Connecticut

  • February 15, 2024

    Conn. Justice Calls Marriott Lien Fight 'An Embarrassment'

    A "bizarre" appeal that seeks the discharge of a sewer assessment lien on a Marriott hotel property is "a waste of everybody's time," a Connecticut Supreme Court justice said Thursday amid oral argument.

  • February 15, 2024

    What Rescheduling Pot Would Mean For Criminal Justice Reform

    While federal drug enforcers mull a recommendation from health regulators to loosen restrictions on marijuana, criminal justice reformers are warning that rescheduling the drug would not realize President Joe Biden's campaign promise to decriminalize marijuana.

  • February 15, 2024

    Petition Watch: Classes, Litigation Changes & Fraud Theories

    The U.S. Supreme Court receives thousands of petitions for review each term, but only a few make the news. Here, Law360 looks at four petitions filed in the past three weeks that you might've missed, including questions over how courts should analyze class certification bids and regulations restricting specific speech for content-neutral reasons, whether plaintiffs must reestablish standing after amending lawsuits, and what constitutes fraud.

  • February 15, 2024

    Conn. Judges' Backgrounds Affect Housing Cases: Study

    Connecticut renters are more likely to face harsher judgments in housing proceedings before a judge with a corporate or prosecutorial background, who make up many of those on Connecticut's bench, according to a recent report.

  • February 15, 2024

    Quinnipiac Law Names Willamette Law's Dean As New Leader

    The dean of Oregon's Willamette University College of Law is leaving his post after nearly four years to become the next leader of Connecticut's Quinnipiac University School of Law.

  • February 14, 2024

    Telecom Confusion Caused $56M Damages, Conn. Judge Told

    A telecommunications company's confusion about bankruptcy law played a key role in the disintegration of a contract for Los Angeles telephone switching equipment and related telecom services, a company seeking $56 million told a Connecticut state judge on Wednesday as a bench trial kicked off in the 14-year-old case.

  • February 14, 2024

    Security Firms Want Suit Over Toll Bros. Deal Trimmed Again

    Two home security companies asked a Connecticut state court to further trim a breach-of-contract suit brought by the security arm of Pennsylvania-based building firm Toll Brothers over a $12 million deal to buy customer accounts.

  • February 14, 2024

    DHS Warns Of Reduced Operations With Budget Shortfall

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is warning it may have to pare back border security initiatives and removal procedures, while green card and asylum backlogs worsen, if Congress doesn't provide additional funding, per a Wednesday email to Law360.

  • February 14, 2024

    2nd Circ. Nixes LGBTQ Groups' Suit Against HHS Grant Policy

    The Second Circuit on Wednesday affirmed a trial court's dismissal of a suit by a group of LGBTQ advocacy organizations against the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services challenging a Trump-era notice that the agency wouldn't enforce a rule barring HHS grant recipients from discriminating.

  • February 14, 2024

    2nd Circ. Backs Goldman's Victory In 401(k) Self-Dealing Suit

    The Second Circuit upheld Goldman Sachs' win in a class action from 29,000 employee 401(k) plan participants who said the banking giant violated federal benefits law by including underperforming proprietary investment funds in their investment roster, citing evidence Wednesday of a "robust process" to manage potential conflicts.

  • February 14, 2024

    Conn. Justices Suspect Sleepy Juror Will Wake Up Murder Case

    The Connecticut Supreme Court was skeptical Wednesday of the state prosecutor's position that a judge was entirely blameless for apparently allowing a juror in a murder trial to sleep for more than an hour, and then letting the case proceed to a conviction after taking little action on the matter.

  • February 14, 2024

    Bulleit Is No Household Name, Distiller Tells 2nd Circ.

    The Bulleit brand may be well known among whiskey drinkers but does not have the general fame needed to support a jury's finding that its bottle shape is protected by trademark law, an attorney for rival distiller W.J. Deutsch & Sons Ltd. told the Second Circuit during a hearing Wednesday.

  • February 13, 2024

    Billing Cos. Deny Claims By Health Facility In $7M Fraud Case

    Three medical billing companies are fighting a suit by a mental health treatment facility alleging their "incompetence" cost it roughly $7 million in lost revenue and damages, telling a Connecticut federal judge that the facility wrongly terminated their agreement.

