Employment UK

  • March 14, 2024

    Clara Takes Debenhams Pension Scheme In Landmark Deal

    All 10,400 members of the retirement savings plan of collapsed retailer Debenhams will have their promised pension benefits restored after Clara-Pensions announced Thursday it would take on the scheme in the U.K.'s second-ever superfund transaction.

  • March 14, 2024

    Council Victimized Worker With Weekly In-Office Requirement

    A local authority in Scotland must pay a disabled employee over £16,000 ($20,376) after an employment tribunal found the council's requirement to work one day a week in the office exacerbated the worker's anxiety and depression.

  • March 14, 2024

    Aid Charity Fired Lockdown 'Shisha Cave' Whistleblower

    A humanitarian charity made an employee redundant in retaliation for her blowing the whistle about colleagues smoking and potentially taking illegal drugs in its offices during a COVID-19 lockdown, a U.K. employment tribunal has ruled.

  • March 14, 2024

    Advisers Want Tax Reduction For Pensions, Aegon Says

    Many British financial advisers want the government to reduce taxes as part of pension reforms following the next general election, insurance firm Aegon UK said Thursday.

  • March 14, 2024

    Insurer Completes Full Construction Co. Pension Scheme Deal

    Insurer Just Group said on Thursday that it has completed a £37 million ($47.3 million) buy-out of a pension scheme sponsored by a leading engineering and construction company, finishing the process that it started in 2013.

  • March 14, 2024

    CMS Leads Rothesay £6B Buy Of Scottish Widows Portfolio

    Pension insurer Rothesay Life said Thursday that it will buy Scottish Widows' £6 billion ($7.7 billion) portfolio of bulk annuities from Lloyds Banking Group PLC, in a transaction guided by CMS Cameron McKenna Nabarro Olswang LLP.

  • March 13, 2024

    Nurse Mistaken About Filing Time Limits Resurrects Claim

    An NHS nurse won a second crack at her unfair dismissal claims after an appellate tribunal ruled that she only missed the deadline to file because she was genuinely mistaken about the time limits.

  • March 13, 2024

    EU Parliament Overwhelmingly Passes Landmark AI Law

    European Union lawmakers voted overwhelmingly on Wednesday in favor of a first-of-its-kind artificial intelligence law, in a bid to help facilitate innovation while safeguarding the bloc's fundamental rights.

  • March 13, 2024

    Pensions Watchdog Workers Call Off Strike, Agree To Pay Deal

    Some 400 workers at The Pensions Regulator suspended their strike action after agreeing to a pay increase aligned with guidelines set for government employees, the watchdog said Wednesday.

  • March 13, 2024

    Saudi Gov't Loses Immunity Appeal After Solicitors Back Out

    An appeal by Saudia Arabia's British embassy against a religious discrimination claim brought by a former employee was dismissed on Wednesday after the diplomatic outpost failed to pay its solicitors at RPC to continue representing it.

  • March 13, 2024

    Norton Pension Scam Victims Receive Initial £9.4M Redress

    Former employees of Norton Motorcycles received £9.4 million ($12 million) into their pension schemes from the Fraud Compensation Fund this week, an independent trustee told a group of senior MPs on Wednesday.

  • March 13, 2024

    Apprentice Wins £25K After Telecoms Biz Cut Role Short

    A telecommunications company must pay a former apprentice £25,000 ($32,000) after breaching his contract by cutting ties with him before the end of his term, a Scottish tribunal has ruled.

  • March 13, 2024

    'Significant' Gaps Remain In UK Pension Provision, FCA Says

    Automatic enrollment should be recognized as a success, but gaps around the retirement saving provision remain, the Financial Conduct Authority's chief executive said Wednesday, raising questions about Britain's current and future pension landscape.

  • March 13, 2024

    All Post Office Convictions To Be Quashed Through New Law

    The government introduced landmark legislation on Wednesday that will exonerate hundreds of people wrongfully convicted as the result of the Post Office scandal.

