Consumer Protection

  • February 23, 2024

    Judge Won't Reschedule Google's Ad Tech Trial In Va.

    A Virginia federal judge refused a request from Google on Friday to reschedule a slated September trial for the U.S. Department of Justice's ad tech monopolization case, saying the tech giant can overcome a potential timing conflict for its attorneys.

  • February 23, 2024

    BofA Seeks Win In Pa. Vehicle Repossession Class Action

    Bank of America NA has asked a Pennsylvania federal judge to grant it a win in a suit alleging it sent inadequate notice letters to people whose cars it repossessed, arguing that because the car owners admit the notices did not affect their ability to redeem their vehicles, there is no genuine issue in the case.

  • February 23, 2024

    Fla. Doctor Says T-Mobile Let Hacker Steal Her SIM Card

    A Tampa, Florida, doctor has sued T-Mobile for allegedly failing to stop a "SIM swap" hacker from transferring her personal phone account and then doing little to address the identity theft that followed, which involved the hacker trying to steal thousands from her retirement account and using her medical credentials to write more than 700 fraudulent prescriptions.

  • February 23, 2024

    Kraken Wants SEC Suit Tossed, Says Tokens Aren't Securities

    Crypto exchange Kraken on Friday urged a California federal judge to permanently toss claims it failed to register its platform with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission since the regulator has not shown that the tokens on its platform are investment contracts.

  • February 23, 2024

    Tobacco Cos. Look To Nix COPD Suit Decades After Diagnosis

    Tobacco companies R.J. Reynolds and Philip Morris asked a Massachusetts state judge on Friday to end a wrongful death lawsuit brought decades after a woman's COPD diagnosis and nearly three years after her death, pointing to a state high court ruling last summer that affirmed strict time limits for such claims.

  • February 23, 2024

    Media, App Groups Wary Of Allowing Data Mining, AI Hacking

    Publishers and entertainment industry groups have urged the government to reject proposed exemptions to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act that would broaden protections for text-and-data mining and allow hackers to study biases in artificial intelligence models, raising concerns about infringement and cybersecurity.

  • February 23, 2024

    Conn. Justices OK $2.9M Cut To Power Co.'s Cost Recovery

    Connecticut's highest court on Friday held that state energy regulators properly trimmed a power company's annual cost recovery bid by more than $2.86 million, agreeing with a lower court that it was not arbitrary or capricious to decline to pass the expense to customers.

  • February 23, 2024

    FDIC Slaps Small Tenn. Bank With Fintech Oversight Order

    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. on Friday announced a consent order with a small Tennessee bank that stresses the risks of the bank's relationships with third-party fintech companies.

  • February 23, 2024

    Sirius XM Subscription Suit Booted Back To NY State Court

    A Manhattan federal judge on Thursday granted a request by the New York attorney general's office to proceed in state court with claims accusing Sirius XM of deceptive subscriber retention practices, rejecting the company's bid to litigate in federal court.

  • February 23, 2024

    Co. Saddled Retirement Plan With Mediocre Funds, Suit Says

    SAS Institute Inc. cost workers millions in savings by failing to trim underperforming investment funds from its $3.6 billion retirement plan, according to a proposed class action filed against the software analytics giant in North Carolina federal court.

  • February 23, 2024

    Walgreens Investors Near Deal In Suit Over Opioid Epidemic

    An Illinois federal judge agreed Friday to maintain a stay in a stockholder derivative suit accusing Walgreens and its leadership of failing to limit retail pharmacies from dispensing unreasonable amounts of opioids, a day after the parties announced an agreement in principle to resolve their dispute.

  • February 23, 2024

    Binance Judge Says Greed Overtook Ethics, OKs $4.3B Plea

    A Washington federal judge signed off Friday on Binance's $4.3 billion plea deal on money laundering and bank fraud charges, saying from the bench that the cryptocurrency exchange's ethics violations could not be explained away by mere ignorance. 

  • February 23, 2024

    Congress Must Fund Next-Gen 911, 9 Ex-FCC Chairs Say

    Nine former chairs of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission, who served under Democratic and Republican administrations, are urging congressional leadership to fully commit to implementing the next generation of 911.