  • February 13, 2024

    $1.37M Conn. Contract Suit Revived After Counsel Secured

    A federal breach of contract lawsuit arising from the construction of an apartment complex in Hartford can proceed now that the plaintiff has secured new counsel, a judge in the District of Connecticut ruled Tuesday in overturning her own decision to kill the case last October.

  • February 13, 2024

    ESPN Bet To Launch In NY After Sports Betting Licenses Deal

    Penn Entertainment Inc. revealed Tuesday that it is acquiring New York mobile sports wagering licenses from Kirkland & Ellis LLP-advised Wynn Interactive Holdings for $25 million, allowing the entertainment giant to launch ESPN Bet in the state.

  • February 13, 2024

    Conn. Judge Nom Blames Order Gaffe On 'Very Bad Moment'

    Connecticut lawmakers on Tuesday grilled a judge about an admonishment he received for berating a man over disobeying a nonexistent court order — a lapse the jurist attributed to a "very bad moment" — and also questioned his respect for the state high court's precedent.

  • February 13, 2024

    Conn. Agency Loses Sanctions Bid In Worker's Noose Suit

    A Black employee of Connecticut's energy and environmental regulator who claims he found a noose in his workplace in 2018 will not face new sanctions for deleting the alleged photo evidence, a federal judge ruled Tuesday in declining to end the hostile workplace lawsuit midtrial.

  • February 13, 2024

    Officer Says He Was Denied Work Due To Race, Med. Pot Use

    A Connecticut police officer who was injured in training says he was wrongfully denied disability retirement and was unable to secure administrative work after injuring his neck, experiencing discrimination based on his race and ethnicity as well as his physical disability.

  • February 13, 2024

    Troutman Pepper Faces One Of Kwok Trustee's Clawbacks

    The trustee overseeing Chinese exile Ho Wan Kwok's Chapter 11 case has filed an adversary complaint against Troutman Pepper Hamilton Sanders LLP in a Connecticut bankruptcy court, saying Kwok transferred almost $2 million in prepetition funds and more than $80,000 in post-petition funds to the firm through his shell companies.

  • February 12, 2024

    Ex-McCarter & English Client Can Pursue $20M Loan Claims

    A Connecticut state court judge has denied a bid by McCarter & English LLP and a former partner for an early win in an insurance company's multimillion-dollar malpractice suit, ruling that the continuing representation doctrine allowed the plaintiff to toll the statute of limitations and continue to press its case.

  • February 12, 2024

    Utility Sues Connecticut Over $14M Rate Hike Bid Denial

    Saying a move by the state of Connecticut was yet another measure blocking it from maintaining "financial integrity," The United Illuminating Co. has added to its list of legal feuds with the state by challenging a Dec. 29, 2023, regulatory denial of a $14 million interim rate increase request.

  • February 12, 2024

    Ex-Flight Attendant Wants JetBlue Sanctioned In Docs Fight

    JetBlue Airways Corp. should be held in contempt of court and sanctioned for failing to turn over documents in a former flight attendant's lawsuit over allegedly toxic fumes that she inhaled on the job, she and her husband have told a Connecticut federal court in a motion to force the airline's compliance with a subpoena.

  • February 12, 2024

    Exxon Defends Expert's Testimony In Conn. Benzene Suit

    Exxon on Friday hit back at a bid for sanctions brought by the estate of a man who died of leukemia allegedly due to exposure to defective gasoline, telling a Connecticut state court that its expert "did not testify falsely — period" at trial.

  • February 12, 2024

    Schools' $104M Aid-Fixing Deal OK'd, Vanderbilt Deal Coming

    An Illinois federal judge on Monday granted initial approval to a $104.5 million deal with Yale, Emory, Brown, Columbia and Duke in a proposed antitrust class action claiming that 17 universities conspired to limit student aid, with another settlement from Vanderbilt expected to hit the docket in the coming weeks.

  • February 12, 2024

    Cannabis Co. Says Conn. Wrongly Denied Social Equity Status

    A Connecticut cannabis retailer is appealing the denial of its application for one of the state's equity joint venture licenses, saying the Social Equity Council went against state law when it found that the company's co-owner no longer qualified as a social equity applicant.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Has The NCAA Not Learned NIL Policy Lessons Of The Past?

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    The NCAA has applied its heavy hand — which has been slapped back by courts and legislatures — again, saying that colleges must comply with its name, image and likeness policies even if they conflict with state laws, but recent antitrust decisions might caution against its reasoning, says Kenneth Jacobsen at Temple University.

