Employment

  • April 17, 2024

    NLRB Judge Told Of College Hoopsters' Hotel Curfew Guard

    A Stanford University runner testified on Wednesday for the National Labor Relations Board that some student-athletes should be considered employees due to the control programs exert over them, and that a time he encountered a hotel curfew guard for a Division I basketball team highlights how tight that control can be.

  • April 17, 2024

    Wells Fargo Headed To Trial In Ex-Exec's COVID-Era ADA Suit

    Wells Fargo is headed to trial over a former investment director's Americans with Disabilities Act claim in a suit alleging he lost his job following an accommodation request after his employer prepared to mandate a return to office, with a North Carolina federal judge also trimming the former employee's age discrimination suit.

  • April 17, 2024

    NC Justices Fear UNC Doc Wants 'Dramatic' Immunity Expansion

    The North Carolina Supreme Court expressed concern Wednesday over a "dramatic" broadening of public official immunity if they accepted the arguments of a University of North Carolina doctor looking to escape a defamation lawsuit alleging he made up accusations to incite a vindictive investigation into a going away party for a subordinate.

  • April 17, 2024

    SpaceX's NLRB Suit Stays In Calif. After 5th Circ. Deadlock

    SpaceX's challenge to the National Labor Relations Board's constitutionality will be heard in California federal court after the full Fifth Circuit deadlocked Wednesday on the company's bid for review of a panel decision letting the suit's transfer from Texas stand.

  • April 17, 2024

    Lab Whistleblower Drops COVID Test Suit After Feds Pass

    An ex-lab director has dropped his False Claims Act lawsuit alleging he was ousted from a diagnostic testing firm for raising concerns about regulatory violations and improper billing of federal health care programs, closing his Washington federal court case just days after the government declined to intervene.

  • April 17, 2024

    Biden Admin Probes Chinese Shipbuilders For Unfair Trade

    The Biden administration launched an investigation Wednesday into whether China used unfair practices to gain a competitive edge in the global shipping and maritime services sector, setting the stage for potential new tariffs against Beijing.

  • April 17, 2024

    Fired Whistleblowers' Right To Sue Vital, Mich. Justices Hear

    A former Fiat Chrysler plant employee told a mostly quiet Michigan Supreme Court on Wednesday that state regulators should not be his only option for recourse after he was terminated, allegedly for reporting a workplace safety concern, arguing that Michigan workers will be hung out to dry if they can't bring their own lawsuits against employers.

  • April 17, 2024

    Port Authority Worker Takes Race Bias Suit To 3rd Circ.

    A Black woman who claimed the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey didn't promote her because of her race and complaints about discrimination told the Third Circuit on Wednesday that a lower court ignored facts that should have worked in her favor when it dismissed her lawsuit.

  • April 17, 2024

    Seattle Says Firefighters' Amended Vax Complaint Still Flawed

    The city of Seattle insisted Wednesday that fatal flaws remain in an amended complaint from firefighters who sued over the city's COVID-19 vaccine mandate, including a failure to link religious discrimination and due process claims to Seattle Fire Chief Harold Scoggins and other named defendants.

  • April 17, 2024

    Colo. Labor Dept. Says Amazon's Holiday Pay Must Be In OT

    The Colorado Department of Labor and Employment told the state Supreme Court that Amazon's holiday incentive pay is similar to shift differentials, backing warehouse workers' arguments that the pay should have been included in their overtime compensation.

  • April 17, 2024

    Fox Rothschild Hires Employment Atty In Atlantic City

    Fox Rothschild LLP has added a labor and employment partner with decades of experience in collective bargaining, resolving workplace disputes and risk management to its Atlantic City, New Jersey, office.

  • April 17, 2024

    Ex-Union Leader Wielded 'Financial Ruin' At Jobsite, Jury Told

    Prosecutors told a federal jury Wednesday that ex-Philadelphia labor leader John Dougherty threatened a jobsite manager with "financial ruin" if the man refused to pay his nephew, Gregory Fiocca, despite spotty attendance during the construction of the Live! Casino.

  • April 17, 2024

    School District To Pay $200K To End EEOC Age Bias Suit

    An Illinois school district will pay about $206,000 to bring an end to a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit claiming it capped salary increases for teachers over 45 to dodge increased retirement payments, the agency said Wednesday.

