Construction

  • February 15, 2024

    La. Co. Fails To Prove Army Misled In $14M Canal Fix Deal

    A New Orleans contractor can't get cost adjustments on a $14.6 million deal with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to remediate canal erosion, after a dispute resolution board found no difference between the contract's description of the site and actual site conditions.

  • February 15, 2024

    Greenberg Traurig Adds 2 Real Estate Experts From DLA Piper

    Greenberg Traurig LLP has brought on two seasoned DLA Piper construction law experts as its newest shareholders, adding them to the firm's Atlanta office in what Greenberg Traurig called a "strategic move to enhance its full-service, industry-leading real estate capabilities."

  • February 14, 2024

    USDA Says $20M Will Help Tribes Access Climate Market

    Federally recognized tribes and Alaska Native corporations and villages are getting a $20 million bump to broaden their access to emerging climate markets as a way to address ongoing climate change, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said on Wednesday.

  • February 14, 2024

    Network Group Wants Faster Access To Utility Poles

    Federal regulators must push for further reforms in order to expedite talks between utility pole owners and high-speed equipment attachers on how to divvy up pole upgrade costs, a broadband trade group said.

  • February 14, 2024

    Security Firms Want Suit Over Toll Bros. Deal Trimmed Again

    Two home security companies asked a Connecticut state court to further trim a breach-of-contract suit brought by the security arm of Pennsylvania-based building firm Toll Brothers over a $12 million deal to buy customer accounts.

  • February 14, 2024

    Investors Urge Prison As Developers Seek More Briefing Time

    Two real estate developers on Wednesday asked for more time to respond to EB-5 investors' request that they be imprisoned for hiding their money instead of paying overdue settlements and sanctions judgments, telling an Illinois federal judge their attorney wrote down the court's deadline incorrectly.

  • February 14, 2024

    'Besieged' Melamine Biz Calls For Tariffs On 6 Countries

    A Louisiana chemical company saying it's "besieged" by foreign competition pressed U.S. trade officials Wednesday to investigate imports of a plastic compound, alleging that producers from six countries were using unfair trade practices to squeeze it out.

  • February 14, 2024

    Feds, Power Line Developer Decry Tribes' Suit As 'Too Late'

    The federal government and SunZia Transmission LLC, the developer of a 550-mile power line, urged an Arizona federal judge Tuesday to deny a request from tribes and conservations groups for a preliminary injunction halting the project's construction, saying they waited too long to make their challenge.

  • February 14, 2024

    Ex-Cognizant Execs Fight Co.'s Bid To Shield Bribe Evidence

    Two former Cognizant executives have called on a New Jersey federal court to reject the company's attempt to shield evidence related to a purported bribe as the executives face a criminal trial over a separate bribery scheme.

  • February 14, 2024

    Mass. Court Doubts Northeastern Vowed To Keep Land Public

    Massachusetts Appeals Court justices appeared Wednesday to question a claim by the town of Nahant and a group of residents that Northeastern University had implicitly dedicated oceanfront land it acquired in the 1960s as a wildlife preserve and park by allowing public access for decades.

  • February 14, 2024

    11th Circuit Urged To Toss Ga. Developer's Truck Stop Suit

    Georgia's Rockdale County is asking the Eleventh Circuit to uphold its victory over a developer's suit against a local zoning ordinance that blocked his QuikTrip truck stop project near Interstate 20.

  • February 13, 2024

    Squabble Heats Up Over Plans To Move DC NBA, NHL Teams

    Billionaire Ted Leonsis' efforts to dislodge his sports teams Washington Wizards and Washington Capitals from the District of Columbia, and put down stakes in Virginia have run into resistance, including from a Virginia state senator and the mayor of Washington, D.C.

  • February 13, 2024

    Insurer Can't Toss Claims As Sanctions In Hotel Fire Suit

    A Colorado federal judge has rejected an insurer's request to toss a construction contractor's counterclaims as sanctions for discovery failures in a dispute over a $3 million hotel fire, with the judge finding no problems with a magistrate judge's decision to instead award attorney fees and costs.

