Employment UK

  • February 23, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen Tesco target competing retailer Lidl with a copyright claim as they battle in the Court of Appeal over the design of Tesco’s Clubcard, the directors of a taxi business sue the creator of an AI route mapping app for professional negligence, Global Aerospace Underwriting Managers tackle an aviation claim by an Irish investment company, and Robert Bull hit with a general commercial contracts claim by Hancock Finance.

  • February 23, 2024

    Ex-Bevan Brittan Solicitor Stuck Off Over Antisemitic Tweets

    A former lawyer with Bevan Brittan LLP who sent abusive and antisemitic tweets about prominent U.K. figures, including a well-known barrister, was struck off by a tribunal on Friday.

  • February 23, 2024

    Pensions Regulator To Rejig Oversight Of Workplace Schemes

    The Pensions Regulator has said it will create three new regulatory functions as part of a strategic overhaul it said would meet the demands of a changing marketplace of fewer, but larger schemes.

  • February 23, 2024

    Transgender Judge Hopes To Return 'When Hate Subsides'

    Britain's only transgender judge said on Friday that she hopes to return to public office "when hate subsides" after she resigned over concerns that she risked politicizing the judiciary if she remained on the bench. 

  • February 23, 2024

    Compensation Scheme To Cover £38M Pensions Transfer Cost

    The Financial Services Compensation Scheme has said that it has put up £38 million ($48 million) so that clients of a failed pension provider would not take a hit when transferring their long-term savings elsewhere.

  • February 22, 2024

    Fired Fund Exec Gets Deposit Order Axed In Harassment Feud

    A tribunal was too quick to impose a deposit order and decide that a compliance chief is unlikely to succeed in his £2 million ($2.53 million) claim that an investment fund unfairly axed him after a member of its legal and compliance departments accused him of sexual harassment, an appeals judge has ruled.

  • February 22, 2024

    Hospital Forced Chef To Quit By Not Sharing COVID Measures

    A tribunal has ruled that a U.K. mental healthcare business forced a hospital chef to quit by repeatedly ignoring his requests for a COVID-19 risk assessment when it asked him to return to work during the outbreak.

  • February 22, 2024

    Employers Told To Step Up Support For Menopausal Workers

    Bosses will have to take active steps to help accommodate the symptoms of menopausal workers or risk legal action under new guidance published Thursday from the U.K.'s equality watchdog.

  • February 22, 2024

    Gov't Sets Out New Law To Clear Post Office Scandal Victims

    The government promised on Thursday to introduce "unprecedented" legislation before the end of July to exonerate hundreds of innocent people wrongly convicted in the Post Office IT scandal.

  • February 22, 2024

    Going Broke Is Top Concern For Retirement Clients

    More than 70% of financial advisers report their retirement clients fear they will outlast their money, according to research published Thursday by insurer Aegon UK.

  • February 21, 2024

    Face Mask May Have Triggered PTSD, Tribunal Rules

    A school technician has revived his disability discrimination case after an appellate panel ruled in a decision published Wednesday there was proof to back up his concerns that being forced to wear a face mask during the pandemic would trigger his post-traumatic stress disorder. 

  • February 21, 2024

    Oxford University Academics Win Employee Status Challenge

    Two University of Oxford academics count as having been employed by the institution even though it hired them on temporary contracts designed to dodge an employer-employee relationship, a tribunal ruled in a decision made public Wednesday.

  • February 21, 2024

    Temp Workers Entitled To Dismissal Reasons, ECJ Rules

    When employers fire temporary workers they must tell them why, because not doing so could prevent them from legally challenging their dismissal, The European Union's top court said Tuesday.

  • February 21, 2024

    Pitmans Can't Strike Out Negligent Pension Advice Claim

    Pitmans Solicitors, BDB Pitmans' predecessor, has failed to strike out allegations that it gave former clients negligent advice on a pension scheme, after a London court found Wednesday that it is "clearly in the interests of justice" that the case proceed against it.

