Connecticut

  • February 21, 2024

    Conn. Court Pauses Refund Plan For Ex-Nursing Students

    Over the objections of the Connecticut attorney general, a judge has temporarily halted a state agency's plan to refund some tuition money that students paid to the now-shuttered nursing school Stone Academy, siding with a proposed class of affected students who want to avoid waiving their legal rights in order to receive the payments.

  • February 21, 2024

    Connecticut Atty To Settle Client's Suit Over Cash Mishap

    A Connecticut lawyer who allegedly sent part of his client's $286,000 real estate transaction to a purported fraudster posing as that client with a fake email address has come to a "tentative settlement" to resolve the malpractice suit against him, new state court filings show.

  • February 21, 2024

    Feds Seek 5 Years Over Red Sox Network Exec's Billing Fraud

    Federal prosecutors are arguing for a prison sentence of more than five years for a former executive with the network that broadcasts Boston Red Sox and Boston Bruins games after he was convicted of stealing more than $575,000 from the company through a sham billing scheme.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justices Won't Hear JPMorgan Syndicated Loan Dispute

    The U.S. Supreme Court decided on Tuesdsay that it will not hear a dispute accusing JPMorgan Chase and other banks of failing to warn noteholders about the risks of lending money to a soon-to-be bankrupt company, keeping the case's dismissal intact after the Second Circuit ruled that the syndicated loan at the center of the case was not subject to securities laws.

  • February 20, 2024

    Conn. Judge Reluctantly Frees Snap From Sex Assault Suit

    A Connecticut state judge on Friday reluctantly ended a suit alleging Snap Inc. linked an underage girl to registered sex offenders who raped and assaulted her, quoting a First Circuit opinion that held such cases are difficult since Section 230 requires courts to deny relief "to plaintiffs whose circumstances evoke outrage."

  • February 20, 2024

    2nd Circ. Won't Restore Allergan Investors' Breast Implant Suit

    A Second Circuit panel on Tuesday declined to revive a class action accusing Allergan Ltd. of downplaying cancer risks linked to the company's breast implants, holding in a summary order that the investors failed to show any duty by Allergan to disclose certain information related to the alleged health concerns, or that the company made any false or misleading statements.

  • February 20, 2024

    Skipped Hearing Sinks Conn. Pot Store Fight, Court Told  

    A lawsuit seeking to revoke the approval of a cannabis retail permit in Stamford, Connecticut, cannot proceed because a coalition of anti-pot taxpayers followed the wrong process by skipping a public hearing and suing instead, the city's counsel told a state judge during an oral argument on Tuesday.

  • February 20, 2024

    Conn. State Worker Wins $5K In Racial Hostility Claims

    Connecticut's state energy and environmental regulator is liable for the hostile work environment that a Black employee endured before and after he claimed that he found a noose near his workstation in June 2018, a federal jury has found.

  • February 20, 2024

    Paul Hastings, Others Seek $9.9M In Kwok Ch. 11 Case Fees

    Paul Hastings LLP and six other law firms and professional services organizations have filed applications seeking more than $9.9 million in fees and expenses in the global Chapter 11 saga of Chinese exile Ho Wan Kwok, leaving the cost of the two-year-old case at well more than $30 million.

  • February 20, 2024

    Boomerang In Default For Silence On $7M Del. Contract Suit

    A defunct steel tube plant that failed to respond to a Delaware Chancery Court lawsuit seeking $7.35 million for unpaid invoices was found in default Tuesday after failing to appear in court for more than a year and a half.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ex-IBM Workers Can't Get Justices To Tackle Age Bias Battle

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday turned away a group of ex-IBM workers' bid for review of a Second Circuit ruling that said they had to pursue age bias claims in arbitration rather than court, despite their argument that the decision conflicted with high court precedent.

  • February 20, 2024

    Truist Selling Insurance Brokerage At $15.5B Value

    Truist Financial Corp. said Tuesday it has agreed to sell its remaining stake in subsidiary Truist Insurance Holdings to an investor group led by private equity firms Stone Point Capital and Clayton Dubilier & Rice, in an all-cash transaction that gives the insurance brokerage an enterprise value of $15.5 billion.

  • February 20, 2024

    High Court Denies Review Of Wrestler Attorney Sanctions

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to review a petition from an attorney seeking to vacate a $312,000 sanctions order over his representation of former wrestlers over brain injuries they suffered while working for World Wrestling Entertainment Inc.