  • February 13, 2024

    $1.37M Conn. Contract Suit Revived After Counsel Secured

    A federal breach of contract lawsuit arising from the construction of an apartment complex in Hartford can proceed now that the plaintiff has secured new counsel, a judge in the District of Connecticut ruled Tuesday in overturning her own decision to kill the case last October.

  • February 13, 2024

    Calif. Clean Energy Storage Secures $350M From Blackstone

    Arevon Energy Inc. said Tuesday that it closed on financing for a California renewable energy storage facility, including $350 million from a Blackstone unit in the form of preferred equity, with guidance from three law firms.

  • February 13, 2024

    Trade Court Backs Commerce's 4th Go At Taiwan Nail Duties

    The U.S. Court of International Trade backed the U.S. Department of Commerce's fourth try at defending its approach to calculating anti-dumping duties for Taiwanese steel nails, accepting the department's reasons for departing from academic literature calling for a different approach.

  • February 13, 2024

    Mass Arrests In NYC Housing Bribe Case Trouble Attys

    An anti-corruption crackdown targeting New York City public housing workers accused of taking bribes for contract work is raising eyebrows among defense lawyers, who critiqued what they saw as a heavy-handed approach even as many envision quick, favorable resolutions.

  • February 13, 2024

    DC Circ. Again Nixes Challenge To FERC Pipeline Powers

    The D.C. Circuit has reinstated its prior judgment affirming a lower court's dismissal of Virginia landowners' constitutional challenge to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's approval of the Mountain Valley Pipeline, nearly a year after the U.S. Supreme Court remanded the case.

  • February 13, 2024

    Bourbon Co. Says Ky. City Caved To Whiskey Fungus Fear

    A bourbon-maker has sued the city of Williamstown, Kentucky, and its top officials in federal court after they backed out of a deal to help build a set of warehouses to age liquor in response to concerns from residents that ethanol from the facility could feed the spread of so-called whiskey fungus nearby.

  • February 13, 2024

    Insurer Says Fire Co. Owes $3.7M For Hotel Water Damage

    A fire protection and security services company must pay more than $3.7 million for water damage at an Ohio hotel, a Liberty Mutual unit told an Ohio federal court, arguing that the damage was caused by the company's negligence in maintaining a fire sprinkler system.

  • February 12, 2024

    DC Circ. Probes FERC Review Of La. Natural Gas Terminal

    A D.C. Circuit panel on Monday questioned the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's refusal to formally characterize a Louisiana liquefied natural gas export terminal's contributions to climate change, with one judge indicating that regulators' reluctance to make determinations creates unnecessary challenges in deciding the project's fate.

  • February 12, 2024

    Activists Ask Justices To Reverse Calif. Tribal Casino Approval

    An anti-casino advocacy group has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review a Ninth Circuit decision that upholds the dismissal of its suit, claiming the federal government erred when finding that the Ione Band of Miwok Indians is eligible to open a casino in California.

  • February 12, 2024

    China Tariff Expansion Not Duty 'Modification,' Fed. Circ. Told

    The Trump administration knowingly disregarded statutory language allowing tariff "modifications" when it enlarged duties covering Chinese goods from $50 billion to over $300 billion, importers challenging the program said in a Federal Circuit brief Monday.

  • February 12, 2024

    Utah Defends Standing In Monument Cases Before 10th Circ.

    The state of Utah has doubled down in urging the Tenth Circuit to reverse a Utah federal judge's decision dismissing the state's challenge of the Biden administration's redesignation of large swaths of land as part of two national monuments, saying its case should have readily survived the motions to dismiss that led to its downfall.

  • February 12, 2024

    7th Circ. Says Plaintiffs' Strategy Doomed Lead Paint Appeal

    The Seventh Circuit has largely rejected a bid to revive toxic tort cases brought by roughly 170 plaintiffs allegedly harmed by lead paint pigment, saying a trial ruling dashing some members' claims applied broadly to almost the entire group.

Expert Analysis

  • 4 PR Pointers When Your Case Is In The News

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    Media coverage of new lawsuits exploded last year, demonstrating why defense attorneys should devise a public relations plan that complements their legal strategy, incorporating several objectives to balance ethical obligations and advocacy, say Nathan Burchfiel at Pinkston and Ryan June at Castañeda + Heidelman.

