Cybersecurity & Privacy

  • February 16, 2024

    Unshackled Calif. Privacy Agency To Bring Enforcement Heat

    California's privacy regulator is expected to not waste any time responding to a recent ruling that cleared the way for the fledgling agency to begin immediately enforcing the rules it's crafted under the state's data protection law, making it vital for businesses and employers to adjust their compliance efforts to meet the accelerated timeline. 

  • February 16, 2024

    Samsung Ordered To Arbitrate Hundreds Of BIPA Claims

    An Illinois federal judge has ordered Samsung Electronics to arbitrate 806 customers' biometric-privacy claims and to pay the American Arbitration Association for fees it owes in the slew of disputes, ruling that the company can't refuse to arbitrate under its own binding agreements.

  • February 16, 2024

    Startup Countersues Trucker Tracking Co. For Stealing Tech

    A venture capital-backed startup that sells dashboard cameras to monitor truck drivers is responding to a rival's well-publicized patent infringement case by filing its own patent lawsuit in a different federal court that mirrors many of the same allegations of technological theft but pointing them in the other direction.

  • February 16, 2024

    Nat'l Security Bar Kills Ex-Raytheon Worker's Retaliation Suit

    The Fifth Circuit on Thursday refused to revive an engineer's claims that he was fired by defense contractor Raytheon for raising concerns about a naval system, saying that reviewing the case would implicate the Pentagon's protected decision to revoke his security clearance.

  • February 16, 2024

    PNC Bank Defeats Customer's Suit Over Fraudulent Transfer

    A Pennsylvania federal judge on Friday tossed the two remaining claims in a suit alleging PNC Bank NA misled a California-based customer about stopping a money transfer to a scammer, saying the bank did not breach the account-holder agreement when it tried to recover the customer's funds.

  • February 16, 2024

    Malware Schemer 'Tank' Pleads Guilty To Stealing Millions

    Accused hacker group leader Vyacheslav Igorevich Penchukov, known online as "Tank," pled guilty in Nebraska federal court to charges stemming from two malware schemes Thursday.

  • February 15, 2024

    FTC Seeks To Crack Down On Using AI To Impersonate People

    The Federal Trade Commission on Thursday moved to broaden its recently finalized rule to combat government and business impersonation schemes to also cover scammers that use emerging artificial intelligence tools and other methods to impersonate individuals. 

  • February 15, 2024

    Home Depot, Google Sued Over AI Customer Call Monitoring

    Home Depot and Google were hit with a proposed class action in California federal court Wednesday, accusing them of deploying artificial intelligence technology to surreptitiously "eavesdrop" on calls between customers and Home Depot's representatives without permission, in violation of Golden State privacy laws.

  • February 15, 2024

    X Corp. Nears Toss Of Breach Suit Over 200M Users, For Now

    A California magistrate judge said Thursday she plans to toss a proposed class action alleging the social media giant X Corp. failed to protect the data of 200 million Twitter users whose information was exposed following a data breach, but said she'll let plaintiffs amend the complaint and try again.

  • February 15, 2024

    7th Circ. Rejects Ancestry.com's Arbitration Bid In Privacy Suit

    The Seventh Circuit on Thursday upheld a lower court's decision that minors suing Ancestry.com for sharing their genetic testing information can avoid arbitration, saying there was no language in the terms their parents signed designating the children as parties to the agreement.

  • February 15, 2024

    7th Circ. Questions $4M Samsung Arbitration Fee Order

    The Seventh Circuit seemed skeptical Thursday that more than 35,000 Samsung consumers had enough evidence to prove the telecommunications giant should pay $4 million in individual biometric privacy arbitration fees, as one judge also questioned whether the appeal is properly before the court. 

  • February 15, 2024

    House Committee Blasts VA, Oracle For E-Record Failures

    Lawmakers on Thursday rebuked the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and Oracle Corp. for inadequate fixes to electronic medical records systems that they say continue to threaten the health and safety of thousands of veterans, who are not being advised of the risk.

  • February 15, 2024

    State Dept. Offers $5M For Info On 'BlackCat' Ransomware Group

    The State Department is offering millions for information on the "BlackCat" ransomware, claiming that the AlphV cybercrime group has compromised over 1,000 entities globally.

  • February 15, 2024

    Facebook Users Win Class Status For £2.3B Data Claim

    One year after sending a £2.3 billion ($2.9 billion) proposed class action against Meta Platforms Inc. back to the drawing board, the U.K. Competition Appeal Tribunal has agreed to certify a 44 million-strong class of U.K. consumers who say that the social media titan exploited their data.

  • February 15, 2024

    Wash. Judge Tosses Professors' Email Probe Privacy Suit

    A Washington federal judge has sided with the state in a proposed class action brought by two University of Washington professors seeking to block the state ethics board's director from combing through faculty emails during misconduct investigations, saying the emails are public records because the professors are public employees.

  • February 15, 2024

    GSA Probed For Buying Banned Chinese Conferencing Cams

    The House Oversight Committee's Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Information Technology, and Government Innovation is probing the General Services Administration's purchase of videoconference cameras made in China following a recent report by the GSA's internal watchdog the subcommittee said raised alarming questions.

  • February 15, 2024

    DOJ Says It Disrupted Russian Router Malware Network

    The U.S. Department of Justice said Thursday it had disabled a network of office internet routers that were being used by a Russian intelligence unit to engage in malware campaigns against U.S. and foreign governments as well as military officials and corporations.

  • February 15, 2024

    62 Senators Support Updated Kids Online Safety Act

    A bipartisan group of 62 senators, including Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., announced on Thursday their support for an updated version of the Kids Online Safety Act.