  • February 23, 2024

    Ohio Chamber Backs Google In 'Common Carrier' Case

    Ohio's Chamber of Commerce is lining up behind tech behemoth Google in its battle to convince an Ohio court that it is not a common carrier while the state is trying to convince the court that Google is, so it may be banned from preferring its own products in its search results.

  • February 23, 2024

    Judge Nixes Walmart 'Raw Honey' False Ad Class Action

    A Chicago federal judge granted dismissal of a proposed class action against Walmart alleging its "raw honey" and "organic raw honey" were falsely branded, saying there were no allegations about what the lead plaintiff believed when he bought the products, or what a reasonable consumer would believe.

  • February 23, 2024

    Feds' Crypto Focus Is No Longer On 'Whack-A-Mole' Cases

    The U.S. Department of Justice is no longer playing "whack-a-mole" in its crypto cases, and instead is taking on large-scale actors in the hopes of encouraging industrywide compliance, veteran crypto-focused prosecutors with the Manhattan U.S. attorney's office said Friday.

  • February 23, 2024

    Quinn Emanuel Wins Bid To Lead Amazon Returns Case

    A Washington federal judge has tapped Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP to serve as interim class counsel in a proposed class action against Amazon regarding its return policies.

  • February 23, 2024

    Motorola, Mass. Police Sued For Using Intercepting Devices

    Motorola sold technology that let the Massachusetts State Police make illegal, warrantless recordings during investigations, according to a federal class action filed by four men claiming to be subjects of the secret recordings.

  • February 22, 2024

    Family Dollar Accused Of Knowingly Selling Unsafe Drugs

    Two customers hit Family Dollar Stores Inc. and its parent company Dollar Tree Inc. with a proposed class action Wednesday in Florida federal court, alleging the discount chain stored over-the-counter drugs in high temperatures but still sold the unsafe products to consumers.

  • February 22, 2024

    BofA Card Holders Fight Uphill To Save Interest Charge Suit

    A California federal judge appeared inclined to toss a proposed class action claiming Bank of America illegally imposes excessive interest charges on variable-rate credit card holders, asking during a hearing Thursday if the plaintiff's counsel could "bolster" the complaint if the bank's motion to dismiss were granted.

  • February 22, 2024

    BofA Pulling Fast One To Exit Gag Clause Suit, Customers Say

    Consumers suing Bank of America for allegedly trying to stifle consumer critics through clauses in its online service agreements have urged a California federal judge not to toss their suit, arguing the bank's dismissal arguments are without legal merit, factually incorrect and "intended to mislead."

  • February 22, 2024

    Texas Developer Battles DOJ's 1st Predatory Mortgages Suit

    A Texas land developer is fighting back against a high-profile predatory lending lawsuit filed by the U.S. Department of Justice and Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, telling a Houston federal judge that the government's "reverse redlining" theory isn't legally sound and relies on sloppy loan comparisons.

  • February 22, 2024

    Wash. AG Seeks $1.2M In Damages For Debt Collector's Errors

    A debt collection company should pay more than $1.2 million after it "didn't even come close to complying with the law" while recovering medical debt payments for a hospital in Washington, the state attorney general's office told a judge during a bench trial Thursday.

  • February 22, 2024

    Lawmakers Press Big Banks On Muslim Discrimination Claims

    A group of five Democratic lawmakers on Thursday pressured the leaders of JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, Wells Fargo and Citibank for information on how they work to prevent discrimination in banking, pointing to media reports of "de-risking" practices that target Muslim Americans.

  • February 22, 2024

    Game Maker Deserves Sanctions For Sealed Docs, Court Told

    High 5 Games and its attorneys should be slapped with sanctions for repeatedly trying to seal nearly all company records and filing overly long court briefs in a class action accusing the casino phone game developer of defrauding players, according to a motion filed by the lead plaintiff.

Expert Analysis

  • What Brands Must Know For Calif. Recycle Label Compliance

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    A brand that stamps nonrecyclable packaging with the chasing arrows symbol could face liability under California's new law on labeling recyclable material, so brand owners should keep an eye on the state's pending survey process to identify which materials meet the criteria before requirements go into effect, say attorneys at ArentFox Schiff.

