Employment UK

  • January 19, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen a bankrupt English local council bring a construction claim against property maintenance company Axis, a Cypriot cheese trade protection body appeal a UK IPO decision granting trademark registration for "Grilloumi" and employees of supermarket giant Morrison’s shop around for compensation in a claim over equal pay. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • January 19, 2024

    Rugby Players Win Redundancy Payouts From Defunct Clubs

    More than 150 former London Irish, Worcester Warriors and Wasps rugby players and staff have won redundancy payouts after the Employment Tribunal ruled that the clubs failed to consult players and workers about mass layoffs as the clubs collapsed.

  • January 19, 2024

    FCA Able To Insist On Office Work In Manager's Claim

    The Financial Conduct Authority has beaten a manager's bid to continue working full-time remotely, as the Employment Tribunal ruled that the regulator "clearly established" that her performance would suffer — even though she had been doing so successfully for more than two years.

  • January 19, 2024

    Pension Surplus Rules Could Bring Change For Deals Market

    The pensions deal market could be reshaped this year by changes to how companies are able to use surpluses from their savings plans, consultancy Mercer Ltd. has said.

  • January 19, 2024

    Gov't Urged To Rethink 'Pot For Life' Pension Reforms

    The government has been urged to reconsider its plan to introduce a retirement savings "pot for life" for workers, as finance experts said on Friday the reforms are the wrong measures introduced at the wrong time.

  • January 19, 2024

    Sexual Misconduct Crackdown In Legal Profession Ramps Up

    Six years after the #MeToo movement prompted a worldwide reckoning over sexual harassment, the legal industry's regulators are taking greater enforcement action. Law360 looks here at how the sector is tackling the problem in the workplace.

  • January 18, 2024

    Analyst In Zoom Call Exposure Case Beats Evidence Appeal

    A City analyst alleged to have deliberately showed a colleague his underwear on a Zoom call defeated an appeal against his wrongful dismissal claim on Thursday, with a tribunal rejecting his former employer's argument the burden of proof was too high.

  • January 18, 2024

    ECJ Says EU Workers Can Get Holiday Pay After Resignation

    The European Union's highest court ruled on Thursday that workers who have resigned can convert their unused paid annual leave into a lump sum if their failure to go on holiday was not under their control.

  • January 18, 2024

    Advisers See Rising Demand After Pension Tax Reforms

    Almost half of U.K. financial firms offering retirement advice have seen demand for retirement planning rise as a result of changes to the pension tax allowance, according to research published Thursday.

  • January 18, 2024

    Pensions Body Warns UK Gov't Over 'Pot For Life' Reforms

    The U.K. government's proposed fix for the spiraling number of small pension pots in existence risks creating "more problems than it solves," retirement savings experts warned on Thursday.

  • January 18, 2024

    Depressed Broker Forced To Quit Due To Unfair Treatment

    A manager at an insurance broker was constructively dismissed and discriminated against because of her depression and anxiety, a tribunal has ruled, finding that bosses no longer valued her after a mental health absence.

  • January 18, 2024

    Life Insurers Likely To Pass On Interest, Fitch Says

    Fitch Ratings has said it expects U.K. life insurers will pass on the interest they earn from customer cash balances instead of banking it to avoid harm to their reputations and being named and shamed by the Financial Conduct Authority.

  • January 17, 2024

    Ex-Forex Trader's Doc-Hiding Claim Against Lloyds Tossed

    A former forex trader has failed in his bid to pursue Lloyds Bank for allegedly suppressing evidence when it fought his whistleblowing claim, with a London tribunal judge ruling Wednesday that he used the wrong legal procedure.

  • January 17, 2024

    Teacher Fired For Alleging Racism At Work Wins Bias Case

    A Black teacher in Manchester was unfairly dismissed for submitting a counter grievance saying colleagues were uncomfortable with her race, the Employment Tribunal has ruled, saying her dismissal hearing was botched.