  • March 12, 2024

    Civil Servants Appeal For 2nd Shot At Age Bias Challenge

    Twenty civil servants argued Tuesday that they were not given a fair shot at their claim that a redundancy compensation scheme was unjustifiably biased against older staff.

  • March 12, 2024

    Staffer Who Sent Sex Doll To Boss Unfairly Axed By Tech Biz

    A tech company unfairly fired an employee who sent their manager a sex doll, an employment tribunal ruled, although it also rejected the staffer's bid for £16 million ($20.6 million) in damages and their request to be reinstated.

  • March 12, 2024

    Italian Can Sue South African Wildlife TV Channel In The UK

    An Italian citizen working in South Africa can sue a popular wildlife channel in the U.K., after an employment tribunal ruled that he was effectively treated like a local worker and paid his taxes as one.

  • March 12, 2024

    £100B Of UK Pension Surplus Could Be Returned To Sponsors

    An estimated £100 billion ($128 billion) could boost British businesses and workers over the next decade if retirement savings plans continue to run on after the point at which they're fully funded, a consultancy said Tuesday.

  • March 12, 2024

    UK Pension Deals Hit Record-Breaking £50B In 2023

    The total value of pension transfer deals in the U.K. hit a record-breaking £50 billion ($64 billion) in 2023, Hymans Robertson said Tuesday, with the number of transactions also eclipsing previous highs.

  • March 12, 2024

    Axed Greggs Staffer Warned Off Racism Complaint Wins £21K

    A tribunal has scolded Greggs for its handling of an employee's racial discrimination claim and awarded the staffer £21,400 ($27,400) after the bakery chain botched a probe into whether he took unauthorized leave before unfairly firing him and two others.

  • March 11, 2024

    Whistleblower Forced To Quit After Questioning CEO's CV

    A chief operating officer at a charity was forced to resign after senior figures said his whistleblowing claims about the new chief executive's CV had ruined their trust in him, an employment tribunal has ruled.

  • March 11, 2024

    Santander Whistleblower Loses Bid To Revive Claim

    An appellate tribunal has rejected a bid by a former financial crime policy manager at Santander to revive her whistleblowing and discrimination claims against the bank, ruling a fair trial was not possible because she failed to exchange witness statements.

  • March 11, 2024

    Insolvency Service Makes Progress on Gender Pay, Diversity

    Discrepancies in salaries between men and women at the Insolvency Service narrowed further by five percentage points in 2023, the bankruptcy administrator has revealed in its latest gender pay gap report, with women now making up more than half of its workforce.

  • March 11, 2024

    MPs To Hear From Administrators In Norton Pension Scandal

    A parliamentary committee said Monday that it will weigh whether victims of pension fraud can receive compensation faster as the first part of its probe into the retirement savings scandal at Norton Motorcycle Co.  

  • March 11, 2024

    FCA Fines British Steel Pensions Firm, Bans Advisers

    The finance watchdog said Monday that it has hit a financial advice company with a fine and banned two former employees after discovering failures by the business when it put through £90 million ($115 million) of retirement savings transfers for members of the British Steel Pension Scheme.

Expert Analysis

  • Wearing Religious Signs At Work: The Evolving EU Case Law

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    Based on a recent European Court of Justice ruling, the main criterion for allowing employers to prohibit employees from wearing religious signs on the basis of a policy of neutrality seems to be whether a genuine need exists for doing so, making it harder for employers to apply such a policy, says Chris Van Olmen at Van Olmen & Wynant.

  • What Slovak Labor Code Changes Will Mean For Employers

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    With newly effective amendments to the Slovak Labor Code strengthening employees’ rights in a number of ways, the default mindset of the employee being the weaker party may no longer be the right approach, says Katarina Pfeffer at Bird & Bird.

  • An ICO Reminder On Managing Subject Access Requests

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    Although the U.K. Information Commissioner's Office’s recent seven reprimands regarding mismanagement of data subject access requests are unusual, it is worth organizations considering what resources and training may be available to ensure these are properly managed in the future, says Ross McKenzie at Addleshaw Goddard.

