Labor

  • April 03, 2024

    Amazon Cut Strikers' Time Off, NLRB Regional Director Claims

    Amazon violated federal labor law by dinging workers' time-off balances in retaliation for them going on strike at a facility in Shakopee, Minnesota, the National Labor Relations Board's Minneapolis regional director alleged.

  • April 03, 2024

    Trader Joe's Made Threats During Union Drive, NLRB GC Says

    National Labor Relations Board prosecutors accused Trader Joe's of violating federal labor law by threatening and interrogating workers in the midst of an organizing drive at a California store, according to a complaint obtained by Law360 on Wednesday.

  • April 03, 2024

    Groups Fight DOL's Bid To Toss Suit Challenging Wage Rule

    A pair of construction industry trade groups urged a Texas federal court to preserve their challenge to a U.S. Department of Labor rule that revises prevailing wage calculations for federally funded projects, arguing that the rule injures both them and the firms they represent.

  • April 03, 2024

    3rd Circ. Judge Wonders If Philly Union Rule Dispute Is Moot

    A Third Circuit judge on Wednesday wondered whether a former Philadelphia mayor's order requiring contractors to pay dues to "city-approved" unions was now moot, given the new administration's assurances that it won't be implemented, as contractors urged the court to find that the scrapped rule should be banned by law.

  • April 03, 2024

    14 AGs Urge DOL To Seek More Payroll Info From Contractors

    Contractors performing construction, alteration or repair work on government buildings should have to give the U.S. Department of Labor more detailed information about the deductions they take from workers' wages, a coalition of Democratic state attorneys general told the agency in a letter publicized Wednesday.

  • April 03, 2024

    NLRB Fights Theater Co.'s Confidentiality Claims At 2nd Circ.

    A theatrical production company can't assert confidentiality to duck information requests from Actors' Equity Association, the National Labor Relations Board told the Second Circuit, urging it to affirm a board decision finding that the company unlawfully refused to provide financial details.

  • April 03, 2024

    Closed Walgreens Pharmacy In Oregon Avoids Union For Now

    A Walgreens in Oregon that closed its pharmacy the day its pharmacist and pharmacy technicians announced their union organizing campaign doesn't have to hold a union representation election, a National Labor Relations Board official said, saying the union can request an election again if the pharmacy reopens.

  • April 02, 2024

    3rd Circ. Preview: Black Lung, Back Pay On Tap In April

    The Third Circuit this month will consider Keystone Coal Mining Co.'s contention that a lower court erred in deeming a miner's black lung a "total disability," while a shuttered rehabilitation facility has asked the court to undo the National Labor Relations Board's determination that it owes unionized employees back pay and bonuses for work done during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • April 02, 2024

    Bills Tying Incentives To Card Check Could Be Preempted

    Southern state legislatures recently have shown an interest in bills that would bar businesses that receive state economic incentives from voluntarily recognizing unions based on authorization cards, and experts expect the concept to spread even as questions remain about whether such measures are preempted by federal labor law.

  • April 02, 2024

    Transportation Department Finalizes New Train Crew Size Rule

    The U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Railroad Administration on Tuesday finalized a rule requiring freight trains to be operated with at least two people, forging ahead with a mandate long supported by rail workers' unions and safety advocates, but one that major rail carriers have decried as unnecessary and costly.

  • April 02, 2024

    Worker In NLRB GC's Rules Remedy Case Asks For Atty Fees

    A worker requested attorney fees and costs as a make-whole remedy in an unfair labor practice case in which the NLRB's general counsel pushed for broadened relief in work rule disputes, arguing that he had to hire private counsel in his challenge to a mortgage lender's employment agreement.

  • April 02, 2024

    4 Mass. Rulings You May Have Missed In March

    A former Harvard Business School professor who was denied tenure after his angry emails to a restaurant went viral was among the winners from a slate of recent Massachusetts state court decisions, which also addressed claims about "forever chemicals" in firefighting gear and a popular gym shut down during the pandemic.

