Delaware

  • February 08, 2024

    Canadian News Co.'s US Entities Lose Ch. 15 Recognition Bid

    Three Chapter 15 debtors that publish local newspapers in Hawaii and Washington failed to receive Chapter 15 recognition Thursday, after a Delaware bankruptcy judge found they have strong ties to the U.S. and virtually no meaningful connection to their Canadian parent company.

  • February 08, 2024

    Del. Chancery Questions Broker's 'Ornate' Board Control Fix

    Bylaw amendments adopted by insurance broker BRP Group Inc. in response to a shareholder's complaint that its co-founders wielded too much control over the company's board may have "narrowed" the problem but did not necessarily eliminate it, a Delaware Chancery Court vice chancellor said Thursday at a hearing in Wilmington.

  • February 08, 2024

    Rockport Asks Judge To Dismiss Ch. 11 After $52M Asset Sale

    Defunct-shoemaker The Rockport Co. asked a Delaware bankruptcy judge to dismiss its Chapter 11 case, saying that it has no remaining assets of value after using more than $52 million in sale proceeds to pay down senior secured obligations.

  • February 08, 2024

    Lucky Bucks Ch. 7 Trustee Seeks Docs About $237M Payout

    A Delaware bankruptcy judge should let the liquidating trustee for bankrupt gambling machine operator Lucky Bucks Holdings LLC examine its former subsidiary to evaluate whether he can recover anything related to over $237 million in allegedly fraudulent transfers to insiders, the trustee told the court.

  • February 08, 2024

    Creditors Say Don't Reorder Priority Scheme In Citgo Auction

    Creditors of Venezuela that are favorably positioned to recoup billions of dollars they're collectively owed in an upcoming auction for control of U.S. oil giant Citgo urged a Delaware federal judge on Wednesday not to grant a hedge fund's request for a "more equitable" distribution of the proceeds.

  • February 08, 2024

    Investors Sue In Del. For Cartesian Therapeutics Vote Hold

    Stockholders of early-stage biotech venture Cartesian Therapeutics Inc. sought a Delaware Court of Chancery order Wednesday to enjoin a meeting on a planned post-merger stock conversion and reverse split, pending additional disclosures on equity valuations.

  • February 08, 2024

    Kidde-Fenwal's Ch. 11 Fee Examiner OKs $20.4M For 15 Firms

    The fee examiner appointed in fire-suppression company Kidde-Fenwal's Chapter 11 case has recommended that a Delaware bankruptcy judge approve $20.4 million in pay for 15 firms working on the proceedings, after they agreed to cut their requested compensation by about $333,000.

  • February 08, 2024

    These Firms Are Leading In Patent Litigation Work

    A Houston-based intellectual property firm filed the most patent suits over the last three years in the U.S., while a well-established boutique again took the top spot as the firm defending the most patent litigation during the same period, according to a new Lex Machina report.

  • February 08, 2024

    These Firms Are Leading In PTAB Work

    An intellectual property heavyweight landed more work at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board than any other firm in the U.S. between 2021 and 2023, according to a new report.

  • February 08, 2024

    Oracle Stockholders Lose Bid For $5M 'Mootness' Fee

    The Delaware Chancery Court has denied a $5 million attorney fee request by Oracle stockholders who lost a lawsuit that alleged the software giant overpaid for its $9.3 billion acquisition of Netsuite, rejecting the investors' contention that they deserve an award for prompting the company to appoint two new independent directors.

  • February 08, 2024

    Del. Justices Say Healthcare Co. Must Pay Ex-CEO's Fees

    The Delaware Supreme Court affirmed a Chancery Court decision ordering a medical claims management company to pay the legal fees of its ex-CEO after he was found liable for breaching his fiduciary duties.

  • February 08, 2024

    Justices Rule Gov't Agencies Not Immune From FCRA Suits

    The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Thursday that a person can sue a government agency under the Fair Credit Reporting Act, because the law's 1970 definition of a "person" was sufficient to waive the government's immunity.

  • February 08, 2024

    Deal In Renovation Row Should've Been In Writing, Attys Told

    A Delaware Superior Court judge has offered a cautionary lesson to counsel representing a construction company that contended it had reached an enforceable agreement with a homeowner in a renovation dispute: You should have gotten the deal in writing.

