Wage & Hour

  • February 16, 2024

    $1.7M COVID Screening Suit Deal Gets Final OK

    A group of lab testing companies and California employees who say they were denied pay for COVID-19 screenings have ended their wage dispute, as a California federal judge granted final approval to a $1.7 million settlement.

  • February 16, 2024

    Sephora Says NY Ruling Conceals Suit Over Late Wages

    A recent New York appeals court's decision makes it clear workers can't lodge late payment claims against their employers, Sephora told a New York federal court, urging it to toss two workers' suit that the beauty chain didn't pay them on time.

  • February 16, 2024

    Workers Urge Judge To Nix Third-Party Suit In Wage Case

    A worker accusing a delivery service of misclassifying him as an independent contractor urged a California federal judge to toss the company's third-party complaint against his company, saying the delivery company wants to shift the blame and costs or scare the worker into axing his suit.

  • February 16, 2024

    NYC Salary Range Rules Take Shape Amid Recent Crackdown

    Among the series of complaints New York City fired off in the past six months accusing companies of flouting its salary transparency law are three cases that experts said shine a much-needed light on what the city's civil rights enforcement arm considers a reasonable wage range for a job ad.

  • February 16, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Coverall Wage Cases Head To 9th Circ. Args

    In the coming week, attorneys should watch for Ninth Circuit oral arguments in a pair of cases against janitorial franchising company Coverall North America Inc. Here's a look at those cases and other labor and employment matters coming up in California.

  • February 16, 2024

    Fired Hospital Worker Can't Keep Fighting PTO Denial

    A maintenance worker who lost an administrative case alleging his ex-employer owed him money for unused paid time off when he was fired cannot try again to get a judgment in state court against the hospital where he worked or Michigan labor regulators, an appellate panel has found.

  • February 16, 2024

    NY Forecast: 2nd Circ. Hears Xerox Healthcare Union Case

    In the coming week, the Second Circuit will consider a union's argument to overturn a lower court decision holding that a union could not arbitrate a grievance over Xerox's decision to end health benefits for retired workers. Here, Law360 explores this and another major labor and employment case on the docket in New York.

  • February 16, 2024

    Marty Walsh Talks Labor Sec. Legacy, Julie Su And Hockey

    A year after announcing his departure as U.S. labor secretary, Marty Walsh says his government experience has come in handy as he oversees the professional hockey players' union, including as they prepare to bargain for a new agreement, and that he's willing to keep pushing for the confirmation of his successor.

  • February 16, 2024

    NY AG Tells Firm To Stop Misleading Uber, Lyft Drivers

    New York Attorney General Letitia James' office put a New York City law firm on notice Friday, warning in a cease-and-desist letter that the firm must immediately stop proffering unnecessary legal services to "help" Uber and Lyft drivers secure funds, for a fee, stemming from a November New York Labor Law settlement.

  • February 16, 2024

    Model Snags Atty Fees In Late Pay Challenges At 9th Circ.

    A model is entitled to recover almost $43,000 in attorney fees for defending a vape maker's Ninth Circuit appeals of the worker's lower court win in her lawsuit alleging late payment for her work, a three-judge panel for the appeals court has ruled.

  • February 16, 2024

    Drivers' Case Before Justices May Fortify Arbitration Carveout

    A case set for oral arguments Tuesday before the U.S. Supreme Court could help transportation workers show they're exempt from federal arbitration law. Here, Law360 breaks down the dispute ahead of the hearing.

  • February 16, 2024

    Former Worker Says Supercuts Owner Cut OT Rate Too Short

    A former worker is accusing the owner of about 400 Supercuts, Cost Cutters and Holiday Hair salons in seven states of shortchanging its hourly employees on their compensation by not accounting for commissions and other non-discretionary bonuses in their overtime rate calculations.

  • February 16, 2024

    Delivery Co. Denied Early Appeal In Mass. Wage Dispute

    A delivery company did not meet the standard for an immediate appeal of a ruling in favor of a group of drivers alleging they were misclassified as independent contractors, a Massachusetts federal judge ruled in denying the company's motion to appeal to the First Circuit.

