Labor

  • February 22, 2024

    9th Circ. OKs NLRB's Dues Stance, But Judge Decries Shifts

    A Ninth Circuit panel handed the National Labor Relations Board a pair of victories in a dispute over union dues, holding that valid dues authorization forms can be worded in a variety of ways and that employers can't suddenly stop deducting dues when a union contract expires.

  • February 22, 2024

    UAW Tells Mich. Judge To Toss Fiduciary Duty Suit

    The United Auto Workers and one of its affiliates urged a Michigan federal judge to dismiss accusations that the union violated its fiduciary duty in connection with an individual's claim for benefits, saying federal retirement and labor laws preempt the plaintiff's allegations.

  • February 22, 2024

    Longshore Union To Exit Bankruptcy With $20M Settlement

    A California bankruptcy judge Thursday approved the International Longshore and Warehouse Union's request to dismiss its own bankruptcy after okaying the union's settlement of a long-running legal dispute with a shipping company that had driven it into insolvency

  • February 22, 2024

    American Airlines Can't Ground 401(k) Suit Over ESG Funds

    A Texas federal judge has refused to toss a pilot's proposed class action accusing American Airlines of packing its $26 billion retirement plan with investments that focused too heavily on environmental, social and governance factors, like climate change, and too little on financial returns.

  • February 22, 2024

    The Hollywood Writers' Strike Meant Long Hours For This GC

    When the Hollywood writers' strike ended in September, there was a 24-hour period of euphoria before Writers Guild staff and members turned their attention elsewhere. Ann Burdick, general counsel of the Writers Guild of America East, recently spoke with Law360 Pulse about her roles and responsibilities during and after the monthslong strike that halted production last year.

  • February 22, 2024

    Wage Rules Don't Apply To Ursinus Bonds, Pa. Justices Say

    Bonds arranged by a government-created authority for the expansion of a private Pennsylvania college did not become "public funds" through the government's involvement — or subject the project to prevailing wage rules for publicly funded construction, the Keystone State's highest court ruled Wednesday.

  • February 22, 2024

    NY Judge Halts State Ag Law's Anti-Union Speech Restriction

    A New York federal judge paused enforcement of a section of a state agricultural labor law that would make it an unfair labor practice to discourage unionization, saying claims from a farming group that the provision violates the First Amendment have a chance of success.

  • February 22, 2024

    Apartment Management Co. Illegally Fired Worker, NLRB Finds

    The company that manages a Phoenix apartment complex violated federal labor law when it ordered a new employee to stop telling his co-workers about his wages and then fired him after three days on the job, the National Labor Relations Board ruled, upholding an agency judge's decision.

  • February 21, 2024

    NLRB Says Home Depot Unlawfully Restricted BLM Protest

    Home Depot violated federal law by telling a worker they could not wear a Black Lives Matter slogan on their apron and directing them to remove it, the National Labor Relations Board ruled Wednesday, saying the message was connected to earlier group complaints about racism in the workplace.

  • February 21, 2024

    Employers Settling In One Year After NLRB Severance Ruling

    In the year since the National Labor Relations Board held that employers violate federal labor law by offering severance agreements that restrict employees' ability to talk about the employer or the pact itself, experts say parties have generally found compromises on language that complies with the ruling, but some questions remain unanswered.

  • February 21, 2024

    3rd Circ. Finds Art Supply Co. Illegally Fired Temp. Worker

    The Third Circuit backed a National Labor Relations Board decision that found an art supply company illegally let go of a Black temporary worker who raised complaints about racism in the workplace, saying Wednesday there was enough evidence to uphold the board's conclusions.

  • February 21, 2024

    Starbucks Pushes 4-Part NLRB Injunction Test At High Court

    Federal courts nationwide should require the National Labor Relations Board to satisfy four criteria to win injunctions in labor disputes, Starbucks told the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday, saying that applying certain jurisdictions' more lenient criteria grants the NLRB a "blank check" for obtaining injunctions.

  • February 21, 2024

    Judge Floats Sanctions For Union's 'Bad Faith' Recusal Bid

    A Michigan federal judge won't recuse himself from a defamation case involving two unions after a claim was raised that he expressed bias against the East Coast, instead asking the defendants why sanctions shouldn't be imposed for "bad faith" litigating.

