More Employment Coverage

  • January 18, 2024

    Sharp Divisions Forecast Steep Climb For Sports NIL Overhaul

    Athletes, lawmakers and NCAA leadership clashed over the proper way to legislate name, image and likeness deals in college sports on Capitol Hill on Thursday, muddying the path forward for a bill that would override a patchwork of state laws with a sweeping federal model.

  • January 18, 2024

    Cohen Seglias Adds 5 Attys From Closing Nauman Smith

    Cohen Seglias Pallas Greenhall & Furman PC will expand its Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, office next month with the addition of five attorneys joining the firm following the closure of Nauman Smith.

  • January 17, 2024

    'Chaos' Warning Resonates As Justices Mull Chevron's Fate

    A conservative-led campaign against the 40-year-old doctrine of judicial deference to federal regulators appeared vulnerable at U.S. Supreme Court arguments Wednesday to predictions of a litigation tsunami, as justices fretted about an onslaught of suits and politicization of the federal judiciary.

  • January 17, 2024

    Thomas Gets Laugh, Agrees Prior Ruling Is 'Embarrassment'

    The specter of a major 2005 telecommunications ruling hung over U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas on Wednesday as he and his colleagues considered whether to toss the court's decades-old precedent instructing judges to defer to federal agencies' interpretations of ambiguous statutes. 

  • January 17, 2024

    5 Key Takeaways From Supreme Court's Chevron Arguments

    U.S. Supreme Court justices questioned Wednesday whether overturning a decades-old precedent instructing courts to defer to federal agencies' interpretations of ambiguous statutes would lead judges to legislate from the bench or diminish the value of Supreme Court precedent — and pondered whether they could "Kisorize" the doctrine rather than doing away with it altogether.

  • January 17, 2024

    2nd Circ. Sinks TransPerfect's Trade Secrets Appeal

    The Second Circuit on Wednesday refused to revive TransPerfect Global Inc.'s trade secrets suit against rival translation company Lionbridge Technologies Inc., saying there wasn't enough evidence to go to a jury.

  • January 17, 2024

    NJ Panel Reverses Zurich Win Over Auto Crash Coverage

    A New Jersey trial court wrongly dismissed a temporary staffing company's lawsuit seeking coverage from a Zurich unit for four employees' auto accident injury claims, a state appeals court ruled Wednesday, finding the summary judgment record was "bereft of undisputed facts."

  • January 17, 2024

    Gen Digital's $1.6M False Claims Act Loss Upped To $53M

    A D.C. federal judge on Tuesday partially granted a request by the federal government to amend a judgment in a whistleblower False Claims Act case against Gen Digital Inc. for its alleged overcharges, scrapping a $1.6 million damages award and replacing it with a $53 million judgment.

  • January 17, 2024

    Senators Say Labor Pacts' Forced Arbitration Aids Trafficking

    Lawmakers aim to hold human traffickers more accountable and give victims their day in court under a recently introduced bipartisan bill that would bar forced-arbitration clauses in employment contracts for trafficking claims.

  • January 17, 2024

    Racing Co. Worker Sues Over Tire Explosion Comp Pay

    An employee of a Connecticut racing team who was seriously injured in a tire explosion at a NASCAR track is claiming his employer threatened to fire him if he attempted to file for workers' compensation, according to a complaint filed in Connecticut state court.

  • January 17, 2024

    Health Co. Says Ex-CEO Sought 'Loyalty Oaths,' Revenge

    Summit Orthopedic Home Care has filed a federal suit in Ohio accusing its ex-CEO and his "cronies" of using oppressive behavior to gain control over operations and then using internal knowledge of Summit's relationships to benefit his new home healthcare business.

  • January 17, 2024

    Labor Officials Dodge Suit Over NC OSHA 'Incentive' Policy

    A North Carolina federal judge has thrown out a lawsuit accusing state labor officials of incentivizing inspectors to issue workplace safety citations, finding the corrosion control company that filed suit failed to show the citations it received resulted from such a policy.