  • February 16, 2024

    The Congressman Who Reps Cannabis Reform On Capitol Hill

    Rep. Earl Blumenauer speaks to Law360 about the prospects for Congress enacting marijuana reform, why he supports moving cannabis to Schedule III and some of the drug policy triumphs and setbacks in his home state of Oregon.

  • February 16, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Deadlines, Delivery Drivers & Smog

    The U.S. Supreme Court will be closed Monday for Presidents Day and will begin a short oral argument week on Tuesday, during which the justices will consider the deadlines for challenging a federal agency's action and bringing copyright infringement claims.

  • February 16, 2024

    2nd Circ. Shows How To Shut Down ERISA Self-Dealing Suits

    A recent Second Circuit decision affirming Goldman Sachs' win in a class action that took aim at proprietary funds in the bank's 401(k) plan provides an employer-side "road map" for staving off or defeating legal challenges to allegedly subpar in-house investment options, attorneys say.

  • February 16, 2024

    DC Circ. Sends Ambulance Co. Info Spat Back To NLRB

    The D.C. Circuit on Friday vacated a National Labor Relations Board decision that found an ambulance company unlawfully withheld information from a union, telling the board to review the company's obligation to provide documents under the parties' labor contract.

  • February 16, 2024

    Kwok Trustee Files RICO Claims As Judge Extends Deadlines

    Alleging bankruptcy fraud, money laundering and other claims, the Chapter 11 trustee overseeing the $374 million bankruptcy of Chinese exile Ho Wan Kwok has filed a civil Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations complaint against Kwok's relatives, his onetime attorney and others, including two companies connected to Donald Trump aides.

  • February 16, 2024

    No Coverage For Conn. Firm's Malpractice Fight, Insurer Says

    The law firm Evans & Lewis LLC and partner Douglas J. Lewis should lose a breach of contract suit against their malpractice carrier because they were already in the early stages of battling a professional misconduct claim when the relevant policy went into effect, the insurer told the Connecticut Superior Court in seeking summary judgment.

  • February 15, 2024

    AGs Press FDA On Safeguards Against Metal In Baby Food

    Attorneys general from states across the country urged the U.S. Food and Drug Administration once again on Thursday to establish requirements that baby food producers test for lead and other metals in products headed for store shelves, citing a recent wave of childhood lead poisoning connected to recalled applesauce pouches.  

  • February 15, 2024

    Conn. Justice Calls Marriott Lien Fight 'An Embarrassment'

    A "bizarre" appeal that seeks the discharge of a sewer assessment lien on a Marriott hotel property is "a waste of everybody's time," a Connecticut Supreme Court justice said Thursday amid oral argument.

  • February 15, 2024

    What Rescheduling Pot Would Mean For Criminal Justice Reform

    While federal drug enforcers mull a recommendation from health regulators to loosen restrictions on marijuana, criminal justice reformers are warning that rescheduling the drug would not realize President Joe Biden's campaign promise to decriminalize marijuana.

  • February 15, 2024

    Petition Watch: Classes, Litigation Changes & Fraud Theories

    The U.S. Supreme Court receives thousands of petitions for review each term, but only a few make the news. Here, Law360 looks at four petitions filed in the past three weeks that you might've missed, including questions over how courts should analyze class certification bids and regulations restricting specific speech for content-neutral reasons, whether plaintiffs must reestablish standing after amending lawsuits, and what constitutes fraud.

  • February 15, 2024

    Conn. Judges' Backgrounds Affect Housing Cases: Study

    Connecticut renters are more likely to face harsher judgments in housing proceedings before a judge with a corporate or prosecutorial background, who make up many of those on Connecticut's bench, according to a recent report.

  • February 15, 2024

    Quinnipiac Law Names Willamette Law's Dean As New Leader

    The dean of Oregon's Willamette University College of Law is leaving his post after nearly four years to become the next leader of Connecticut's Quinnipiac University School of Law.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Purdue Ch. 11 Case Exemplifies Need For 3rd-Party Releases

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    In the Purdue Pharma Chapter 11 case, the U.S. Supreme Court will eventually decide whether the Bankruptcy Code authorizes a court to approve third-party releases, but removing this powerful tool would be a significant blow to the likelihood of future victims being made whole, says Isaac Marcushamer at DGIM Law.

  • To Hire And Keep Top Talent, Think Beyond Compensation

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    Firms seeking to appeal to sophisticated clients and top-level partners should promote mentorship, ensure that attorneys from diverse backgrounds feel valued, and clarify policies about at-home work, says Patrick Moya at Quaero Group.