  • April 02, 2024

    $40M Union Pension Dispute To Head Back To Arbitrator

    A Michigan federal judge stood firm on his decision to send a roughly $40 million dispute between a demolition company and a union pension fund back to an arbitrator, rejecting the company's bid for him to reconsider his opinion.

  • April 02, 2024

    Calif. Bill Would Provide After-Hours 'Right To Disconnect'

    A California state lawmaker has introduced a first-of-its-kind bill that would give workers the right to ignore emails, text messages and phone calls from their employers after they clock out.

  • April 02, 2024

    Scholars Back Lower Bar For NLRB Injunction At High Court

    A group of labor law professors defended the National Labor Relations Board's ability to dodge certain injunction requirements placed on private parties in a brief to the U.S. Supreme Court, recommending the justices side with the agency over Starbucks in a dispute about how the NLRB obtains injunctions.

  • April 02, 2024

    Plastics Co. Asks 3rd Circ. To Back Order Denying Rehire

    A plastics manufacturer called on the Third Circuit to uphold an arbitration award that denied reinstatement to a fired worker in Delaware, contending that the arbitrator correctly used an evidentiary doctrine to block a rehire remedy because the company found out the worker was intoxicated after his termination.

  • April 02, 2024

    Philly Uber Class Action Atty Heads To Lichten & Liss-Riordan

    One of the attorneys representing a proposed class of Philadelphia Uber drivers in their wage suit against the company left the Steel City's Pietragallo Gordon Alfano Bosick & Raspanti LLP for the new New Jersey office of Lichten & Liss-Riordan PC, his co-counsel in the ride-hailing case.

  • April 01, 2024

    Union, Workers Must Comply With Starbucks' Subpoenas

    Workers United and a fired Starbucks employee must comply with subpoenas seeking information about workers' sentiments toward the union at a Long Island cafe following the worker's termination, a New York magistrate judge ruled, finding no confidentiality concerns.

  • April 01, 2024

    Bankrupt Coal Co.'s Affiliates Beat $6.5B Union Pension Suit

    A bankrupt coal company's affiliates have dodged claims that they owe $6.5 billion to a union pension plan, with a Washington, D.C., federal judge holding that the plan's trustees lacked standing to sue under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act because one trustee wasn't properly appointed.

  • April 01, 2024

    Right-Wing Personality Hit With Severance Charge At NLRB

    Conservative media personality Steven Crowder was hit with a National Labor Relations Board charge alleging he's leaning on an illegal separation agreement in a suit to stop an ex-producer from speaking out about him.

  • April 01, 2024

    Union Backs USPS In Bias Suit That Went To High Court

    A Christian postal worker who claimed he was unlawfully punished for seeking Sundays off should lose his religious bias case under the standard the U.S. Supreme Court set when it revived his case in 2023, a letter carriers union told a Pennsylvania federal judge.

  • April 01, 2024

    Carlton Fields Adds Stearns Weaver Employment Pro In Fla.

    Carlton Fields PA has added a labor and employment attorney from Stearns Weaver Miller as of counsel in its Tampa office, the firm announced Monday.

  • April 01, 2024

    NLRB Awards Disputed Seattle Port Work To ILWU

    Workers represented by the International Longshore and Warehouse Union are entitled to perform certain work at a port terminal in Seattle, the National Labor Relations Board ruled, rejecting the International Association of Machinists' bid for its members to take on the work.

  • April 01, 2024

    NLRB Official Tosses OPEIU's Election Bid At Consulting Co.

    A National Labor Relations Board official denied a petition from an Office and Professional Employees International Union affiliate to hold an election to represent workers at a consulting firm, saying the characteristics of workers who would be included and excluded from the proposed bargaining unit aren't clearly delineated.

  • April 01, 2024

    UNITE HERE President Steps Down After 11 Years

    The president of UNITE HERE has stepped down after 11 years of leading a union that represents 300,000 workers, the union announced Monday.

Expert Analysis

  • Starbucks 'Memphis 7' Ruling Shows Retaliation Is A Bad Idea

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    Starbucks’ unsuccessful attempts to quash unionization by retaliating against organizing employees — illustrated by the Sixth Circuit's recent backing of an order that forced the company to rehire seven pro-union workers in Memphis, Tennessee — demonstrates why employers should eschew hard-line tactics and instead foster genuine dialogue with their workforce, says Janette Levey at Levey Law.