  • FTC AI Inquiry Signals Intensified Focus On Emerging Tech

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    The Federal Trade Commission's recent inquiry into investments and partnerships between Big Tech companies and artificial intelligence startups appears to be directed at guiding future enforcement decisions in competition, privacy and consumer protection — and three principles discussed at a related tech summit give insight on the agency's approach, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Preparing For A New Wave Of Litigation Under Silicosis Rules

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    After the Division of Occupational Safety and Health of California issued an emergency temporary standard to combat noncompliance with assessments of workers' exposure to particles of crystalline silica, companies that manufacture, distribute or sell silica-containing products will need aggressive case-specific discovery to navigate a new wave of litigation, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Managing Competing Priorities In Witness Preparation

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    There’s often a divide between what attorneys and witnesses want out of the deposition process, but litigation teams can use several strategies to resolve this tension and help witnesses be more comfortable with the difficult conditions of testifying, say Ava Hernández and Steve Wood at Courtroom Sciences.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Amazon's €32M Data Protection Fine Acts As Employer Caveat

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    The recent decision by French data privacy regulator CNIL to fine Amazon for excessive surveillance of its workers opens up a raft of potential employment law, data protection and breach of contract issues, and offers a clear warning that companies need coherent justification for monitoring employees, say Robert Smedley and William Richmond-Coggan at Freeths.

  • Understanding And Working With The Millennials On Your Jury

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    Every trial attorney will be facing a greater proportion of millennials on their jury, as they now comprise the largest generation in the U.S., and winning them over requires an understanding of their views on politics, corporations and damages, says Clint Townson at Townson Litigation Consulting.

  • Vagueness In Calif. Climate Law Makes Compliance Tricky

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    California's recently enacted Voluntary Carbon Market Disclosures Act requires companies making claims of carbon neutrality, or significant greenhouse gas emissions reductions, to disclose information supporting those claims — but vague and conflicting language in the statute poses multiple problems for businesses, say John Rousakis and Chris Bowman at O'Melveny.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • Breaking Down FDIC's New Advertising And Signage Rule

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    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.’s final rule on signage and advertising, coming on the heels of a campaign against nonbank businesses purporting to offer FDIC-insured deposit products, introduces important new requirements and clarifies existing regulations for both traditional depository institutions and novel digital platforms, say attorneys at Venable.

  • Potential Defendant Strategies Amid Calif. Privacy Questions

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    Although the current case law surrounding the California Consumer Privacy Act is in its infancy, courts have begun addressing important issues related to the notice-and-cure provisions of the statute, and these decisions show defendant-businesses would be wise to assert their notice rights early and repeatedly, say Viola Trebicka and Dan Humphrey at Quinn Emanuel.

  • How 2 CFPB Advisory Opinions Affect Reporting Agencies

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    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau issued two advisory opinions last month that demonstrate a continued commitment to address inaccuracies in background check reports and consumer file disclosures through broad interpretation of the Fair Credit Reporting Act, expanding on a coordinated federal agency effort, say attorneys at Cooley.

  • A Close Look At The FCC's Revised SIM Card Fraud Rules

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    Carolyn Mahoney and John Seiver at Davis Wright break down recently proposed revisions to the Federal Communications Commission's customer proprietary network information and local number portability rules for wireless providers, discuss the revisions' implications on artificial intelligence regulation, and provide tips to prevent SIM swap and port-out fraud.

  • What Retailers Should Note In Calif. Web Tracking Suits

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    As retailers face a deluge of class actions alleging the use of conventional web analytic tools violate wiretapping and eavesdropping provisions of the California Invasion of Privacy Act, uncovering the path toward a narrow interpretation of the law will largely depend on how these cases proceed, say Matthew Pearson and Kareem Salem at BakerHostetler.

  • Del. Ruling Adds Momentum For Caremark Plaintiffs

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    The Delaware Supreme Court's recent opinion in Lebanon County Employees' Retirement Fund v. Collis could be viewed as expanding plaintiffs' ability to viably plead a Caremark claim against directors, so Delaware companies should be on heightened alert and focus on creating a record of board oversight, say attorneys at V&E.

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