Employment

  • April 02, 2024

    Arizona Cardinals Must Pay $3M For Defaming Former Exec

    The Arizona Cardinals have been ordered to pay nearly $3 million for defaming a former vice president while dismissing him from the team, with a league-appointed arbitrator faulting the team for falsely suggesting the executive committed domestic violence.

  • April 02, 2024

    Amazon Trims, But Can't End Ex-Worker's Disability Bias Suit

    A California federal judge partially denied Amazon's bid to escape a former worker's suit alleging he was pushed out because of a knee injury stemming from his military service, but threw out claims stemming from bias based on his veteran status, race and age.

  • April 02, 2024

    Emirates Can't Sink COVID-19 Severance Suit

    A New York federal judge refused to toss a proposed class action alleging the airline Emirates withheld severance from American workers after they were furloughed and then let go during the COVID-19 pandemic, ruling the employees showed they may have been owed extra money.

  • April 02, 2024

    Philly Uber Class Action Atty Heads To Lichten & Liss-Riordan

    One of the attorneys representing a proposed class of Philadelphia Uber drivers in their wage suit against the company left the Steel City's Pietragallo Gordon Alfano Bosick & Raspanti LLP for the new New Jersey office of Lichten & Liss-Riordan PC, his co-counsel in the ride-hailing case.

  • April 02, 2024

    Investment Adviser Wants Stolen Clients Suit Trimmed

    An investment adviser and her new firm told a Florida court on Monday that the parent holding company of her former employer Mercer Global Advisors does not have standing to pursue its claims that she stole its clients and interfered with its business.

  • April 01, 2024

    Ga. Judicial Watchdog Wants Probate Judge Off The Bench

    A three-member panel of Georgia's Judicial Qualifications Commission has recommended a Douglas County probate judge be removed from the bench following accusations that she violated the state's Code of Judicial Conduct on social media and jailed a woman seeking to amend her marriage record.

  • April 01, 2024

    Musk's X Corp. Helps Ex-Block Worker Fired Over Posts Sue

    A former employee at Block Inc., which was founded by Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey, alleges the company fired her in retaliation for two posts she made on X, formerly known as Twitter, according to a suit filed in Missouri state court with financial backing from Elon Musk's X Corp.

  • April 01, 2024

    Fla. Judge Refuses To Pause Wage Rule For H-2A Workers

    A Florida federal judge on Friday adopted a magistrate judge's recommendation to uphold a U.S. Department of Labor rule raising the wages of H-2A agricultural workers, rejecting objections from farm groups that the report was overly deferential to the government's arguments.

  • April 01, 2024

    Milliman Lost 401(k) Funds On Unproven Strategy, Judge Told

    Milliman's risky investments cost its employees' retirement plan more than $50 million and were part of a failed "experiment" to benefit its own bottom line, a class of employees told a Washington federal judge on Monday, kicking off a bench trial seeking to recover their losses.

  • April 01, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Last week, Delaware's Court of Chancery saw a $42.5 million settlement, dismissal of two big suits with two more remanded back, and new cases from shareholders of Walt Disney, Donald Trump's Truth Social, Rivian Automotive and BarkBox.

  • April 01, 2024

    Judge Won't Ice EEOC's Race Bias Suit Against Tesla

    Tesla can't put off or dodge a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission lawsuit alleging the carmaker allowed rampant racism to overtake a California factory, a federal judge has ruled, saying parallel state court cases can't resolve the agency's claims.

  • April 01, 2024

    Bankrupt Coal Co.'s Affiliates Beat $6.5B Union Pension Suit

    A bankrupt coal company's affiliates have dodged claims that they owe $6.5 billion to a union pension plan, with a Washington, D.C., federal judge holding that the plan's trustees lacked standing to sue under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act because one trustee wasn't properly appointed.

  • April 01, 2024

    9th Circ. Revives Janitor's Representative Wage Claims

    The Ninth Circuit reversed a district court's order that dismissed representative claims against janitorial franchiser Coverall North America Inc. under California's Private Attorneys General Act, saying a change in legal precedent allows nonindividual claims to stay in court while individual claims undergo arbitration.

  • April 01, 2024

    Ex-Pharma Co. Exec Denies Signing Noncompete Deal

    The former director of government sales for a pharmaceutical company asked the North Carolina Business Court on Friday to knock out a breach of contract claim in a lawsuit that alleges he took trade secrets to a competitor, arguing the company has no valid noncompete agreement to back it up.

  • April 01, 2024

    Feds Back Guilty Verdict After Software Execs' Tax Fraud Trial

    Federal prosecutors on Monday defended a jury verdict finding two former software executives in North Carolina guilty of failing to pay employment taxes, saying sufficient evidence supported their convictions.

  • April 01, 2024

    Mich. Can't Get Immunity In Courthouse ADA Class Action

    Attorneys with disabilities and a disability rights advocate can proceed with a proposed class action aimed at forcing accessibility improvements at several Michigan courthouses and government buildings, a Michigan federal judge ruled Saturday, rejecting the state's argument that it was immune from the suit.  

  • April 01, 2024

    Mass. Top Court At A Loss Over 7-Eleven Wage Case

    The top court in Massachusetts on Monday appeared stumped by whether owners of 7-Eleven franchisees should be classified as employees under state law, with one justice calling the issue "almost incomprehensible."

  • April 01, 2024

    Right-Wing Personality Hit With Severance Charge At NLRB

    Conservative media personality Steven Crowder was hit with a National Labor Relations Board charge alleging he's leaning on an illegal separation agreement in a suit to stop an ex-producer from speaking out about him.

