More Employment Coverage

  • January 25, 2024

    Progressive Says Uber Crash Coverage Limited To $50K

    Coverage for Uber and one of its drivers involved in an underlying automobile accident is limited to $50,000, Progressive told a Florida federal court Thursday, stating that a second policy with a $1 million bodily injury limit isn't applicable because the accident didn't occur during a prearranged service.

  • January 25, 2024

    Cook County Can't Duck 300 Officers' Harassment Claims

    An Illinois federal judge on Wednesday refused to dismiss claims filed by most correctional officers alleging in three lawsuits that Cook County and its sheriff's office failed to address pervasive and relentless sexual harassment by county jail detainees, dismissing only three individual plaintiffs from one of the suits.

  • January 25, 2024

    Ex-Spanish Soccer Head May Face Trial In Kiss Controversy

    Spain's highest court on Thursday recommended that Luis Rubiales, former president of the country's governing body for soccer, stand trial for a nonconsensual kiss he planted on the lips of a player during the ceremony celebrating the women's soccer team's World Cup win.

  • January 25, 2024

    Ex-Director Says Off-Label Marketing Objections Cost Him Job

    The former director of government sales for a major pharmaceutical company alleged in a retaliation lawsuit that he was fired for voicing concerns about the business illegally selling a drug to federal health care providers by marketing it for uses that aren't approved by regulators.

  • January 25, 2024

    Service Snag Delays Hospital Operator's Ch. 11 Confirmation

    California-based hospital operator Alecto Healthcare Services LLC will wait until March to seek confirmation of its proposed Chapter 11 plan as a small-business debtor, after attorneys told a Delaware bankruptcy judge Thursday it hadn't served notice of the proposal to roughly 700 creditors. 

  • January 25, 2024

    John Hancock Clients Owed Tax Credit Perk, 11th Circ. Told

    John Hancock Life Insurance Co. clients urged an Eleventh Circuit panel on Thursday to reverse a lower court's ruling that the company didn't breach a fiduciary duty when $100 million worth of foreign tax credits wasn't passed through to them, saying the transaction diminished the value of their retirement accounts.

  • January 25, 2024

    AG Paxton Hits Back At Reassignment Of Whistleblower Suit

    Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has said that Travis County is an unfair venue for an employment retaliation suit brought by four of his former senior aides, calling the fate of his office "predetermined by the court's political leanings" following the reassignment of the lawsuit to a different judge.

  • January 25, 2024

    Detroit Counsel Criticizes City Law Dept. In Biting Resignation

    Detroit's deputy corporation counsel said he was stepping down amid concerns the city's top lawyer was mismanaging the department, drawing attention to a state judge's recent dressing-down of the city for violating a court order.

  • January 25, 2024

    'Yelp For Judges' Ramps Up Effort To End Clerks' Harassment

    A relatively new nonprofit, started by a former judicial clerk, is stepping up its work to bring transparency to the clerkship experience and address harassment and discrimination against clerks.

  • January 24, 2024

    Aerospace Contractor Inks $7.4M Deal In Conn. No-Poach Suit

    An aerospace subcontractor accused alongside Raytheon Technologies Corp.'s Pratt & Whitney division and others of conspiring to restrict hiring will pay $7.4 million to resolve the antitrust claims, according to a notice filed Wednesday in Connecticut federal court that indicates three other deals are also on the horizon.

  • January 24, 2024

    Benesch Taps Partners From Kirkland & Ellis, Sheppard Mullin

    Benesch Friedlander Coplan & Aronoff LLP has added both a prominent Kirkland & Ellis LLP private equity partner, who will help spearhead its private equity group, as well as an accomplished commercial litigator from Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP, according to announcements made by the firm.

  • January 24, 2024

    Bid To Swap Chevron For An Old Standby Raises Doubts

    Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court debated whether a World War II-era doctrine encouraging courts to strongly consider agency statutory interpretations could replace the court's controversial so-called Chevron doctrine that requires judges to defer to those interpretations if a statute is ambiguous.

  • January 24, 2024

    Ex-Adviser Agrees To Stop Stealing JPMorgan Clients

    A Michigan federal judge approved a stipulated injunction against a former JPMorgan wealth adviser who agreed not to solicit any clients from the company, after it accused him of stealing clients worth $40 million and "bad-mouthing" the firm since leaving in November.

  • January 24, 2024

    CRE Firm Can't Escape Slander Claim In Stolen Investor Suit

    A New Jersey federal judge found First National Property Management LLC must face counterclaims from two former employees that the firm defamed them after executives told investors in the pair's enterprise that they were breaking the law by copying its business model.

  • January 24, 2024

    AG Paxton Aims To Block Depositions In Whistleblower Case

    Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton told a state court he and his top aides shouldn't have to sit for depositions in a whistleblower suit after not contesting the allegations, saying the former employees behind the case "continue to pretend they must litigate undisputed issues."

  • January 24, 2024

    Ogletree's New LA Leader On The Allure Of Employment Law

    For Jack Sholkoff, the new leader of Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC's Los Angeles office, it's the "real issues" and "real people" that has drawn him to employment law.

  • January 24, 2024

    Cannabist Co. Says Suit Over $25M Deal Came Too Late

    Cannabist Company Holdings Inc. said this week an associate's lawsuit in New York federal court claiming he was never paid for his work expanding the company into Florida and securing one of the state's few medical marijuana licenses was filed too late, dooming all of his claims.

  • January 23, 2024

    DC Judge Won't Ax Red Cross Workers' ERISA Suit Yet

    A D.C. federal judge on Tuesday declined to toss a lawsuit claiming the American National Red Cross violated federal benefits law by offering its workers an underperforming retirement plan with excessive fees, ordering each side to conduct "narrow, constrained and efficient discovery" before returning to the dismissal bid.