  • February 07, 2024

    Hose Co. Says Patent Battle Raises Ethical Questions

    A company that sells flexible, retractable hoses has told the director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office that a rival's latest legal maneuver in their decadelong patent war "presents a substantial threat to the integrity of the patent system."

  • February 07, 2024

    EDTX Eclipses WDTX As Top Patent Venue

    The Eastern District of Texas in 2023 surpassed the state's Western District as the most popular venue for patent litigation nationally, now that patent cases are no longer automatically assigned to a prominent judge in Waco, according to new data from Lex Machina.

  • February 07, 2024

    New Patent Suits Fall To Lowest Level In Over A Decade

    There were fewer patent suits filed in 2023 than in any year for over a decade, a drop that attorneys attribute to wariness among some patent litigants due to funding disclosure rules in one prominent patent venue and changes in how cases are assigned to judges in another.

  • February 07, 2024

    Young KC Chiefs Fan's Parents Sue Deadspin For Defamation

    The parents of a 9-year-old Kansas City Chiefs fan who's Native American have hit sports news publication Deadspin with a defamation lawsuit in Delaware state court accusing it of using a photo of their son, wearing a feather headdress and red and black face paint at a game, out of context in order to label the family "bigots" who hate both Black and Native American people.

  • February 07, 2024

    6th Circ. Won't Rehear Fight Over FERC's Price-Cap Rule

    The Sixth Circuit on Wednesday declined to rehear its December price cap ruling that power supplier groups said is being misconstrued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to argue that the D.C. Circuit's ability to act on related litigation is limited.

  • February 07, 2024

    Longford Argues Patent Settlement Row Must Be Arbitrated

    Litigation funder Longford Capital has asked a Delaware federal court to send its dispute over a settlement with Arigna Technology Ltd. to arbitration, saying the arbitration agreement between the two parties is valid despite the Irish patent holding company's claims otherwise.

  • February 07, 2024

    ​​​​​​​Full Del. High Court Asked To Revive $1.2B Crypto Merger

    Cryptocurrency wallet provider BitGo deserves the chance to go to trial with digital assets firm Galaxy Digital over their broken $1.2 billion merger because the dispute involves complex questions of administrative, agency and securities laws, as well as regulatory guidance, BitGo told Delaware's highest court Wednesday.

  • February 07, 2024

    NGL Deal Adviser Urges Del. Justices To Uphold $36M Verdict

    An attorney for LCT Capital told Delaware's Supreme Court on Wednesday that a $36 million Delaware jury verdict favoring the institutional broker-adviser in a merger services dispute with NGL Energy Partners should carry "enormous" weight on its second appeal despite client protests.

  • February 07, 2024

    Matterport Stockholders Say Officials Wrongly Cashed $225M

    Shareholders of 3D model maker Matterport Inc. accused top company officials in Delaware Chancery Court of self-dealing by paying themselves performance rewards following a 2021 merger, even though the company hadn't met benchmarks to allow them to cash out $225 million in shares.

  • February 07, 2024

    3rd Circ. Says Bankruptcy Claim Didn't Break Small Loan Law

    The Third Circuit said Wednesday that a debt collector didn't violate a law prohibiting extortionate rates on small loans by seeking to collect the balance of a man's debts through a claim in his bankruptcy after it had been written off by his original lender.

  • February 07, 2024

    GOP Sens. Probe 3rd Circ. Pick's Ties To Rutgers Program

    Republicans on the Senate Judiciary Committee are looking into a Rutgers Law School program at the center of their objections to the president's nominee for the Third Circuit, who would be the first Muslim federal appeals court judge if confirmed.

  • February 07, 2024

    Del. Justices Uphold Clovis Holdings Cash-Drain Claims

    The Delaware Supreme Court on Wednesday upheld, without elaboration, a Chancery Court award of nearly $7.8 million in damages, fees and prejudgment interest to the sole investor in a stone powder-based paper investment venture that was allegedly drained of cash by insiders.