  • February 21, 2024

    Addison Lee Settles With Lead Claimants In Drivers' Claim

    Minicab giant Addison Lee has settled a long-running dispute with its drivers over their status as workers and their related employee protections such as holiday pay and minimum wage, with lawyers for the drivers hailing the settlement on Wednesday as a win for gig economy workers.

  • February 21, 2024

    Insurer QBE Narrows Gender Pay Gap, But Bonuses An Issue

    QBE UK has said the gender pay gap has fallen across its organization and is below the wider gap seen in the insurance industry, despite the gender bonus divide remaining "an issue" at the insurer.

  • February 21, 2024

    Pension Climate Reporting Has 'Failed To Shift UK Investment'

    The government's climate reporting regime for pensions providers has failed to produce a meaningful shift in investment behavior away from fossil fuels, experts warned lawmakers on Wednesday.

  • February 21, 2024

    Royal Parks Fights Contractor-Staff Comparison In Pay Appeal

    Britain's Royal Parks argued Wednesday that contracted cleaners cannot compare themselves with its directly employed staff, as it fought the contractors' case in the Court of Appeal that their lower rate of pay amounted to race discrimination.

  • February 21, 2024

    Finance Firms Shuttered For £3M Loan Notes Fraud

    Two financial firms have been wound up after misleading investors into putting at least £3 million ($3.8 million) into an unprotected bond scheme, according to the Insolvency Service.

  • February 21, 2024

    2 UK Law Firms Failed To Pay Minimum Wage, Gov't Says

    Two law firms have compensated staff after paying them thousands of pounds less than they should have under minimum wage regulations, the government has said.

  • February 21, 2024

    Burges Salmon Leads Insurer's £11M Spar Pension Deal

    Insurer Just Group said on Wednesday that it has completed an £11 million ($13.8 million) pension buy-in transaction with Spar (UK) Ltd., in a deal guided by Burges Salmon LLP.

  • February 20, 2024

    Sodexo OK To Sack Prison Officer Over 'Torrent Of Abuse'

    An employment tribunal has ruled that prison management company Sodexo rightly fired a prison officer for gross misconduct after a prisoner accused him of a "torrent of abuse."

  • February 20, 2024

    Fire Brigade Workers Fight To Overturn Pensions Loss

    The firefighters union urged an appeals court on Tuesday to overturn its failed bid to prove that HM Treasury unfairly distributed costs when compensating workers who had received unlawful pensions in the past, arguing that the policy caused sex, age and race discrimination.

  • February 20, 2024

    Firm Faces Claim From Cleaner Fired For Eating Leftovers

    A cleaner is planning to sue a London law firm and its private cleaning contractor after bosses allegedly fired her for eating a tuna sandwich that lawyers had left behind after a meeting, a trade union has said.

  • February 20, 2024

    Aspiring Judge Loses Race Bias Case Over Failed Application

    An Asian-British solicitor has lost his case accusing a High Court judge of downgrading his application for a judicial post because he wasn't white, with a tribunal concluding that his failure had "nothing whatsoever" to do with his race.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Nestle Ruling Shows Supply Chain Human Rights Flaws

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    The Supreme Court's recent ruling in Nestle v. Doe — blocking claims that chocolate makers aided and abetted child slavery in Africa — underscores the need for federal legislation to ensure that U.S. corporation supply chains are not complicit in human rights abuses overseas, says Alexandra Dufresne at the Zurich University of Applied Sciences.

  • Addressing Environmental Justice As Part Of ESG Initiatives

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    Recent calls for racial equity and government regulators' increasing focus on social and environmental concerns make this a good time for companies to integrate environmental justice into their environmental, social and governance efforts, say Stacey Halliday and Julius Redd at Beveridge & Diamond, and Jesse Glickstein at Hewlett Packard.