  • February 21, 2024

    Tenn. Sysco Drivers To Vote On Teamsters Representation

    A National Labor Relations Board official greenlit a union representation election at a Sysco food distribution facility in Tennessee, clearing about 84 employees to vote on Teamsters affiliation after rejecting the employer's argument that the proposed bargaining unit should be broader.

  • February 21, 2024

    Bradley Arant Adds Ex-Baker Botts Labor, Employment Leader

    Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP is deepening its bench in the Lone Star State with the addition of its latest partner in Dallas, the former chair of Baker Botts' labor and employment practice.

  • February 20, 2024

    Liberal Justices Hint Chevron Deference Hanging By A Thread

    In the U.S. Supreme Court's latest battle royal over administrative powers, left-leaning justices at oral arguments Tuesday openly suggested that the landmark legal doctrine underpinning modern rulemaking might soon shrivel up, clearing the way for industry-led challenges to regulations on the books for decades.

  • February 20, 2024

    Amentum Can Claim Some COVID Leave Costs From Air Force

    The Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals has ruled that Amentum Services can partially claim increased costs under an Air Force contract based on California's COVID-19 sick leave laws but that sovereign immunity bars claims based on a military quarantine requirement.

  • February 20, 2024

    Chicago Rail Co. Tells Court To Prevent Potential Strike

    The Belt Railway Co. of Chicago urged an Illinois federal judge Tuesday to stop a union from going on strike over operations changes, saying the parties' disagreement must first be arbitrated under federal labor law.

  • February 20, 2024

    Starbucks Union Seeks 21 Elections In Drive's Busiest Day

    Starbucks Workers United filed petitions for representation elections at 21 stores in 14 states Tuesday in the campaign's busiest filing day since its summer 2021 launch, the union announced.

  • February 20, 2024

    Pac Bell Illegally Delayed Union Info Bids, NLRB Judge Says

    Pacific Bell Telephone Co. violated federal labor law by delaying responses to information requests from a Communications Workers of America affiliate, a National Labor Relations Board judge found, knocking the AT&T affiliate's contention that the company responded in a reasonable time frame.

  • February 20, 2024

    Wagner Law Adds Atty With Union-Side Background In LA

    Benefits boutique Wagner Law Group added a partner with two decades of experience advocating for unions and workers to its ranks in Los Angeles, bringing on a veteran who said he'll still be "sticking up for employees" even though he'll no longer be representing labor.

  • February 20, 2024

    SEIU Local Beats Cleaner's Race Bias Suit At 2nd Circ.

    The Second Circuit declined Tuesday to revive a race bias suit from a Hispanic office cleaner who said her union unlawfully failed to press a grievance about her workload, saying the worker hadn't shown that prejudice influenced the union's decision making.

  • February 20, 2024

    Benefits Threats Spell New Union Vote At USC Clinic

    About three dozen workers at a University of Southern California health clinic will vote again on whether to join unionized colleagues after a National Labor Relations Board judge found their bosses threatened to cut benefits and cap wages on the eve of their vote.

  • February 20, 2024

    5th Circ. Pauses Transfer Order In SpaceX, NLRB Dispute

    The Fifth Circuit pressed pause on a Texas district court's order to transfer SpaceX's suit over the constitutionality of the NLRB's structure to California, staying the lower court's decision while the appeals court considers the company's petition for writ of mandamus.

  • February 20, 2024

    High Court Won't Wade Into CSX Medical Leave Fight

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday rejected former CSX Transportation employees' push for review of a Fourth Circuit ruling that ended their suit claiming they were unlawfully fired for requesting medical leave.

Expert Analysis

  • Employer Lessons After 2023's Successful Labor Strikes

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    Following recent historic strikes in the automotive, entertainment and health care industries, employers of all types can learn key insights about how unions may approach negotiations and strikes going forward, and nonunionized workplaces should anticipate a drive for increased union membership, say Lenny Feigel and Mark Neuberger at Foley & Lardner.

