarely succeed, says Robert Tugander at Rivkin Radler.

  • What 3rd Circ. Gets Wrong About Arbitration Enforcement

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    The Third Circuit and other courts should correct their current law, exemplified by the Third Circuit's recent decision in Henry v. Wilmington Trust, requiring a motion to dismiss based on an arbitration clause because it conflicts with the Federal Arbitration Act, the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, and — with regard to the improper-venue approach — U.S. Supreme Court precedent, says David Cinotti at Pashman Stein.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • Inside DOD's Final Commercial Products And Services Rule

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    The recently released final amendment of a Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement provision will help streamline negotiations over subcontracts that provide commercial products and services, but its failure to address certain key questions means government contractors must still await further guidance, say Alex Sarria and Connor Farrell at Miller & Chevalier.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • Expect CFPB Flex Over Large Nonbank Payment Cos.

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    A recent enforcement action and a new rule proposal from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau indicate a growing focus on the nonbank payment ecosystem, especially larger participants, in 2024, say Felix Shipkevich and Jessica Livingston at Shipkevich.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • IRA Monetization Energizes Clean Power Tax Credit Market

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    Recent large sales of clean energy production tax credits reflect an environment in which the Inflation Reduction Act's provisions for monetizing such credits via direct transfer — bypassing slow, costly tax equity transactions — offer opportunities for both developers and investors, says Andrew Eastman at Husch Blackwell.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • Pay Attention To Contract Law Tenets Amid AI Incorporation

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    Providers of information technology products and services are rushing to market with various generative artificial intelligence-based solutions and attempting to unilaterally amend existing agreements with their customers, but parties should beware that such amendments may be one-sided, say Jeffrey Harvey and Sharon Harrington at Hunton.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

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    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

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