More Employment Coverage

  • January 30, 2024

    Texas AG Paxton Gets Pause On Depos In Whistleblower Suit

    The Texas Supreme Court on Tuesday paused a trial court's order directing Attorney General Ken Paxton to sit for depositions in a retaliation suit brought by former senior staffers, granting an emergency motion filed by Paxton just days after a state appeals court refused to step in.

  • January 30, 2024

    8th Circ. Revives Wrongful Death Claim Against Paper Co.

    Paper company Sappi NA must face a lawsuit alleging that a worker was found deceased near an area where hydrogen sulfide gas was released despite the trustee for the worker's family collecting workers' compensation from a subsidiary, an Eighth Circuit panel ruled Tuesday, finding that the parent firm would need employees working at the facility when the death occurred for the state Workers' Compensation Act to bar the trustee's claims against it.

  • January 30, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Says VA Court Must Rehear Vet's Benefits Bid

    The federal government must reopen a veteran's application for U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs-provided employment benefits, the Federal Circuit ruled Tuesday, finding that a VA court incorrectly declined to add new documents that would potentially bolster the case for benefits.

  • January 30, 2024

    7th Circ. Won't Revive School Staffers' COVID-Testing Suit

    The Seventh Circuit on Monday refused to reinstate a lawsuit brought by public school personnel challenging the Illinois governor's orders that they be tested regularly for COVID-19 unless they had been vaccinated, saying the plaintiffs improperly filed one suit in state court seeking declaratory and injunctive relief and a second in federal court seeking damages.

  • January 30, 2024

    Fennemore Craig Growing In Calif. With Sullivan Hill Merger

    In its latest West Coast expansion, Fennemore Craig PC announced Tuesday it is widening its footprint in San Diego through a merger with Sullivan Hill, with the latter's experts in insurance, construction, commercial bankruptcy and employment law joining Fennemore's existing four-attorney team in the city.

  • January 30, 2024

    Prison For Apple IP Thief Would Warn Silicon Valley, Feds Say

    California federal prosecutors asked a judge for a one-year prison sentence for a former Apple engineer who pled guilty to stealing trade secrets from the company while working on its self-driving car, arguing there's a need to deter other Silicon Valley employees from doing the same.

  • January 30, 2024

    Mich. Judge OKs $20M For Victims Of Faulty Fraud Algorithm

    A Michigan state judge signed off Monday on a settlement that will see the state's unemployment agency pay $20 million to people wrongly accused of fraud by an algorithm.

  • January 29, 2024

    Judge Says Notice And Comment Rule Was Met For H-2A Revision

    A D.C. federal judge on Monday rejected an agriculture industry group's contention that the Biden administration skipped notice and comments before promulgating a 2022 rule that amended H-2A regulations, saying the public had been on notice about the rule since 2019.

  • January 29, 2024

    CoreLogic Gets Ex-Worker's 401(k) Mismanagement Suit Axed

    A California federal judge tossed a former CoreLogic worker's suit claiming the company burdened its retirement plan with excessive fees and underperforming funds, ruling that the employee didn't personally face the financial harm that he complained about in the suit.

  • January 29, 2024

    Del. Justices Reverse Toss Of Cantor Fitzgerald No-Compete

    In a ruling affirming Delaware's corporate law deference to valid partnership contracts, the state's Supreme Court on Monday reversed a Chancery Court decision that last year invalidated "forfeiture for competition" terms in Cantor Fitzgerald LP's limited partnership agreements, unwinding a win worth $12.5 million.

  • January 29, 2024

    Chicago Beats Remaining Vaccine Mandate Challenges

    An Illinois federal judge on Friday threw out a lawsuit brought by Chicago employees challenging the city's COVID-19 vaccine mandate, finding the workers couldn't point to case law showing being denied an exemption was a burden on their religious practice.

  • January 29, 2024

    3 Ex-DHS Staffers Get Prison, Probation For Software Theft

    Three former U.S. Department of Homeland Security employees have been sentenced to prison or probation for their alleged roles in conspiring to steal proprietary software and sensitive law-enforcement databases from the government in a scheme to develop a commercial product for sale.

  • January 29, 2024

    Depos Not Needed In Retaliation Suit, AG Tells Texas Justices

    Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton called on the state Supreme Court Monday to erase a trial court order directing him and top aides to sit for depositions in a long-running whistleblower suit, saying that discovery should not occur because his office has opted not to contest the allegations brought by former employees.

  • January 26, 2024

    'Real Housewives' Star Claims Show Used Assault For Profit

    Former "The Real Housewives of New Jersey" cast member Caroline Manzo sued Bravo Media LLC on Friday in New York state court, alleging her co-star Brandi Glanville sexually assaulted her and that the network "chose ratings and profits over protecting their employees."

  • January 26, 2024

    Ex-Child Care Worker's 'Hypothetical' Competition Claims Fail

    A Washington federal judge said she couldn't hear claims in a case accusing a child care company of hindering a former worker from landing outside nannying jobs, saying the plaintiff failed to point to any lost opportunities because of the employer's policies.

  • January 26, 2024

    Consulting Company Says Rival Poached Houston Workers

    Consulting firm Socotec Advisory LLC says its rival raided its roster of legal industry consultants and expert witnesses, telling a Texas state court Thursday that its former workers orchestrated an exodus from the company with competitor Secretariat Advisors LLC and took trade secrets with them.

  • January 26, 2024

    NC Insurance Group Not Bound By Medicare Law, Suit Says

    The North Carolina Insurance Guaranty Association asked a federal court to find that it doesn't have to pay back Medicare for claims that should otherwise be covered by private insurance, arguing the agency isn't a policy provider as defined by federal law.