  • February 14, 2024

    Visa Says $5B Swipe Fee Deal Blocks Intuit, Square Claims

    Visa and Mastercard have asked a New York federal court to throw out antitrust claims brought by Intuit and Square, arguing that their claims were released as part of the $5.6 billion class action settlement the credit card companies finalized with merchants last year.

  • February 14, 2024

    9th Circ. Open To Rebooting Suit Over Apple App Crypto Theft

    A Ninth Circuit panel appeared open Wednesday to reviving a putative class action alleging Apple misrepresented the safety of its App Store after users' cryptocurrency was stolen from an app, with two judges questioning why the allegations can't survive when Apple has consistently touted its security in separate antitrust litigation.

  • February 14, 2024

    ​​​​​​​Google's Use Of User Data Quotas Draws 9th Circ. Analogies

    A Ninth Circuit panel Wednesday struggled to find an apt analogy for a property claim made by Android users alleging in a proposed class action that Google illegally uses their purchased data allotments to transmit information back to the company, comparing the intangible data to electricity or an annuity, among other hypotheticals.

  • February 14, 2024

    'Addictive' Tinder, Hinge Apps Break Hearts, V-Day Suit Says

    Match Group intentionally designs its Tinder and Hinge dating apps to be addictive in order to lock users into a "perpetual pay-to-play loop," prioritizing profits over its marketing promises of helping people make romantic connections, according to a proposed class action filed in California federal court on Valentine's Day.

  • February 14, 2024

    FCC Must Distribute School IT Funds, Tech Firms Tell DC Circ.

    Two tech companies are calling on the D.C. Circuit to force the Federal Communications Commission to release funds to pay for information technology and broadband services the firms provide in elementary and secondary schools around the country.

  • February 14, 2024

    FinCEN Head Vows No 'Gotcha' Enforcement Of New Rules

    The director of the U.S. Treasury Department's Financial Crimes Enforcement Network said during a Wednesday congressional hearing that the agency is not pursuing "gotcha" enforcement when it comes to companies complying with new rules for reporting their beneficial ownership information.

  • February 14, 2024

    Mo. Hospital Faces Action Over Breach Of 500K Patients' Data

    A Missouri hospital has been hit with a proposed class action after allegedly taking five months to notify more than 500,000 patients that their sensitive information had been compromised, according to a complaint filed in Missouri federal court.

Expert Analysis

  • What Cos. Can Learn From 2023 Export Enforcement Report

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    A January report summarizing key actions and policy changes undertaken at the Office of Export Enforcement in 2023 is a valuable indicator of future government priorities and the factors companies should consider as they conduct export operations amid what may be a turbulent international trading environment in 2024, says Thaddeus McBride at Bass Berry.

  • How Consumer Product Cos. Can Keep Up With Class Actions

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    Recent cases show California's federal courts and the Ninth Circuit remain the preferred arena for consumers pursuing false advertising and trade deception claims against companies — so manufacturers, distributors and retailers of consumer products should continue to watch these courts for guidance on how to fight class actions, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • What's In NY's Draft Guidance On AI Use In Insurance

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    Last week, the New York State Department of Financial Services released proposed guidance for insurers on the use of artificial intelligence systems and external consumer data and information sources for underwriting and pricing purposes, and these standards will likely help form the basis of an eventual nationwide insurance regulatory framework on AI, say attorneys at Sullivan & Cromwell.

  • Mitigating Compliance And Litigation Risks Of Evolving Tech

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    Amid artificial intelligence and other technological advances, companies must prepare for the associated risks, including a growing suite of privacy regulations, enterprising class action theories and consumer protection challenges, and proliferating disclosure obligations, say attorneys at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • ECJ Ruling Triggers Reconsiderations Of Using AI In Hiring

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    A recent European Court of Justice ruling, clarifying that the General Data Protection Regulation could apply to decisions made by artificial intelligence, serves as a warning to employers, as the use of AI in recruitment may lead to more discrimination claims, say Dino Wilkinson and James Major at Clyde & Co.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • New Tech, Old Tricks: How GCs Can Fight White Collar Crime

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    As emerging technologies like artificial intelligence and cryptocurrency provide bad actors with new avenues to commit classic crimes, general counsel should develop a strategy to future-proof their organizations against such threats and prepare for regulatory scrutiny, say directors at FTI Consulting.

  • 5 AI Risks For Corporate Boards To Examine

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    Whether companies are building their own artificial intelligence technology or leveraging third-party tools, their directors should get educated on certain legal issues and business risks to ensure the adoption of policies that foster responsible use of generative AI, say James Gatto and Tiana Garbett at Sheppard Mullin.

  • How Data Privacy Law Cases Are Evolving In UK, EU And US

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    To see where the law is heading in 2024, it is worth looking at privacy litigation and enforcement trends from last year, where we saw a focus on General Data Protection Regulation regulatory enforcement actions in the U.K. and EU, and class actions brought by private plaintiffs in the U.S., say lawyers at Morgan Lewis.

  • Companies Should Beware Greater Scrutiny Of Subscriptions

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    The New York Attorney General's Office has been utilizing a severe interpretation of the law in enforcement against subscription services, as demonstrated in last month's Sirius XM complaint and Cerebral settlement — and this focus is representative of heightened subscription scrutiny in other states and at the federal level, say attorneys at Venable.

  • Uncharted Waters Ahead For FCA Litigation In 2024

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    Following a year of significant court decisions, settlements, recoveries and proposed amendments, 2024 promises to be a lively year for False Claims Act actions and litigation, and one that will hopefully provide more clarity as FCA jurisprudence evolves, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • Takeaways From FTC Children's Privacy Rule Proposal

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    The Federal Trade Commission’s recently issued and long-awaited proposed revisions to its Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule are not as seismic as might have been expected under current leadership, and show that the agency's COPPA rulemaking is far from over, says Phyllis Marcus at Hunton.

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