  • April 17, 2024

    Managing Partner Pilfered Exiting Atty's Gmail, Regulator Says

    The managing partner of a six-attorney Hartford, Connecticut, personal injury and employment law firm threatened to gin up a criminal probe and ordered downloads from the personal Gmail account of a departing attorney, according to a post-trial brief by disciplinary authorities seeking the partner's one-year suspension.

  • April 17, 2024

    WashU Medical School Settles Claims Of Asylee Bias, Firing

    The Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has settled claims that it fired a worker who complained that he was being forced to prove he held asylum, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • April 17, 2024

    Lewis Brisbois Adds Employment Pro From Fisher Phillips

    Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP announced Wednesday it has brought aboard a new partner to lead the Denver branch of its national labor and employment practice who has more than 10 years of law firm experience, most recently at Fisher Phillips.

  • April 17, 2024

    Ogletree Expands Into Western NY With Ex-Goldberg Atty

    Management-side employment firm Ogletree Deakins is expanding into western New York, announcing Tuesday that it is adding a shareholder in Buffalo from Goldberg Segalla.

  • April 17, 2024

    Welch's Rehire Challenge Should Fail, Judge Recommends

    Welch Foods should comply with an arbitrator's order to rehire a Teamsters-represented worker fired for making vulgar comments to a female co-worker, a Pennsylvania federal magistrate judge said, recommending that the district judge toss the company's challenge to the order.

  • April 17, 2024

    Tesla To Vote On Reviving Musk's $55B Pay, Moving To Texas

    Attorneys for Tesla Inc. notified Delaware's chancellor Wednesday that the company will seek stockholder approval June 13 for the same $55.8 billion Elon Musk compensation plan voided by Chancery Court on Jan. 30, along with reincorporation of Tesla as a Texas company.

  • April 17, 2024

    IBM Privacy Head Says AI Needs Transparency To Be Trusted

    To combat artificial intelligence-generated deepfakes, disinformation and bias requires transparent, open-sourced AI models and swift regulations that protect elections, creators and the public, says IBM's Chief Privacy & Trust Officer Christina Montgomery.

  • April 17, 2024

    Fisher Phillips Adds Longtime Littler Atty In Ohio

    A longtime Littler Mendelson PC attorney has joined international labor and employment firm Fisher Phillips as a partner in its Cleveland office.

  • April 17, 2024

    Justices Ease Pathway For Title VII Suits Over Job Transfers

    The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits discriminatory job transfers even if they don't come with significant harm, a declaration that clears the way for more workplace bias suits to move ahead.

  • April 16, 2024

    Al Roker Fired Producer For Supporting DEI Policy, Suit Says

    Television producer William Schultz has sued Al Roker and his production company in New York federal court, alleging that he was wrongfully fired from the show "Weather Hunters" after voicing support for an initiative to bring minority writers onto the PBS children's show.

  • April 16, 2024

    Caitlin Clark's WNBA Leap Set To Pay Off, Lift Women's Sports

    Although the first-year WNBA salary of Caitlin Clark will be relatively meager, she is in no financial straits because of dramatic changes to the laws and rules governing college athletes' ability to earn money in recent years, and experts say Clark's ascension is lifting up all of women's sports.

  • April 16, 2024

    Russell Simmons Says Rape Accuser Already Settled In 1997

    A lawyer for hip-hop mogul and Def Jam Recordings co-founder Russell Simmons told a Manhattan federal judge Tuesday that a 1997 settlement agreement and release bars a former label executive from pursuing her rape claims in court.

Expert Analysis

  • The Future Of BIPA Insurance Litigation After Visual Pak

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    A recent Illinois appellate court decision, National Fire Insurance v. Visual Pak, may have altered the future of insurance litigation under the state's Biometric Information Privacy Act by diametrically opposing a prominent Seventh Circuit ruling that found insurance coverage for violations of the act, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Inside OMB's Update On Race And Ethnicity Data Collection

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    The Office of Management and Budget's new guidelines for agency collection of data on race and ethnicity reflect societal changes and the concerns of certain demographics, but implementation may be significantly burdensome for agencies and employers, say Joanna Colosimo and Bill Osterndorf at DCI Consulting.