  • January 26, 2024

    NJ Health Network Accused Of Poaching Docs Amid JV Talks

    A major Garden State healthcare provider "decimated" a private orthopedic surgery practice when it abruptly scuttled talks on a potential joint venture and poached 10 physicians, a suit filed in New Jersey state court claims.

  • January 26, 2024

    Engineering Co. Flouted Stock Buyback Deal, Ex-Execs Say

    A former associate vice president and a managing director at engineering firm Syska Hennessy alleged in North Carolina federal court that the company violated an agreement by not purchasing their employee stock after they departed.

  • January 26, 2024

    Paxton Again Appeals Deposition Order In Whistleblower Suit

    Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has urged a state appellate court for a second time to review a lower court order requiring him to sit for a deposition in a long-running retaliation lawsuit brought by four former senior staffers, arguing there are no longer disputed issues of fact that call for such discovery.

  • January 26, 2024

    DeSantis Seeks 11th Circ. Rethink In Ousted Prosecutor Fight

    Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis wants an en banc panel of the Eleventh Circuit to rehear a recent decision to revive ousted state prosecutor Andrew Warren's bid for reinstatement, arguing the three-judge panel's ruling transformed "the First Amendment from a shield against government oppression into a sword against a governor's disciplinary decisions."

  • January 26, 2024

    Ex-Allied World Exec Denies Feds' $1.5M Fraud Charges

    A former vice president at Allied World National Insurance Co. who was recently ordered to pay $2.9 million to the company in its civil case accusing him of embezzlement has pled not guilty to federal prosecutors' 10 wire fraud charges against him in his parallel criminal proceedings.

  • January 26, 2024

    FIFA Upholds Luis Rubiales' 3-Year Ban Over World Cup Kiss

    A FIFA panel upheld the organization's suspension of former Spanish soccer president Luis Rubiales on Friday, leaving Rubiales barred from the sport for three years for kissing national team midfielder Jenni Hermoso after the team's World Cup victory last year.

  • January 25, 2024

    Dems Press DHS Watchdog For Info On Retaliation Settlement

    Top-ranking Democrats renewed their calls on Thursday for U.S. Department of Homeland Security Inspector General Joseph Cuffari to cooperate in an investigation against him into whether he inappropriately spent $1.2 million in taxpayer money to end allegations of whistleblower retaliation.

  • January 25, 2024

    Mining Co. Not Covered For Wrongful Death Suit

    A mining company does not have coverage from its general liability or workers' compensation insurers for an underlying wrongful death suit, a Pennsylvania court ruled, finding that an exclusion applied for one policy and the underlying claims weren't within the scope of the other.

Expert Analysis

  • Hoopers In NCAA Suit Respark Eligibility Framework Debate

    Author Photo

    A decision by two brothers involved in a recent antitrust lawsuit against the NCAA — to play college basketball rather than go professional after graduating from the Overtime Elite league — has aimed the spotlight on what exactly the NCAA deems permissible compensation under its current framework, say Brady Foster and Dan Lust at Moritt Hock.

  • Practical Insights For Employers Using AI

    Author Photo

    Keeping up with the relentless pace and evolution of regulatory and legislative artificial intelligence in 2023 has been a challenge for employers, but there are four takeaways employers using AI in the workplace should consider by looking toward developments like the European Union's AI Act and President Joe Biden's AI executive order, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • Lessons From DOJ's Wave Of Labor Market Prosecutions

    Author Photo

    Attorneys at Patterson Belknap consider lessons learned and future meaningful challenges following the U.S. Department of Justice's first six criminal antitrust cases targeting employee no-poach and wage-fixing agreements, in which just one case resulted in a guilty plea.

  • 5 Steps For Healthcare Companies After Biden's AI Order

    Author Photo

    Rather than simply monitoring for the issuance of agency guidelines on artificial intelligence in the wake of President Joe Biden's October executive order, health and life sciences companies should take action now and begin building internal operational and technical infrastructures designed to govern the use of AI, says Joy Sharp at Faegre Drinker.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • How AI Executive Order Aims To Compete For Foreign Talent

    Author Photo

    Immigration provisions within the Biden administration's executive order on artificial intelligence take a strategic approach to promoting the U.S. as a destination for AI and STEM talent by streamlining visa processing, enhancing educational and exchange programs, and improving current visa programs and pathways to permanent residency, says Eric Bord at Morgan Lewis.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • How New Expert Rules Are Already Changing Court Decisions

    Author Photo

    Though not formally effective until last week, some courts have been relying for several years on amended federal rules clarifying judges’ gatekeeping role, so counsel should be prepared to justify their expert witnesses’ methodologies and expect additional motion practice on expert testimony admissibility, say Colleen Kenney and Daniel Kelly at Sidley.

  • Legal Lessons From Past World Cups To Keep In Mind For '26

    Author Photo

    The 2022 World Cup in Qatar and the 2023 Women's World Cup in Australia and New Zealand set new standards for sustainability, human rights and sponsorship — and with those new standards come new challenges for those involved in the planning of the 2026 World Cup in North America, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • 2nd Circ. Defamation Ruling May Chill NY Title IX Reports

    Author Photo

    The Second Circuit’s recent decision, holding accusers in Connecticut Title IX sexual misconduct cases are not immune to defamation claims, means that New York higher education institutions should reassess whether their disciplinary hearing procedures both protect due process and encourage victim and witness participation, says Nicole Donatich at Cullen and Dykman.

  • Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

    Author Photo

    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

    Author Photo

    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Employment Authority Other archive.