  • 3 Employer Considerations In Light Of DOL Proposed OT Rule

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    A recently unveiled rule from the U.S. Department of Labor would increase the salary threshold for Fair Labor Standards Act overtime exemptions, and while the planned changes are not the law just yet, employers should start thinking about the best ways to position their organizations for compliance in the future, say Brodie Erwin and Sarah Spangenburg at Kilpatrick.

  • Employers, Buckle Up For Fast-Track NLRB Election Rules

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    Under the National Labor Relations Board's recent changes to its secret ballot election rules, employers will face short timelines and deferral of many legal issues — so they would be well advised to develop robust plans to address these developments now, say attorneys at Baker Donelson.

  • Key Strike Considerations For Automotive Industry Suppliers

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    As the UAW's labor contracts with Detroit's Big Three automakers expire, and the possibility of a strike looms, automotive industry suppliers face a number of possible legal and operational issues — and should have strategic action plans in place to deal with contracts, liquidity, the post-strike environment and more, say experts at Alvarez & Marsal.

  • Transaction Risks In Residential Mortgage M&A Due Diligence

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    As the residential mortgage market continues to consolidate due to interest rate increases and low housing volume, buyers and sellers should pay attention to a number of compliance considerations ranging from fair lending laws to employee classification, say attorneys at Mayer Brown.

  • NLRB GC Brief Portends Hefty Labor Law Transformation

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    In just one recent brief, the National Labor Relations Board’s general counsel asked the board to overturn at least five precedents, providing a detailed map of where the law may change in the near future, including union-friendly shifts in rules for captive audience meetings and work email use, says Daniel Johns at Cozen O'Connor.

  • New NLRB Union Rules Require Proactive Employer Response

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    Because recent radical changes to National Labor Relations Board unionization rules, decided in the case of Cemex Construction Materials, may speed up elections or result in more mandatory bargaining orders, employers should make several significant, practical edits to their playbooks for navigating union organizing and certification, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Eye On Compliance: Women's Soccer Puts Equal Pay In Focus

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    As the U.S. Women's National Team returns from World Cup, employers can honor the fighting spirit of the athletes — which won them a historic gender pay equality settlement in 2022 — by reviewing federal equal pay compliance requirements and committing to a level playing field for all genders, says Christina Heischmidt at Wilson Elser.

  • Joint Employer Considerations After NLRB's Google Ruling

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    Following the National Labor Relations Board's recent decision that Google is a joint employer of its independent contractor's employees, Matthew Green and Daniel Unterburger at Obermayer Rebmann offer practice tips to help companies preemptively assess the risks and broader implications of the decision to engage contractors.

  • What's Notable In Connecticut's New Cannabis Laws

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    The Connecticut Legislature recently passed four bills containing cannabis provisions — ranging from applicable tax credits to labor agreement requirements — that may prove to be a mixed bag for state operators, say Sarah Westby and Deanna McWeeney at Shipman & Goodwin.

  • Employer Use Of Electronic Monitoring Is Not An OSHA Issue

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    A recent Law360 guest article asserted that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration must begin work on regulating electronic monitoring of employee performance because it can contribute to higher rates of injuries and mental stress, but electronic monitoring simply is not a recognized hazard, says Lawrence Halprin at Keller and Heckman.

  • Takeaways From NLRB's New Workplace Rule Standards

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    Following a recent National Labor Relations Board decision that allows for increased scrutiny of workplace rules, employers will want to analyze whether any policies could reasonably dissuade employees from engaging in concerted activity, as the bar for proving a legitimate business interest has been raised, say attorneys at Taft Stettinius.

  • Water Cooler Talk: 'The Bear' Serves Up Advice For Managers

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper chat with Ernst & Young’s Laura Yehuda about Hulu's "The Bear" and the best practices managers can glean from the show's portrayal of workplace challenges, including those faced by young, female managers.

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