  • February 15, 2024

    Calif. Justices Won't Give Uber PAGA Case Another Look

    The California Supreme Court won't again mull an Uber driver's misclassification Private Attorneys General Act suit, denying the company's bid to weigh whether nonindividual claims under the state law should survive if individual ones go into arbitration.

  • February 15, 2024

    House Hearing Highlights Real Estate Contractor Question

    A recent U.S. House committee hearing put a spotlight on how a new U.S. Department of Labor independent contractor rule applies to real estate agents, reviving an ongoing debate weeks before the regulation is set to take effect. Here, Law360 explores the issue.

  • February 15, 2024

    Autolenders Wants Ex-Worker's OT Suit To Be Tossed

    Auto retailer Autolenders is asking a New Jersey federal judge to toss claims from a former worker that he was fired for complaining about not being paid for overtime, arguing that in an amended complaint, the ex-employee improperly attempted to distance himself from his initial claims that he worked as a salesman.

  • February 15, 2024

    Vaughan Baio Adds 3 Partners And 2 Offices In NY, NJ

    Philadelphia-based midsized firm Vaughan Baio & Partners expanded its footprint and resources this month with the addition of three partners and the opening of two offices in New York and New Jersey.

  • February 15, 2024

    Ex-Employer Blasts Lewis Brisbois Partner's Immunity Claim

    A Houston lawyer and his firm, Berg & Androphy, are urging a Texas state court to reject an attempt by a former employee and current partner with Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP to avoid $457,190 in potential sanctions for allegedly harassing Berg & Androphy with years of legal fights over back wages.

  • February 15, 2024

    Bradley Arant Hires Liskow & Lewis Employment Pro In Houston

    A longtime Liskow & Lewis attorney has jumped to Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP's labor and employment practice in Houston in an effort to further the firm's strategic growth in Texas.

  • February 15, 2024

    Uber Driver Asks Justices To Stay Out Of PAGA Case

    A California court didn't ignore and actually followed U.S. Supreme Court precedent when it ruled that representatives' claims brought under California's Private Attorneys General Act can remain in court if individuals go into arbitration, an Uber driver has told the justices.

  • February 15, 2024

    NY Bank Doesn't Pay For Opening Tasks, Ex-Worker Says

    A New York community bank doesn't pay workers for tasks involved in opening the bank at the beginning of the day, a former banker claimed in a proposed collective action in federal court, saying the bank's payroll system did not let workers enter time for those duties.

  • February 14, 2024

    Legal Org. Backs Lyft In Supreme Court PAGA Fight

    Representative and individual claims brought under California's Private Attorneys General Act are inseparable when it comes to arbitration, a legal organization told the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday, backing Lyft's challenge to a California state appellate court's decision preserving a former driver's representative claims.

  • February 14, 2024

    GOP Senator Wants Confirmation Hearing On Labor Secretary

    Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., called on the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions to hold another hearing on the nomination of Julie Su to the position of secretary of labor, arguing that Su's record as acting secretary deserves public scrutiny.

  • February 14, 2024

    NYC Servers Sue Korean BBQ Eateries Over Tipped Wages

    A proposed class of servers hit two Manhattan-based Korean barbecue restaurants with a wage-and-tipping suit Wednesday in New York federal court, claiming their former employers failed to adhere to "strict" tip credits governed by the state and the Fair Labor Standards Act.

  • February 14, 2024

    Nursing Home Co. Can't Escape Kansas CNAs' Wage Suit

    A Kansas federal judge declined to toss a proposed collective action accusing a nursing home company of failing to pay its nursing assistants all their wages owed, rejecting the company's argument that state wage law does not apply and saying the workers had staked a plausible claim.

Expert Analysis

  • The Growing Need For FLSA Private Settlement Rule Clarity

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    A Pennsylvania district court's recent ruling in Walker v. Marathon Petroleum echoes an interesting and growing trend of jurists questioning the need for — and legality of — judicial approval of private Fair Labor Standards Act settlements, which provides more options for parties to efficiently resolve their claims, says Rachael Coe at Moore & Van Allen.