  • January 17, 2024

    FCA Probes Banks, Insurers For Non-Financial Misconduct

    Financial Conduct Authority executives told MPs at a parliamentary hearing on the "Sexism and the City" inquiry on Wednesday that the regulator has started an investigation into how banks and insurers deal with non-financial misconduct, amid evidence that firms are not acting against known offenders.

  • January 17, 2024

    Driver Loses Appeal After Racial Abuse Blackmail Attempt

    A forklift driver for a printing business has lost an appeal against his discrimination claim after he tried to use a false claim of racial abuse to pressure his managers into giving him a pay rise.

  • January 17, 2024

    Broker Axed From Group Chat On Maternity Leave Wins Claim

    A dental broker has won her discrimination and victimization claim after a tribunal ruled that her employers did not allow her access to a WhatsApp group chat with colleagues after she was removed during maternity leave.

  • January 17, 2024

    Average Pension Transfer Time Climbs 17% In 3 Years

    The average time it takes for the transfer of retirement savings has increased 17% over the last three years, a pensions consolidator has said, calling it "concerning" as it repeated calls for defined regulation to guarantee a 10-day window.

  • January 16, 2024

    Ex-Forex Trader Accuses Lloyds Of Withholding Evidence

    A former forex trader is suing Lloyds Bank in a London tribunal, saying that it withheld evidence of alleged misconduct by other forex traders at the bank and misled the tribunal when he previously pursued a whistleblowing claim against it.

  • January 16, 2024

    Fujitsu Knew About IT System Issues, Worker Tells Inquiry

    Fujitsu assured the courts during legal action against sub-postmasters that its Horizon system was working properly despite knowing this was not the case, an employee speaking at the Post Office inquiry said Tuesday.

  • January 16, 2024

    Solicitor Loses Whistleblowing Case Over CMS Conflict Claim

    A senior lawyer working for Chinese property developer R&F Group has lost her whistleblowing case, after a tribunal ruled that she was not sacked for raising concerns that the international law firm CMS had a conflict of interest over one of its projects.

  • January 16, 2024

    Academic With ADHD Says 'No PhD, No Promotion' Is Biased

    A neurodivergent academic asked a London appeals court on Tuesday to overturn a ruling that being repeatedly rejected for a promotion did not amount to disability discrimination.

  • January 16, 2024

    Travers Smith Guides £140M Pension Deal For Office Depot

    An office supplies retailer has offloaded £140 million ($177 million) of its U.K. pension liabilities to Aviva PLC, the insurer said Tuesday, in a deal steered by Travers Smith LLP.

  • January 16, 2024

    IT Body Seeks Review Of Presumption That Computer Is Right

    The legal presumption that computer systems data is correct should be urgently reviewed after hundreds of Post Office workers were wrongly convicted on the basis of faulty software, an IT trade body has said.

  • January 16, 2024

    Worker Fired For Filming Joke Striptease Wins Payout

    An employment tribunal has ordered a coach company to pay £19,600 ($24,750) to an operations manager it fired for jokingly filming a colleague doing a striptease, ruling that he was unfairly and wrongfully dismissed.

Expert Analysis

  • Court Of Appeal Charts Path For COVID Dismissal Claims

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    The Court of Appeal's first COVID-19-related health and safety dismissal decision reassures employers that they can defend claims if they demonstrate they took steps to reduce the risk of infection, or any other type of workplace health and safety risk, in a clear and practical way, says Kathryn Clapp at Taylor Wessing.

  • Lessons To Be Learned From Twitter's Latest Hacking Scandal

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    Following the report of a recent data breach at Twitter, it is clearly vital for companies to adhere to best practices in data protection and IT security arrangements, including technical measures, and proper processes and procedures that mitigate risk and provide adequate training for staff, says Simon Ridding at Keller Postman.