  • Opinion

    3 Ways Justices' Disclosure Defenses Miss The Ethical Point

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    The rule-bound interpretation of financial disclosures preferred by U.S. Supreme Court Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas — demonstrated in their respective statements defending their failure to disclose gifts from billionaires — show that they do not understand the ethical aspects of the public's concern, says Jim Moliterno at the Washington and Lee University School of Law.

  • Cannabis Plain Packaging Rules: Examples And Opportunities

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    States that have legalized adult-use cannabis in recent years have adopted stringent requirements for product packaging and labeling in an effort to protect minors, and these rules may provide a vehicle for compromise between proponents and opponents of legalization, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • What Courts' Deference Preference Can Mean For Sentencing

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Vargas decision deepens the split among federal appeals courts on the level of deference afforded to commentary in the U.S. sentencing guidelines — an issue that has major real-life ramifications for defendants, and is likely bound for the U.S. Supreme Court, say Jennifer Freel and Michael Murtha at Jackson Walker.

  • Trump's 'I Thought I Won' Jan. 6 Defense Is Unlikely To Prevail

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    Since being indicted for his alleged attempts to overthrow the 2020 presidential election, former President Donald Trump’s legal team has argued that because he genuinely believed he won, his actions were not fraudulent — but this so-called mistake of fact defense will face a steep uphill battle for several key reasons, says Elizabeth Roper at Baker McKenzie.

  • Caregiver Flexibility Is Crucial For Atty Engagement, Retention

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    As the battle for top talent continues post-pandemic, many firms are attempting to attract employees with progressive hybrid working environments — and supporting caregivers before, during and after an extended leave is a critically important way to retain top talent, says Manar Morales at The Diversity & Flexibility Alliance.

  • Lenders Must Look To The Law As Fla. Joins Disclosure Trend

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    Given the varying range in scope of state commercial financing disclosure laws — including the one recently enacted in Florida — and the penalties for noncompliance, providers of commercial credit should carefully consider whether such laws apply to their commercial lending business, say attorneys at Winston & Strawn.

  • Opinion

    3 Principles Should Guide MTC's Digital Products Tax Work

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    As the Multistate Tax Commission's project to harmonize sales tax on digital products moves forward, three key principles will help the commission's work group arrive at unambiguous definitions and help states avoid unintended costs, say Charles Kearns and Jeffrey Friedman at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • 3 Ideas To Guide In-House Counsel On Creating AI Policies

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    When drafting guidelines on generative artificial intelligence use for organizations that have a heightened need to safeguard their intellectual property, in-house counsel will need to address some gray areas that have become difficult to navigate in order to set their company up for success, say Enrique Abarca and Tanner Jarrell at Nabors Corporate.

  • In-Office Engagement Is Essential To Associate Development

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    As law firms develop return-to-office policies that allow hybrid work arrangements, they should incorporate the specific types of in-person engagement likely to help associates develop attributes common among successful firm leaders, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • SEC Focus On Perks Offers Insights On Cooperation

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's recent settlement with Stanley Black & Decker is the latest example of the SEC's continued focus on executive perquisites and highlights what type of cooperation may be required to avoid a civil money penalty, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Trends Emerge In High Court's Criminal Law Decisions

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    In its 2022-2023 term, the U.S. Supreme Court issued nine merits decisions in criminal cases covering a wide range of issues, and while each decision is independently important, when viewed together, key trends and takeaways appear that will affect defendants moving forward, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

  • Terror Funding Suit Could Affect Inherited Jurisdiction In NY

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    Depending on how New York’s highest court answers two questions certified from the Second Circuit in a case litigating companies’ liability for terrorist attacks, foreign companies with no relevant New York contacts may be subject to suit in state courts by virtue of an asset purchase, say attorneys at Norton Rose.

  • Perspectives

    A Judge's Pitch To Revive The Jury Trial

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    Ohio state Judge Pierre Bergeron explains how the decline of the jury trial threatens public confidence in the judiciary and even democracy as a whole, and he offers ideas to restore this sacred right.

  • How To Recognize And Recover From Lawyer Loneliness

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    Law can be one of the loneliest professions, but there are practical steps that attorneys and their managers can take to help themselves and their peers improve their emotional health, strengthen their social bonds and protect their performance, says psychologist and attorney Traci Cipriano.

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