Employment

  • April 08, 2024

    Drexel Didn't Accommodate Exec's Disability, Suit Claims

    Drexel University was accused Monday of discrimination by an administrator, who claimed its chief operating officer refused her request to meet one-on-one ahead of a group meeting with a subordinate and that the group meeting be held via telephone instead of video.

  • April 08, 2024

    Ex-USPS Worker Can Proceed With Disability Suit

    An Illinois federal judge refused to toss an ex-worker's lawsuit against the U.S. Postal Service, saying she had enough evidence to get her claim that she was denied overtime because of a wrist injury before a jury, but failed to show that age discrimination was at play.

  • April 08, 2024

    8th Circ. Upholds NLRB's Broad Remedies Against Meat Co.

    The Eighth Circuit on Monday upheld a National Labor Relations Board decision finding a meat processor in Nebraska illegally bargained in bad faith with a United Food and Commercial Workers affiliate, backing the board's broad remedies order that included reimbursing the union for negotiating expenses.

  • April 08, 2024

    McMahon Sells Millions More In TKO Stock Amid Abuse Suit

    WWE's disgraced founder Vince McMahon, who was recently accused of trafficking a former employee, continues to loosen his grip on the wrestling company he founded, most recently selling $311 million worth of stock in WWE's parent, according to a Monday securities filing.

  • April 08, 2024

    Conn. Worker Says Firing For Talking Wages Was Illegal

    A former employee of a company that designs and manufactures radiation detection devices accused the firm in Connecticut federal court of breaching state law by prohibiting him from discussing his pay with his colleagues and of firing him for telling a friend about receiving a raise.

  • April 08, 2024

    'Flagrant' $8.6M Embezzlement Scheme Nets 6-Year Sentence

    A former office manager who was caught stealing more than $8.6 million from the trucking logistics company where she worked was sentenced to six years in prison on Monday in Georgia federal court. 

  • April 08, 2024

    Ex-Paralegal Launches Whistleblower Suit Against NJ Firm

    An ex-paralegal at New Jersey personal injury law firm Brandon J. Broderick LLC says his former employer created an uncomfortable work place when he reported alleged ethical violations to management.

  • April 08, 2024

    Seyfarth Bolsters Dallas Shop With Hunton Employment Ace

    Seyfarth Shaw LLP has expanded the labor and employment department in its Dallas office after opening the office late last year, bringing on a former longtime Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP partner to serve as its founding L&E partner in the North Texas city, the firm announced on Monday.

  • April 08, 2024

    Jackson Hewitt Preparers Want First OK On $10.8M Deal

    Former Jackson Hewitt Inc. workers have reached a $10.8 million settlement with their former employer over claims the company's franchisees entered into an anti-competitive no-poach agreement despite the provision being removed from the company's franchise agreements, according to a Friday motion.

  • April 08, 2024

    Doctors Say MSU Vax Mandate Suit Needs High Court Review

    Three doctors urged the U.S. Supreme Court to take up a case challenging Michigan State University's vaccine mandate after the Sixth Circuit backed the suit's dismissal, arguing that the circuit court should have applied a stricter standard when considering whether the government could interfere with patients' medical decisions.

  • April 08, 2024

    Male Worker Says Female Colleague's Grudge Got Him Fired

    A financial services firm abruptly fired a sales producer without any investigation after a female colleague who wanted him gone made false accusations about him, the producer said in a suit filed in Texas federal court.

  • April 05, 2024

    Sean Combs Named In Suit Alleging Yacht Sex Assault By Son

    Sean "Diddy" Combs and his son, Christian Combs, were sued Thursday in California state court by a woman alleging the younger Combs sexually assaulted her aboard a yacht while she was working as a stewardess, and that there is an audio recording of part of the incident.

  • April 05, 2024

    Texas Univ. Coach Says Sexual Orientation Led To Firing

    A University of Texas at Rio Grande Valley assistant tennis coach has accused the school in federal court of letting her go after a "sham investigation" because she is gay.

  • April 05, 2024

    Neb. Beef Seller Says No Proof It Joined Wage-Fixing Scheme

    A Colorado federal judge gave a Nebraska beef wholesaler another chance to petition for dismissal from a class action accusing it of participating in a meat industry wage-fixing scheme, after the company filed a motion that didn't follow the court's page limit.

  • April 05, 2024

    Tesla Workers Skipped Breaks To Meet Quotas, Suit Says

    Two former warehouse workers hit Tesla with a proposed wage and hour class action Thursday in California federal court, alleging the electric carmaker violated labor laws by not providing sufficient break time, operating an illegal quota system and failing to pay all of their wages.

  • April 05, 2024

    Starbucks Tells Judge Union Dealings Aren't 'Mission Critical'

    Starbucks denied Friday that complying with federal labor law was "mission critical" to its business as it urged a Washington state judge to dismiss a shareholder suit accusing company leaders of union busting, which they say tanked Starbucks' reputation.

  • April 05, 2024

    NBC, Bravo Accused Of Racism By 'Vanderpump Rules' Alum

    "Vanderpump Rules" alumnus Faith Stowers sued NBC, Evolution Media and Bravo for discrimination and retaliation in California state court Friday, alleging she was threatened with legal action when she tried to speak up about the ill-treatment she suffered during taping, including racist slurs and having a knife brandished at her.