  • UK Court Reinforces High Bar In Human Rights Investigations

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    Although the recent U.K. High Court decision in World Uyghur Congress v. Secretary of State found that a high evidential threshold must be cleared to investigate human rights abuses, this is not to be seen as an incentive for companies to ease back on their supply chain risk management and due diligence procedures, says Lloyd Firth at WilmerHale.

  • How New UK Subsidy Control Rules Will Differ From EU Law

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    The newly effective Subsidy Control Act contains key differences to the previously applicable EU state aid laws, and legal practitioners should familiarize themselves with the new regime, ensuring that their public sector clients are aware of the challenges it presents, say attorneys at Shepherd and Wedderburn.

  • Preparing For EU's Pay Gap Reporting Directive

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    An agreement has been reached on the European Union Pay Transparency Directive, paving the way for gender pay gap reporting to become compulsory for many employers across Europe, introducing a more proactive approach than the similar U.K. regime and leading the way on new global standards for equal pay, say attorneys at Lewis Silkin.

  • Why Employers Must Address Differences In UK And EU Law

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    Amid globalization and more location-fluid working arrangements, it is crucial that employers recognize and address the differences between U.K. and EU laws in several workforce management areas, including worker representation, pay and benefits, termination of employment, and diversity and inclusion, says Hannah Wilkins at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • How UK Employment Revisions Could Improve On EU Laws

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    There is concern that the U.K. Retained EU Law Bill might remove the numerous protections provided to employees by EU law, but it could bring with it the chance to make better the pieces of law that currently cause employers the biggest headaches, says Simon Fennell at Shoosmiths.

  • Private MP Bills Could Drive Employment Law Reform

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    Instead of a single Employment Bill, the U.K. government is supporting various private proposals by backbench members of Parliament, and cross-party support may mean this process provides a viable route for reforming employment law, says Jonathan Naylor at Shoosmiths.

  • An Irish Perspective On The Women On Boards Directive

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    The EU Women on Boards Directive marks a discernible gear shift in the campaign to achieve gender balance at board level that Irish listed companies must engage with, and those that embark on change now will be well placed to succeed under the new regime, say attorneys at Matheson.

  • UK Ruling Adds Clarity To Duty Of Good Faith In Contracts

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    The recent U.K. Court of Appeal decision in Compound Photonics Group on the implied duty of good faith in commercial contracts ties in with the established requirement to act rationally, although courts are still reluctant to set out a list of minimum standards that will apply in all circumstances, say Louise Freeman and Alan Kenny at Covington.

  • Wearing Religious Signs At Work: The Evolving EU Case Law

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    Based on a recent European Court of Justice ruling, the main criterion for allowing employers to prohibit employees from wearing religious signs on the basis of a policy of neutrality seems to be whether a genuine need exists for doing so, making it harder for employers to apply such a policy, says Chris Van Olmen at Van Olmen & Wynant.

  • What Slovak Labor Code Changes Will Mean For Employers

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    With newly effective amendments to the Slovak Labor Code strengthening employees’ rights in a number of ways, the default mindset of the employee being the weaker party may no longer be the right approach, says Katarina Pfeffer at Bird & Bird.

  • An ICO Reminder On Managing Subject Access Requests

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    Although the U.K. Information Commissioner's Office’s recent seven reprimands regarding mismanagement of data subject access requests are unusual, it is worth organizations considering what resources and training may be available to ensure these are properly managed in the future, says Ross McKenzie at Addleshaw Goddard.

  • Managing The Complexities Of Workers' UK Pregnancy Rights

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    As understanding and complying with maternity rights in the workplace can be tricky, Anna Fletcher and Jane Gowling at Gowling provide an overview of the main risk areas, including redundancy and in vitro fertilization, and highlight recently proposed reforms.

  • 10 Noteworthy Employment Law Developments From 2022

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    Richard Kenyon and Ranjit Dhindsa at Fieldfisher review notable regulations, decisions and legislation in U.K. employment law over the last year, covering flexible work, fire and rehire practices, and diversity and inclusion.

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