  • 2 UK Pension Cases Guide On 3rd-Party Due Diligence

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    The U.K. Court of Appeal's recent decision in Adams v. Options UK, and upcoming hearing in Financial Conduct Authority v. Avacade, highlight important precautions self-invested personal pension operators should take when dealing with unauthorized third parties, says Paul Ashcroft at Wedlake Bell.

  • US Cos. Must Get Ready For EU Human Rights, Climate Policy

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    The European Union will likely adopt new human rights and climate change regulations for corporations — so U.S. companies and investors should assess their risk exposure and implement compliance processes tailored to their industries, locations and supply chains, say David Lakhdhir and Mark Bergman at Paul Weiss.

  • What Growing Focus On ESG Means For Insurers

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    As the world pays steadily more attention to environmental, social and governance issues, insurers and reinsurers will need to integrate ESG risks into their underwriting and compliance efforts, but doing so will help attract consumers and achieve positive investment returns, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • 5 Ways To Address Heightened Forced Labor Compliance Risk

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    In response to ever-increasing enforcement efforts targeting forced labor, companies can leverage available resources to assess conditions in their supply chains and avoid unintended imports and exports with entities known for human rights violations, say Joyce Rodriguez and Francesca Guerrero at Thompson Hine.

  • UK Whistleblowing Laws May Be Ripe For Reform

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    COVID-19 has reignited calls to expand U.K. whistleblowing laws, with many advocating for enhanced reporting protections and independent oversight of cases, says Pia Sanchez at CM Murray.

  • G4S Deferral Agreement Illustrates SFO's Enforcement Focus

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    The Serious Fraud Office’s recent deferred prosecution agreement with multinational security services company G4S suggests the agency’s approach to compliance, program remediation and corporate renewal is evolving to favor parent company involvement and the appointment of independent compliance monitors, say Chris Roberts and James Ford at Mayer Brown.

  • Opinion

    Time To Fix Human Rights Abuses In US Gov't Supply Chains

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    The U.S. government buys goods made in global supply chains where human and labor rights violations are commonplace, so to drive better rights compliance among contractors, it should adopt six key reforms to the federal procurement process, says Isabelle Glimcher at the New York University Stern School of Business.

  • Opinion

    Reflections On The UK Bribery Act 10 Years On

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    While the U.K. Bribery Act has been positive overall, regulators should seek urgent reform to better enable the investigation and prosecution of companies and individuals for economic crimes, especially in cases directly harming people and the environment, says Chris Phillips at Alvarez & Marsal.

  • Human Rights Are Becoming A Compliance Issue

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    A recent commitment from the European Union's commissioner for justice to introduce rules for mandatory corporate human rights due diligence next year may signal the arrival of this issue as a global business imperative, making it as fundamental as anti-corruption diligence, say attorneys at Paul Hastings.

  • 5 Steps For Keeping Supply Chains Free Of Uighur Slavery

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    In light of a March report identifying 83 global brands suspected of supply chain links to forced labor of Uighurs — an ethnic minority long targeted by the Chinese government — companies should adopt certain procedures to identify red flags in their own supply chains, say Benjamin Britz and Rayhan Asat at Hughes Hubbard.

  • Perspectives

    Addressing Modern Slavery Inside And Outside The UK

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    As the problem of modern slavery persists, U.K. companies must take a broad approach when rooting out slave labor in their supply chains, and should not ignore the risk posed by suppliers within the U.K., says Maria Theodoulou of Stokoe.

  • UK Antitrust Watchdog Proposals Would Bolster Enforcement

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    The U.K. Competition and Markets Authority's proposals for reshaping competition enforcement and consumer protection would shift the historical balance in U.K. competition policy, increasing regulatory burden on companies while weakening judicial scrutiny of CMA actions, says Bill Batchelor of Skadden.

  • UK's New 'Name And Shame' Approach To Anti-Trafficking

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    There has been considerable anxiety and speculation from companies over the annual transparency statement required by the U.K. Modern Slavery Act, but a recent tender announcement from the U.K. Home Office provides key insights into what to expect, say attorneys with Perkins Coie.

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