  • Assessing Work Rules After NLRB Handbook Ruling

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    The National Labor Relations Board's Stericycle decision last year sparked uncertainty surrounding whether historically acceptable work rules remain lawful — but employers can use a two-step analysis to assess whether to implement a given rule and how to do so in a compliant manner, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

  • Series

    Whitewater Kayaking Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Whether it's seeing clients and their issues from a new perspective, or staying nimble in a moment of intense challenge, the lessons learned from whitewater kayaking transcend the rapids of a river and prepare attorneys for the courtroom and beyond, says Matthew Kent at Alston & Bird.

  • New Wash. Laws Employers Should Pay Attention To

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    The Washington Legislature ended its session last month after passing substantial laws that should prompt employers to spring into action — including a broadened equal pay law to cover classes beyond gender, narrowed sick leave payment requirements for construction workers and protections for grocery workers after a merger, say Hannah Ard and Alayna Piwonski at Lane Powell.

  • Cannabis Ruling Lights Path For Bankruptcy Protection

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    A recent Massachusetts bankruptcy appellate court ruling in Blumsack v. Harrington leaves the door open for those employed in the cannabis industry to seek bankruptcy relief where certain conditions are met, but rescheduling marijuana as a Schedule III drug may complicate matters, say Jane Haviland and Kathryn Droumbakis at Mintz.

  • This Earth Day, Consider How Your Firm Can Go Greener

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    As Earth Day approaches, law firms and attorneys should consider adopting more sustainable practices to reduce their carbon footprint — from minimizing single-use plastics to purchasing carbon offsets for air travel — which ultimately can also reduce costs for clients, say M’Lynn Phillips and Lisa Walters at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • The Shifting Landscape Of Physician Disciplinary Proceedings

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    Though hospitals have historically been able to terminate doctors' medical staff privileges without fear of court interference, recent case law has demonstrated that the tides are turning, especially when there is evidence of unlawful motivations, say Dylan Newton and Michael Horn at Archer & Greiner.

  • Opinion

    Anti-DEI Complaints Filed With EEOC Carry No Legal Weight

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    Recently filed complaints against several companies' diversity, equity and inclusion programs alleging unlawful discrimination against white people do not require a response from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and should not stop employers from rooting out ongoing discriminatory practices, says former EEOC general counsel David Lopez.

  • Circumstantial Evidence Requires A Pointillist Approach

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    Because complex cases with sophisticated defendants are unlikely to reveal much, if any, direct evidence, attorneys must aggregate many pieces of circumstantial evidence into a cohesive narrative — much like the painting technique of pointillism, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • A Look At Global Employee Disconnect Laws For US Counsel

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    As countries worldwide adopt employee right to disconnect laws, U.S. in-house counsel at corporations with a global workforce must develop a comprehensive understanding of the laws' legal and cultural implications, ensuring their companies can safeguard employee welfare while maintaining legal compliance, say Emma Corcoran and Ute Krudewagen at DLA Piper.

  • How DEI Programs Are Being Challenged In Court And Beyond

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    In the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's affirmative action decision last year declaring the consideration of race in university admissions unconstitutional, employers should keep abreast of recent litigation challenging diversity, equity and inclusion training programs, as well as legislation both supporting and opposing DEI initiatives in the workplace, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • What Minority Biz Law Ruling Could Mean For Private DEI

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    A Texas federal court’s recent decision to strike down key provisions of the Minority Business Development Act illustrates the wide-reaching effects of the U.S. Supreme Court's 2023 Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard decision across legal contexts, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Employers Beware Of NLRB Changes On Bad Faith Bargaining

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    Recent National Labor Relations Board decisions show a trend of the agency imposing harsher remedies on employers for bad faith bargaining over union contracts, a position upheld in the Ninth Circuit's recent NLRB v. Grill Concepts Services decision, says Daniel Johns at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Practicing Law With Parkinson's Disease

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    This Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Adam Siegler at Greenberg Traurig discusses his experience working as a lawyer with Parkinson’s disease, sharing both lessons on how to cope with a diagnosis and advice for supporting colleagues who live with the disease.

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