  • April 01, 2024

    SmartRent Workers Get Class Cert. In Unpaid OT Row

    A Georgia federal judge has granted conditional class certification to a group of former and current employees of a smart home technology firm, who allege the company failed to compensate them correctly for overtime hours they worked.

  • April 01, 2024

    Union Backs USPS In Bias Suit That Went To High Court

    A Christian postal worker who claimed he was unlawfully punished for seeking Sundays off should lose his religious bias case under the standard the U.S. Supreme Court set when it revived his case in 2023, a letter carriers union told a Pennsylvania federal judge.

  • April 01, 2024

    Judge Won't Make EEOC Pay Atty Fees For Unsuccessful Suit

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission doesn't have to pay a Georgia hospital's attorney fees after jurors found in favor of the medical center on disability bias claims, a federal judge ruled, saying the jury's siding with the hospital didn't make the agency's suit frivolous.

  • April 01, 2024

    NJ Courts Get Out Of Suit Alleging Ex-Judge Harassed Official

    The New Jersey Administrative Office of the Courts has gotten out of a lawsuit from a municipal court administrator alleging she was sexually harassed by a former municipal court judge, arguing that the woman was never an employee of the office.

  • April 01, 2024

    Staten Island Firm Must Face Hostile Work Environment Claim

    A New York federal judge has partially dismissed an employment discrimination suit against a State Island law firm, nixing discrimination and retaliation claims brought by a Black former office manager while allowing claims over the firm's allegedly hostile work environment to proceed to trial.

  • April 01, 2024

    Ex-Exec Sues Canadian Hockey League Team Over Firing

    The former vice president of finance for the Canadian Hockey League's Portland Winterhawks has sued the team and its general manager, claiming that the general manager intended to get the former executive fired from his new job due to the unfounded belief that he embezzled money from the franchise.

  • April 01, 2024

    Fla. Atty Can't Escape $300K COVID Relief Fraud Conviction

    A Florida attorney fell short in trying to nix her conviction for conspiracy to commit wire fraud when a Georgia federal court found the jury heard and saw a "plethora" of evidence to show she submitted fraudulent loan applications in an effort to obtain money meant to help small businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Expert Analysis

  • Considerations For Lawyer Witnesses After FTX Trial

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    Sam Bankman-Fried's recent trial testimony about his lawyers' involvement in FTX's business highlights the need for attorney-witnesses to understand privilege issues in order to avoid costly discovery disputes and, potentially, uncover critical evidence an adversary might seek to conceal, says Lawrence Bluestone at Genova Burns.

  • Changes To Note In New AAA Mass Arbitration Rules

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    The American Arbitration Association updated its mass arbitration rules earlier this month — clarifying issues that were previously being litigated in front of the AAA, and significantly streamlining the process of getting to a merits arbitration for claimants who have suffered similar wrongs and are bound by mandatory arbitration clauses, say attorneys at Labaton Keller.

  • 9 Tools To Manage PAGA Claims After Calif. High Court Ruling

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    In Estrada v. Royalty Carpet Mills, the California Supreme Court recently dealt a blow to employers by ruling that courts cannot dismiss Private Attorneys General Act claims on manageability grounds, but defendants and courts can still use arbitration agreements, due process challenges and other methods when dealing with unmanageable claims, says Ryan Krueger at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Workplace Speech Policies Limit Legal And PR Risks

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    As workers increasingly speak out on controversies like the 2024 elections and the Israel-Hamas war, companies should implement practical workplace expression policies and plans to protect their brands and mitigate the risk of violating federal and state anti-discrimination and free speech laws, say attorneys at McDermott.

  • Staying Ahead Of The AI Policymaking Curve

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    With artificial intelligence poised to be the hottest legislative and regulatory topic in 2024, expect the AI policymaking toolbox to continue to expand and evolve as stakeholders in the U.S. and abroad develop, deploy, use and learn more about these technologies, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • The 7th Circ.'s Top 10 Civil Opinions Of 2023

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    Attorneys at Jenner & Block examine the most significant decisions issued by the Seventh Circuit in 2023, and explain how they may affect issues related to antitrust, constitutional law, federal jurisdiction and more.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Series

    In Focus At The EEOC: Preserving Legal System Access

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    The track records of and public commentary from U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission leaders — including two recently confirmed Democratic appointees — can provide insight into how the agency may approach access to justice priorities, as identified in its latest strategic enforcement plan, says Aniko Schwarcz at Cohen Milstein.

  • Mitigating Compliance And Litigation Risks Of Evolving Tech

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    Amid artificial intelligence and other technological advances, companies must prepare for the associated risks, including a growing suite of privacy regulations, enterprising class action theories and consumer protection challenges, and proliferating disclosure obligations, say attorneys at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Calif. High Court Ruling Outlines Limits On PAGA Actions

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    While the California Supreme Court’s ruling last week in Estrada v. Royalty Carpet Mills held that courts cannot dismiss Private Attorneys General Act claims on manageability grounds, the opinion also details how claims can be narrowed, providing a road map for defendants facing complex actions, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • NY Pay Frequency Cases May Soon Be A Thing Of The Past

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    Two recent developments in New York state have unfurled to suggest that the high tide of frequency-of-pay lawsuits may soon recede, giving employers the upper hand when defending against threatened or pending claims, say attorneys at Reed Smith.

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