  • Employer Takeaways From 2nd Circ. Equal Pay Ruling

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    The Second Circuit 's recent decision in Eisenhauer v. Culinary Institute of America reversed a long-held understanding of the Equal Pay Act, ultimately making it easier for employers to defend against equal pay claims brought under federal law, but it is not a clear escape hatch for employers, say Thelma Akpan and Katelyn McCombs at Littler.

  • Employers Should Review Training Repayment Tactics

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    State and federal examination of employee training repayment agreements has intensified, and with the potential for this tool to soon be severely limited, employers should review their options, including pivoting to other retention strategies, says Aaron Vance at Barnes & Thornburg.

  • Extra NLRB Risks To Consider From Joint Employer Rule Edit

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    The National Labor Relations Board’s return to a broad definition of “joint employer” will expose companies — even those with only theoretical control of their outside consultants, contractors or franchise workers — to increased labor obligations and risks, further escalating their already expanding National Labor Relations Act liabilities, says William Kishman at Squire Patton.

  • AI At Work: Safety And NLRA Best Practices For Employers

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    There are many possible legal ramifications associated with integrating artificial intelligence tools and solutions into workplaces, including unionized workplaces' employer obligations under the National Labor Relations Act, and health and safety issues concerning robots and AI, say attorneys at Proskauer.

  • How Employers Can Navigate NLRB's Pro-Employee Shift

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    The National Labor Relations Board's recent decisions and general counsel memos mark the strong beginning of a trend toward greater pro-employee protections, so employers should proactively engage in risk management by revisiting their handbook policies accordingly, say attorneys at Foley & Lardner.

  • Justices' Coming Fisheries Ruling May Foster NLRA Certainty

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    If the U.S. Supreme Court’s forthcoming decision in the Loper Bright v. Raimondi commercial fisheries' case overrules judicial deference to federal agencies' legal interpretations, it could carry over to the National Labor Relations Board's vacillating interpretations of the National Labor Relations Act, bringing a measure of predictability to the board’s administration of the law, says Corey Franklin at FordHarrison.

  • Aviation Watch: When Are Pilots Too Old To Fly?

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    A recent move by the U.S. House of Representatives to raise the mandatory retirement age for airline pilots from 65 to 67 has reignited a decades-long debate — but this issue is best addressed through collective bargaining between carriers and pilots, rather than through legislation, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • 2 NLRB Rulings On Unilateral Changes Are Bad News For Cos.

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    The National Labor Relations Board's recent rulings in Wendt and Tecnocap on unilateral changes to employment terms shift bargaining leverage away from companies, but certain considerations can help employers navigate a contractual hiatus and negotiations for a first union contract, says Henry Morris Jr. at ArentFox Schiff.

  • NY Co-Ops Must Avoid Pitfalls When Navigating Insurance

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    In light of skyrocketing premiums, tricky exclusions and dwindling options, New York cooperative corporations must carefully review potential contractors' insurance policies in order to secure full protection, as even seemingly minor contractor jobs can carry significant risk due to New York labor laws, says Eliot Zuckerman at Smith Gambrell.

  • What Employers Face As NLRB Protects More Solo Protests

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    Given the National Labor Relations Board’s recent decision in Miller Plastics to implement a broader standard for when it will protect individual protests, employers must be careful to not open themselves to unfair labor practice claims when disciplining employees with personal gripes, says Mohamed Barry at Fisher Phillips.

  • USW Ruling Highlights Successor Liability In Bankruptcy Sale

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    A Delaware federal court's recent decision in United Steelworkers v. Braeburn is important for potential asset purchasers in Section 363 bankruptcy sales as it found the purchaser was subject to obligations under the National Labor Relations Act notwithstanding language in the sale approval order transferring the debtor's assets free and clear of successor liability, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Starbucks 'Memphis 7' Ruling Shows Retaliation Is A Bad Idea

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    Starbucks’ unsuccessful attempts to quash unionization by retaliating against organizing employees — illustrated by the Sixth Circuit's recent backing of an order that forced the company to rehire seven pro-union workers in Memphis, Tennessee — demonstrates why employers should eschew hard-line tactics and instead foster genuine dialogue with their workforce, says Janette Levey at Levey Law.

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