  • January 17, 2024

    High Court Majority Shows No Eagerness To Overturn Chevron

    U.S. Supreme Court justices on Wednesday appeared split about whether decades-old precedent that favors federal agencies' legal interpretations in rulemaking infringes on judges' rightful authority to decide questions of law.

  • January 16, 2024

    6 Opinions To Read Before High Court's Chevron Arguments

    The U.S. Supreme Court will consider Wednesday whether to overturn a decades-old doctrine that instructs courts to defer to federal agencies' interpretations of ambiguous statutes, arguments in which nearly two dozen of the justices' prior writings may be used to persuade them to toss the controversial court precedent.

  • January 16, 2024

    Rakoff Details Why He Axed JPMorgan Investors' Epstein Suit

    A New York federal judge has published an opinion for his August order dismissing a pension fund's derivative suit against some of the top brass of JPMorgan Chase & Co. over their connections to Jeffrey Epstein, explaining in greater detail why he concluded that the plaintiffs had failed to make a pre-suit demand on the bank's board of directors.

  • January 16, 2024

    Insurance Adjuster Says Ex-Employees Stole Clients, Intel

    An insurance adjuster accused five ex-employees of colluding with a competitor to steal the company's clients, telling a Mississippi federal court that the employees breached their agreements with the company — including noncompetes — to benefit the competitor.

  • January 16, 2024

    Colo. Justices Say Firm's Departing Atty Fee Is Unenforceable

    The Colorado Supreme Court has found a family law firm's contract requiring a departing attorney to pay a fee for every client he took with him is unenforceable, ruling Tuesday in a unanimous decision that such a provision would improperly limit the attorney's practice and incentivize attorneys to drop clients with less lucrative claims.

  • January 16, 2024

    Panini Fearful Of Biz's Future If Fanatics Suit Is Tossed

    Trading card company Panini has asked a New York federal judge not to toss its antitrust lawsuit against rival Fanatics, Inc., arguing the suit's outcome could impact business for the next two decades.

  • January 16, 2024

    Conn. Judge Doubts Common Law Allows Wine Tasting Death Suit

    A Connecticut state court judge on Tuesday appeared skeptical of a lawsuit by the estate of a restaurant employee who died in a car crash after a "mandatory" wine tasting, questioning whether exceptions in workers' compensation and dram shop statutes made it impossible for common-law claims to move forward.

  • January 16, 2024

    Food Flavoring Co. Seeks Coverage For Worker Injury Suits

    A manufacturer of food and beverage ingredients told a Kentucky federal court that its primary and umbrella insurers must provide coverage for nearly two decades of lawsuits brought by workers who said they were injured by exposure to certain chemical compounds in flavoring products.

  • January 16, 2024

    Therapy Co. Says Ex-Directors 'Raided' Staff And Patients

    Two psychotherapists who resigned from their roles as directors of a Pennsylvania-based mental health practice have been hit with a suit alleging they "brazenly solicited and raided" workers from the practice to launch their own therapy business.

  • January 16, 2024

    Fla. Restaurateur Pleads Guilty In $3.8M Payroll Tax Fraud

    A Florida restaurateur has pled guilty to a count of failing to remit payroll taxes to the Internal Revenue Service after striking a deal with government attorneys and agreeing to pay back more than $3.8 million in restitution, the U.S. Department of Justice said on Tuesday.

  • January 16, 2024

    Ex-Nelson Levine Partner Settles Years-Old Breakup Dispute

    The eponymous Nelson of Nelson Levine de Luca & Hamilton LLC has agreed to drop a suit to compel arbitration amid allegations he was shorted amid the insurance law firm's 2014 breakup, entering a joint stipulation of dismissal alongside seven individual defendants about five years after a Pennsylvania federal judge first ordered that the complaint enter arbitration.

  • January 16, 2024

    BCLP Wants Mondelez Data Breach Suit Tossed

    Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP urged an Illinois federal judge on Monday to nix a putative class action accusing the firm of failing to safeguard the personal information of employees at its client Mondelez International Inc. following a data breach at the law firm.