Expert Analysis

  • Handling Religious Objections To Abortion-Related Job Duties

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    While health care and pharmacy employee religious exemption requests concerning abortion-related procedures or drugs are not new, recent cases demonstrate why employer accommodation considerations should factor in the Title VII standard set forth by the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2023 Groff v. DeJoy ruling, as well as applicable federal, state and local laws, say attorneys at Epstein Becker.

  • Co. Directors Must Beware Dangers Of Reverse Factoring

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    New accounting requirements governing the disclosure of so-called reverse-factoring programs have revealed billions of dollars worth of hidden liabilities on companies’ ledgers, and directors of corporate boards should review their companies’ books for this hidden danger, say Garland Kelley at Looper Goodwine, Amin Al-Sarraf at Locke Lord and Jill Basinger at Discovery Land.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

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    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

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    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • What Whistleblowing Trends Mean For Securities Litigation

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    A recent survey on whistleblowing-related topics suggests several valuable lessons for companies to consider regarding securities and shareholder litigation, and underscores the need to implement and advertise robust whistleblowing policies to employees, say attorneys at Freshfields.

  • Del. Dispatch: Lessons From Failed ETE-Williams Merger

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    Attorneys at Fried Frank delve into the Delaware Supreme Court's recent decision in Energy Transfer v. Williams to highlight the major monetary consequences of a failed merger, and show why merger agreement drafting and factual context are of utmost importance.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

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    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

  • Why Delaware ABCs Are No Longer As Easy As 1-2-3

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    In light of the Court of Chancery's recent focus on additional disclosures, the assignment for the benefit of creditors process in Delaware may no longer be as efficient as it once was, and companies should be prepared to provide significantly more information leading up to an ABC, say attorneys at Goodwin.

  • Series

    Playing In A Rock Cover Band Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Performing in a classic rock cover band has driven me to hone several skills — including focus, organization and networking — that have benefited my professional development, demonstrating that taking time to follow your muse outside of work can be a boon to your career, says Michael Gambro at Cadwalader.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Espinosa On 'Lincoln Lawyer'

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    The murder trials in Netflix’s “The Lincoln Lawyer” illustrate the stark contrast between the ethical high ground that fosters and maintains the criminal justice system's integrity, and the ethical abyss that can undermine it, with an important reminder for all legal practitioners, say Judge Adam Espinosa and Andrew Howard at the Colorado 2nd Judicial District Court.

  • How Del. 'Arising Out Of' Ruling May Affect Insurance Cases

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    The Delaware Supreme Court decision in Ace American Insurance v. Guaranteed Rate focused on a professional services exclusion, but the ruling has wide-ranging application in insurance coverage disputes involving any exclusions that employ "arising out of" or similar prefatory language, say Keith McKenna and Maria Brinkmann at Cohen Ziffer.

  • Balancing Justice And Accountability In Opioid Bankruptcies

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    As Rite Aid joins other pharmaceutical companies in pursuing bankruptcy following the onslaught of state and federal litigation related to the opioid epidemic, courts and the country will have to reconcile the ideals of economic justice and accountability against the U.S. Constitution’s promise of a fresh start through bankruptcy, says Monique Hayes at DGIM Law.

  • Unearthing The Lesser-Known 'Buried Facts' Doctrine

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    A New York federal judge’s recent suggestion that the “buried facts” doctrine may be applicable in the fraud trial of FTX cofounder Sam Bankman-Fried should serve as a reminder to attorneys in all kinds of cases involving corporate disclosures that this lesser-known rule could torpedo their defense, say Corban Rhodes and Li Yu at DiCello Levitt.

  • Opinion

    Newman Suspension Shows Need For Judicial Reform

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    The recent suspension of U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman following her alleged refusal to participate in a disability inquiry reveals the need for judicial misconduct reforms to ensure that judges step down when they can no longer serve effectively, says Aliza Shatzman at The Legal Accountability Project.

  • 9th Circ. Ruling Expands The Horizons Of Debt Discharge

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    The Ninth Circuit Bankruptcy Appellate Panel’s recent ruling in RS Air v. NetJets demonstrates that creditors should not be quick to conclude that their recoveries are limited if a debtor commences bankruptcy and receives a discharge, and should instead consider other potential paths for recovery, like alter ego claims, say Dania Slim and Claire Wu at Pillsbury.

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