  • High Court Bakery Driver Case Could Limit Worker Arbitration

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    Employers that require arbitration of worker claims under the Federal Arbitration Act should closely follow Bissonnette v. LePage Bakeries as it goes before the U.S. Supreme Court, which could thoroughly expand the definition of “transportation workers” who are exempt from compulsory arbitration and force companies to field more employee disputes in court, says Nick Morisani at Phelps Dunbar.

  • In Focus At The EEOC: Advancing Equal Pay

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    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s recently finalized strategic enforcement plan expresses a renewed commitment to advancing equal pay at a time when employees have unprecedented access to compensation information, highlighting for employers the importance of open communication and ongoing pay equity analyses, say Paul Evans at Baker McKenzie and Christine Hendrickson at Syndio.

  • Return Days Key In Hyatt COVID-19 Layoffs Ruling

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    The Ninth Circuit’s recent decision in Hartstein v. Hyatt, which clarified when the hotel giant had to pay out accrued vacation time after pandemic-prompted temporary layoffs, highlights the importance of whether an employer specifies a return date within the normal pay period, say attorneys at ArentFox Schiff.

  • How ESG Is Taking Women's Soccer To The Next Level

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    Several elite soccer teams sharpened their competitive edges for the 2023 Women's World Cup by focusing on environmental, social and governance issues at home, demonstrating that many industries can use the principles of ESG investing to identify opportunities to increase growth, improve performance and address stakeholders' desires, say attorneys at ArentFox Schiff.

  • How Int'l Strategies Can Mitigate US Child Labor Risks

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    Recent reports of child labor in the U.S. raise significant compliance concerns under state and federal child labor laws, but international business and human rights principles provide tools companies can use to identify, mitigate and remediate the risks, says Tom Plotkin at Covington.

  • 2nd Circ. OT Ruling Guides On Pay For Off-The-Clock Work

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    While the Second Circuit’s recent holding in Perry v. City of New York reiterated that the Fair Labor Standards Act obligates employers to pay overtime for off-the-clock work, it recognized circumstances, such as an employee’s failure to report, that allow an employer to disclaim the knowledge element that triggers this obligation, say Robert Whitman and Kyle Winnick at Seyfarth.

  • FLSA Ruling Highlights Time Compensability Under State Law

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    While the Third Circuit's August decision in Tyger v. Precision Drilling endorsed the prevailing standard among federal courts regarding time compensability under the Fair Labor Standards Act, it also serves as a reminder that state laws will often find a broader range of activities to be compensable, say Ryan Warden and Craig Long at White and Williams.

  • Understanding Wage Theft Penalties Under New NY Statute

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    Under a recently enacted New York statute, wage theft is considered a form of larceny under the state's penal law, and prosecutors can seek even stronger penalties against violators — so all employers are well advised to pay close and careful attention to compliance with their wage payment obligations, say Paxton Moore and Robert Whitman at Seyfarth.

  • How To Create A California-Compliant Piece-Rate Pay Policy

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    Piece-rate compensation can encourage worker efficiency and productivity, but California has special rules for employers that use this type of pay plan, so careful execution and clear communication with employees is essential for maintaining compliance, says Ashley Paynter at Riley Safer.

  • 3 Employer Considerations In Light Of DOL Proposed OT Rule

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    A recently unveiled rule from the U.S. Department of Labor would increase the salary threshold for Fair Labor Standards Act overtime exemptions, and while the planned changes are not the law just yet, employers should start thinking about the best ways to position their organizations for compliance in the future, say Brodie Erwin and Sarah Spangenburg at Kilpatrick.

  • Prevailing Wage Rules Complicate Inflation Act Tax Incentives

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    Nicole Elliott and Timothy Taylor at Holland & Knight discuss the intersection between tax and labor newly created by the Inflation Reduction Act, and focus on aspects of recent U.S. Department of Labor and U.S. Department of the Treasury rules that may catch tax-incentive seekers off guard.

  • Calif., Wash. Rest Break Waivers: What Carriers Must Know

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    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's recent invitation for petitions to waive its rules on meal and rest breaks for commercial drivers in California and Washington is an unusual move, and the agency's own guidance seems to acknowledge that its plan may face legal challenges, says Jessica Scott at Wheeler Trigg.