  • January 16, 2024

    Blank Rome Keeps Arbitral Win In Ex-Dickstein Partners' Suit

    A California appellate panel agreed Tuesday that an arbitrator was within his authority to find that Blank Rome LLP doesn't owe former Dickstein Shapiro LLP partners $4 million in a dispute over the characterization of the firms' tie-up.

Expert Analysis

  • Knicks Suit Shows Need For Leagues To Protect Big Data

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    The New York Knicks' recent lawsuit alleging a former employee took trade secrets to the Toronto Raptors shows sports leagues — both professional and amateur — should prepare for future litigation in this realm, given the growth of analytics and statistics in front offices, says Kevin Paule at Hill Ward Henderson.

  • Issues That Can Arise When Tech Founders Leave CEO Role

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    More founders of venture-backed technology companies are transitioning out of the CEO role earlier than before, which can lead to unanticipated consequences if parties haven't carefully reviewed the company's certificate of incorporation, stockholders' agreements and the founder's employment agreement, say Alex Leibowitz and Megan Monson at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

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    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • What Whistleblowing Trends Mean For Securities Litigation

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    A recent survey on whistleblowing-related topics suggests several valuable lessons for companies to consider regarding securities and shareholder litigation, and underscores the need to implement and advertise robust whistleblowing policies to employees, say attorneys at Freshfields.

  • How Cos. Can Mitigate IP Risks After NY Labor Law Updates

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    A recent New York labor law amendment limits the permissible scope of invention assignment agreements, leading to potential intellectual property risks for New York-based employers, which they can reduce through several steps, including the reevaluation of assignment provisions in employment agreements, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • Get Ready For Calif.'s Expanded Restrictive Covenant Ban

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    California recently passed the second of two new laws that together largely prohibit restrictive covenants, even for certain out-of-state employers — and since there's not much time before the statutes become effective, now is the time for companies to revisit how their confidential information will be protected, says Russell Beck at Beck Reed.

  • Class Action Defense: Don't Give Up On Bristol-Myers Squibb

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    Federal appellate court decisions in the six years since the U.S. Supreme Court decided Bristol-Myers Squibb show that it's anyone's ballgame in class action jurisdictional arguments, so defendants are encouraged to consider carefully whether, where and when arguing lack of specific personal jurisdiction may be advantageous, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • Parsing Maryland's Earned Wage Access Products Guidance

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    The Maryland Office of Financial Regulation's new guidance on earned wage access products intended to provide clarity under the state's law may be confusing, but ultimately means one thing — you are either the employer's service provider helping offer an employee benefit, or you are not and therefore considered a lender, say attorneys at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

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    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

  • Rebuilding The Construction Industry With AI

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    Artificial intelligence in the construction industry will usher in a new era of innovation and efficiency, leading to cheaper, safer and more environmentally conscious building practices, but it will also bring concerns related to data security, workforce training and job displacement, say Josephine Bahn and Jeffery Mullen at Cozen O'Connor.

  • FTC, DOL Collab Marks New Labor Market Enforcement Era

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    The Federal Trade Commission and the U.S. Department of Labor’s recent agreement to share information and coordinate investigations, coupled with new premerger rules and merger guidelines, underscores the paradigm shift underway to use the full authority of administrative agencies for worker protection, say Jeetander Dulani and Bill Kearney at Stinson.

  • The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Espinosa On 'Lincoln Lawyer'

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    The murder trials in Netflix’s “The Lincoln Lawyer” illustrate the stark contrast between the ethical high ground that fosters and maintains the criminal justice system's integrity, and the ethical abyss that can undermine it, with an important reminder for all legal practitioners, say Judge Adam Espinosa and Andrew Howard at the Colorado 2nd Judicial District Court.

  • Teach Your Witness About 'Good' And 'Bad' Testimony Words

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    To ensure honest and accurate testimony in trials and depositions, attorneys must take care to educate their witnesses about the problematic words opposing counsel may use, such as “always” and “must,” and the effective words they can use in response, like “potentially” and “depends,” say Steve Wood and Bill Kanasky at Courtroom Sciences.

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