  • After Headwinds, 2024 May See Offshore Wind Momentum

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    Despite skyrocketing raw material costs, conflicting state and federal policies, and other setbacks for the offshore wind sector in 2023, the industry appears poised for growth in the coming year, with improving economics, more flexible procurement procedures and increasing legislative support, say Emily Huggins Jones and Ben Cowan at Locke Lord.

  • Law Firm Strategies For Successfully Navigating 2024 Trends

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    Though law firms face the dual challenge of external and internal pressures as they enter 2024, firms willing to pivot will be able to stand out by adapting to stakeholder needs and reimagining their infrastructure, says Shireen Hilal at Maior Consultants.

  • The Most-Read Legal Industry Law360 Guest Articles Of 2023

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    A range of legal industry topics drew readers' attention in Law360's Expert Analysis section this year, from associate retention strategies to ethical billing practices.

  • Attorneys' Busiest Times Can Be Business Opportunities

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    Attorneys who resolve to grow their revenue and client base in 2024 should be careful not to abandon their goals when they get too busy with client work, because these periods of zero bandwidth can actually be a catalyst for future growth, says Amy Drysdale at Alchemy Consulting.

  • A Difficult Year For CRE, But Future May Be Brighter

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    2023 was a challenging year for the commercial real estate industry, marked by significant uncertainty, but market pressure and signs of rising interest rates provide some reasons to be cautiously optimistic for the year ahead as pandemic headwinds and gridlock fade away, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • In The World Of Legal Ethics, 10 Trends To Note From 2023

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    Lucian Pera at Adams and Reese and Trisha Rich at Holland & Knight identify the top legal ethics trends from 2023 — including issues related to hot documents, artificial intelligence and cybersecurity — that lawyers should be aware of to put their best foot forward.

  • Contract Claims Recap: Termination and Accrual

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    Edward Arnold and Bret Marfut at Seyfarth Shaw examine three recent decisions that illustrate why contractors should consider, during the bidding process, impediments to their ability to meet contract requirements, and the need to track the accrual dates of individual claims that may arise during performance to avoid being time-barred.

  • How Attorneys Can Be More Efficient This Holiday Season

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    Attorneys should consider a few key tips to speed up their work during the holidays so they can join the festivities — from streamlining the document review process to creating similar folder structures, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Clean Water Act Jurisdiction Still Murky After A Choppy 2023

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    This year brought several important Clean Water Act jurisdictional developments, including multiple agency rules and a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that substantially altered the definition of "waters of the United States," but a new wave of litigation challenges has already begun, with no clear end in sight, say attorneys at Nossaman.

  • A Look At FedNow Liability Allocation And A 4th Circ. Toss-Up

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    Dsu-Wei Yuen and Andrew Lorentz at Davis Wright break down the current legal requirements that are directly applicable to common electronic payment systems like FedNow and Automated Clearing House and how they could be affected by a decision in Studco v. 1st Advantage Credit Union, currently on appeal in the Fourth Circuit.

  • 5 Trends To Watch In Property And Casualty Class Actions

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    In 2023, class action decisions have altered the landscape for five major types of claims affecting property and casualty insurers — total loss vehicle valuation, labor depreciation, other structural loss estimating theories, total loss vehicle tax and regulatory fees, and New Mexico's uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage sale requirements, say Mark Johnson and Mathew Drocton at BakerHostetler.

  • Series

    Children's Book Writing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Becoming a children's book author has opened doors to incredible new experiences of which I barely dared to dream, but the process has also changed my life by serving as a reminder that strong writing, networking and public speaking skills are hugely beneficial to a legal career, says Shaunna Bailey at Sheppard Mullin.

  • 'Brownfields' Definition Key To Energy Community Tax Credits

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    As the IRS rolls out guidance for claiming community energy tax credits under the Inflation Reduction Act, a review of the long-standing statutory definition of "brownfields" reveals that it continues to serve the goal of creating opportunities for investment in abandoned properties, says Louise Dyble at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Why Courts Are Nixing Insurer Defense Recoupment Claims

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    Following a recent trend, the Hawaii Supreme Court's decision in St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Co. v. Bodell Construction Co. provides a concise explanation of the argument that an insurer generally may not recoup costs for defending claims, based on three considerations, says Bradley Nash at Hoguet Newman.

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