  • How Rate Exportation Is Shifting Amid Regulatory Trends

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    All banks and their partners, including fintechs, that wish to lend to borrowers in multiple states and charge uniform interest rates should heed regulatory developments across the country and determine how best to mitigate risks in their efforts to offer credit to consumers on a nationwide basis, say attorneys at Ballard Spahr.

  • 2nd Circ. Goldman Ruling May Hinder Securities Classes

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    The Second Circuit's recent Arkansas Teacher Retirement System v. Goldman Sachs decision, decertifying a class of investors and seemingly resolving a decadelong dispute, makes it substantially more difficult for plaintiffs to certify securities classes based on generic misstatements — a significant win for the defense bar, say attorneys at Willkie.

  • Perspectives

    More States Should Join Effort To Close Legal Services Gap

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    Colorado is the most recent state to allow other types of legal providers, not just attorneys, to offer specific services in certain circumstances — and more states should rethink the century-old assumptions that shape our current regulatory rules, say Natalie Anne Knowlton and Janet Drobinske at the University of Denver.

  • Identifying Trends And Tips In Litigation Financing Disclosure

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    Growing interest and controversy in litigation financing raise several salient concerns, but exploring recent compelled disclosure trends from courts around the country can help practitioners further their clients' interests, say Sean Callagy and Samuel Sokolsky at Arnold & Porter.

  • 10 Legal Subject Matters Popping Up In AI Litigation

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    The past five years have brought judicial opinions addressing artificial intelligence in many different legal areas, so a study of existing case law is an important first step for in-house counsel addressing how to advise on the uncertainty driving many of the AI legal disputes, says Mark Davies at Orrick.

  • Conn. Ruling Highlights Keys To Certificate-Of-Need Appeals

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    The Connecticut Supreme Court's recent decision in High Watch Recovery Center v. Department of Public Health, rejecting rigid application of statutes concerning certificate-of-need procedure, provides important guidance on building an administrative record to support a finding that a case is contested, say attorneys at Robinson & Cole.

  • What's Notable In Connecticut's New Cannabis Laws

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    The Connecticut Legislature recently passed four bills containing cannabis provisions — ranging from applicable tax credits to labor agreement requirements — that may prove to be a mixed bag for state operators, say Sarah Westby and Deanna McWeeney at Shipman & Goodwin.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Elrod On 'Jury Duty'

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    Though the mockumentary series “Jury Duty” features purposely outrageous characters, it offers a solemn lesson about the simple but brilliant design of the right to trial by jury, with an unwitting protagonist who even John Adams may have welcomed as an impartial foreperson, says Fifth Circuit Judge Jennifer Elrod.

  • Upcoming High Court ADA Cases May Signal Return To Basics

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    Recent cases, including Acheson Hotels v. Laufer, which will be heard by the U.S. Supreme Court in October, raise a fundamental question of whether Americans with Disabilities Act litigation has spiraled out of control without any real corresponding benefits to the intended beneficiaries: individuals with true disabilities, says Norman Dupont at Ring Bender.

  • 4 Business-Building Strategies For Introvert Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Introverted lawyers can build client bases to rival their extroverted peers’ by adapting time-tested strategies for business development that can work for any personality — such as claiming a niche, networking for maximum impact, drawing on existing contacts and more, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • Prepping For OSHA Standard On Violence Risk In Health Care

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    Though the Occupational Safety and Health Administration has yet to create a new standard to address violence against health care workers, employers can prepare for coming federal regulatory changes by studying existing state rules and past OSHA citations, then taking steps to improve their safety programs, say attorneys at Ogletree.

  • Opinion

    Has The NCAA Not Learned NIL Policy Lessons Of The Past?

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    The NCAA has applied its heavy hand — which has been slapped back by courts and legislatures — again, saying that colleges must comply with its name, image and likeness policies even if they conflict with state laws, but recent antitrust decisions might caution against its reasoning, says Kenneth Jacobsen at Temple University.

  • Opinion

    3 Ways Justices' Disclosure Defenses Miss The Ethical Point

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    The rule-bound interpretation of financial disclosures preferred by U.S. Supreme Court Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas — demonstrated in their respective statements defending their failure to disclose gifts from billionaires — show that they do not understand the ethical aspects of the public's concern, says Jim Moliterno at the Washington and Lee University School of Law.

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