  • January 23, 2024

    Former Execs Must Scale Back Biz Amid Trade Secrets Suit

    The North Carolina Business Court has curbed the business activities of two former presidents of a property restoration company after finding their former employer had given a good case for proprietary information theft and violations of a noncompete agreement.

  • January 23, 2024

    NCAA Seeks Pause Of Colo. Suit Amid Consolidation Review

    The NCAA and various conferences have asked a Colorado federal judge to pause a proposed class action filed by a group of athletes hoping to share in the profits of televised sports matches, while a multidistrict litigation panel mulls a motion to transfer the case.

  • January 23, 2024

    Retired Jones Day Litigator Joins FisherBroyles In Chicago

    Weeks after announcing his retirement from Jones Day, longtime trial attorney William Dolan joined virtual law firm FisherBroyles LLP as a Chicago-based partner, according to a firm announcement.

  • January 23, 2024

    Immigration Judges Ask 4th Circ. To Revive Free Speech Suit

    The National Association of Immigration Judges is asking the Fourth Circuit to revive its suit challenging a policy it claims prevents judges from publicly discussing their personal views on immigration, arguing that a federal statute doesn't prevent a Virginia federal court from hearing its case.

  • January 23, 2024

    Tax Atty With Big 4 Experience Rejoins Eckert Seamans In Pa.

    An attorney who has specialized in tax matters her entire career has returned to Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott LLC in Pennsylvania, nearly four years after she left the firm for PricewaterhouseCoopers, the law firm announced Tuesday.

  • January 23, 2024

    Mich. Justices Won't Hear Hospital Stroke Treatment Suit

    The Michigan Supreme Court has declined to grant a hearing in an appeal challenging the dismissal of vicarious liability claims against a hospital over a patient whose stroke was allegedly not treated fast enough.

  • January 22, 2024

    Ex-Abercrombie CEO Says Feds Probing Sex Abuse Claims

    U.S. authorities are ramping up an investigation into accusations that Abercrombie & Fitch Co.'s ex-CEO Mike S. Jeffries trafficked male models for sex, with federal prosecutors impaneling a grand jury in New York as they seek any evidence of a sex trafficking ring, according to New York court filings Monday.

Expert Analysis

  • How Color Psychology Can Help Tell Your Trial Narrative

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    Research shows that color is a powerful sensory input that affects memory and perception, so attorneys should understand how, when and why to use certain shades in trial graphics to enhance their narrative and draw jurors’ focus, says Adam Bloomberg at IMS Consulting.

  • A Look At Mass. Sports Betting Data Privacy Regulations

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    The Massachusetts Gaming Commission recently approved data privacy regulations under the state's sports wagering act to promote responsible gaming, showing a trend of regulators directing companies on how to protect personal information used by artificial intelligence systems, say Liisa Thomas and Kathryn Smith at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Title IX Grievance Rules Raise Due Process Questions

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    The U.S. Department of Education’s proposed Title IX regulations for campus disciplinary proceedings would ease the administrative burden on institutions, but raise fairness and due process questions that will likely lead to follow-on litigation, say Markus Funk and Christopher Wilkinson at Perkins Coie.

  • Understanding Discovery Obligations In Era Of Generative AI

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    Attorneys and businesses must adapt to the unique discovery challenges presented by generative artificial intelligence, such as chatbot content and prompts, while upholding the principles of fairness, transparency and compliance with legal obligations in federal civil litigation, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Why Criminal No-Poach Cases Can Be Deceptively Complex

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    Mark Rosman at Wilson Sonsini discusses the reasons many criminal no-poach cases that appear simple are actually more complicated than they seem, following several jury trial acquittals and two dismissed cases.

  • The Case For Post-Bar Clerk Training Programs At Law Firms

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    In today's competitive legal hiring market, an intentionally designed training program for law school graduates awaiting bar admission can be an effective way of creating a pipeline of qualified candidates, says Brent Daub at Gilson Daub.

  • SEC Whistleblower Action Spotlights Risks For Private Cos.

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s recent whistleblower action against Monolith Resources holds important implications for private companies, who could face unprecedented regulatory scrutiny amid the agency's efforts to beef up environmental, social and governance reporting and enforcement, say attorneys at Wiley.

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

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    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

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    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Preparing Law Students For A New, AI-Assisted Legal World

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    As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the legal landscape, law schools must integrate technology and curricula that address AI’s innate challenges — from ethics to data security — to help students stay ahead of the curve, say Daniel Garrie at Law & Forensics, Ryan Abbott at JAMS and Karen Silverman at Cantellus Group.

  • ESG Around The World: South Korea

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    Numerous ESG trends have materialized in South Korea in the past three years, with impacts ranging from greenwashing prevention and carbon neutrality measures to workplace harassment and board diversity initiatives, say Chang Wook Min and Hyun Chan Jung at Jipyong.

  • How Social Media Can Affect Trial Outcomes

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    With social media’s ability to seize upon an issue and spin it into a specifically designed narrative, it is more critical than ever that a litigation communications strategy be part of trial planning to manage the impact of legal action on a company's reputation, say Sean Murphy and Steve Wood at Courtroom Sciences.

  • General Counsel Need Data Literacy To Keep Up With AI

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    With the rise of accessible and powerful generative artificial intelligence solutions, it is imperative for general counsel to understand the use and application of data for myriad important activities, from evaluating the e-discovery process to monitoring compliance analytics and more, says Colin Levy at Malbek.

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