  • Managing The Complexities Of Workers' UK Pregnancy Rights

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    As understanding and complying with maternity rights in the workplace can be tricky, Anna Fletcher and Jane Gowling at Gowling provide an overview of the main risk areas, including redundancy and in vitro fertilization, and highlight recently proposed reforms.

  • 10 Noteworthy Employment Law Developments From 2022

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    Richard Kenyon and Ranjit Dhindsa at Fieldfisher review notable regulations, decisions and legislation in U.K. employment law over the last year, covering flexible work, fire and rehire practices, and diversity and inclusion.

  • Proposed Bill May Change Workplace Sexual Harassment Law

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    The likely implementation of a private members' bill to extend employers' obligations concerning sexual harassment at work means employers should take steps now to ensure they are on the front foot if and when these changes come into force, say Gareth Brahams and Amanda Steadman at BDBF.

  • Key Takeaways From New SRA Sexual Misconduct Guidance

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    It is clear from the Solicitors Regulation Authority’s new sexual misconduct guidance that individuals need to adopt the highest standards of conduct in their professional and personal lives, and firms have a key role in both setting and implementing those standards to create a diverse and inclusive culture, says Andrew Pavlovic at CM Murray.

  • Digital Nomads: Key Considerations For Global Businesses

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    As employers and employees embrace remote, location-independent work arrangements enabled by technology, they must be mindful of the employment law and tax consequences such arrangements may trigger, say Hannah Wilkins and Audrey Elliott at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • German Labor Court Takes Surprising Stance On Disclosure

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    A German labor court's recent ruling regarding an employer's disclosure of the number and names of employees identified as "severely disabled" will surprise practitioners in the data protection and diversity spaces, who may question the justification for aspects of the decision, say Hannah Disselbeck and Marco Hermann at Fieldfisher.

  • A Look At The Increase In Employee Ownership Trusts

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    The rise in employee ownership trusts has brought certain challenges, but with tax advantages and a proven positive impact on individuals, businesses and regional economies, employee buyouts are set to become more popular and could outstrip mainstream deal activity, says ​​​​​​​Lisa Hayward at Birketts.

  • Employment Ruling Takes A New Look At Settlement Waivers

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    The recent Scottish Employment Appeal Tribunal decision in Bathgate v. Technip U.K. demonstrates that a waiver in a settlement agreement must relate expressly to the circumstances of the individual case, and that it is no longer possible to dismiss a prospective claim simply by including a reference to unfair dismissal or the Equality Act 2010, says David Whincup at Squire Patton.

  • Series

    My Favorite Law Prof: How I Learned To Argue Open-Mindedly

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    Queens College President Frank Wu reflects on how Yale Kamisar’s teaching and guidance at the University of Michigan Law School emphasized a capacity to engage with alternative worldviews and the importance of the ability to argue for both sides of a debate.

  • Employment Ruling Shows Value Of Dismissal Alternatives

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    The recent Employment Appeal Tribunal ruling in Department of Work and Pensions v. Boyers demonstrates that employers should ensure that alternatives have been properly considered before dismissing a disabled employee, since it can be difficult to show that a proportionate approach has been taken in the decision-making process, say Asten Hawkes and Larissa Hawkins at BDB Pitmans.

  • How Proposed Forced Labor Product Ban Affects Biz With EU

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    The European Commission's recently proposed regulation banning products made with forced labor in the European Union highlights the importance for multinational companies to enhance their human rights due diligence programs to meet fast-evolving standards and requirements of doing business in the region, say Sarah Bishop and Paul Mertenskötter at Covington.

  • FCA Pension Scheme Case Highlights Issues Ripe For Reform

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    The Financial Conduct Authority's response to the British Steel Pension Scheme case exposed wider issues within its regulatory approach and could demonstrate the need for industrywide reforms to minimize the risks with transferring out of a pension scheme, say Oliver Reece and Larisa Gordan at PwC.

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