  • April 05, 2024

    Texas Appeals Court Reverses IT Consulting Worker Spat

    A Texas appeals court revived a suit brought by an information technology consulting company against its former worker, ruling that the company had shown enough evidence to go forward with the case and the trial court abused its discretion in granting a no-evidence summary judgment motion.

  • April 05, 2024

    NJ Smoking Law Violates Casino Workers' Rights, UAW Says

    A law preventing smoking in certain indoor workspaces violates New Jersey's Constitution by excluding casino workers, the United Auto Workers alleged Friday in a state court suit against the governor and state health department commissioner.

  • April 05, 2024

    Beverage Giant Sued Under Illinois Genetic Privacy Law

    Reyes Holdings, the largest beer distributor in the United States, has been sued in Illinois state court by a proposed class of job applicants who claim their genetic privacy rights were violated when they were required to submit to physical exams and inquiries about their family medical history as a condition of employment at the beverage distributor or its subsidiaries.

  • April 05, 2024

    Employment Authority: Gig Companies Go On Defense

    Law360 Employment Authority covers the biggest employment cases and trends. Catch up this week with coverage on what risks gig companies could face as they threaten to pull their apps from cities that add minimum wage requirements for gig workers, how employees' activities on social media are raising complex legal questions for employers, and why experts think federal law could preempt statutes passed by Southern states baring businesses that receive state economic incentives from voluntarily recognizing unions.

  • April 05, 2024

    11th Circ. Upholds College's Win In Student's Disability Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit on Thursday upheld Morehouse School of Medicine's win in a former student's suit claiming it failed to accommodate his disability by providing inadequate note-taking services, ruling that the Georgia federal court made no error in finding that the school had provided adequate accommodations.

  • April 05, 2024

    School District Seeks To Knock Out Teachers' Equal Pay Suit

    A school district asked a Pennsylvania federal judge Friday to toss or at least decertify a collective action alleging it paid male teachers more than women who had similar experience, arguing that the workers couldn't show they had enough in common to justify a group action.

  • April 05, 2024

    Contractor Settles Naturalized Citizen's Hiring Bias Claims

    A federal contractor settled claims that it slammed the brakes on hiring a naturalized citizen after finding out that she was not born in the U.S., the U.S. Department of Justice said.

  • April 05, 2024

    PAGA Repeal Bill On Nov. Ballot May Upend Calif. Labor Law

    A controversial bill going before Golden State voters in November has employment attorneys divided over its plan to replace California's Private Attorneys General Act with new legislation doubling penalties for willful labor-law violators, but leaving enforcement solely to a state agency that has proven ineffective in the past.

Expert Analysis

  • Employer Trial Tips For Fighting Worker PPE Pay Claims

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    Courts have struggled for decades to reach consensus on whether employees must be paid for time spent donning and doffing personal protective equipment, but this convoluted legal history points to practical trial strategies to help employers defeat these Fair Labor Standards Act claims, say Michael Mueller and Evangeline Paschal at Hunton.

  • Managing Competing Priorities In Witness Preparation

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    There’s often a divide between what attorneys and witnesses want out of the deposition process, but litigation teams can use several strategies to resolve this tension and help witnesses be more comfortable with the difficult conditions of testifying, say Ava Hernández and Steve Wood at Courtroom Sciences.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Assessing Merger Guideline Feedback With Machine Learning

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    Large language modeling appears to show that public sentiment matches agency intent around the new merger control guidelines from the Federal Trade Commission and U.S. Justice Department, says Andrew Sfekas at Cornerstone Research.

  • Understanding And Working With The Millennials On Your Jury

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    Every trial attorney will be facing a greater proportion of millennials on their jury, as they now comprise the largest generation in the U.S., and winning them over requires an understanding of their views on politics, corporations and damages, says Clint Townson at Townson Litigation Consulting.

  • Grant Compliance Takeaways From Ga. Tech's FCA Settlement

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    Georgia Tech’s recent False Claims Act settlement over its failure to detect compliance shortcomings in a grant program was unique in that it involved a voluntary repayment of funds prior to the resolution, offering a few key lessons for universities receiving research funding from the government, says Jonathan Porter at Husch Blackwell.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • Deferral Pointers For Employers After $700M Ohtani Deal

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    Darren Goodman and Christine Osvald-Mruz at Lowenstein Sandler examine the legal consequences of Shohei Ohtani's $700 million, 10-year contract with the Los Angeles Dodgers — a high-profile example of nonqualified deferred compensation — and offer lessons for employers of all sizes interested in similar deals.

  • Employer Lessons From Nixed Calif. Arbitration Agreement

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    A California state appeals court’s recent decision to throw out an otherwise valid arbitration agreement, where an employee claimed a confusing electronic signature system led her to agree to unfair terms, should alert employers to scrutinize any waivers or signing procedures that may appear to unconscionably favor the company, say Guillermo Tello and Monique Eginli at Clark Hill.

  • EEO-1 Ruling May Affect Other Gov't Agency Disclosures

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    By tightly construing a rarely litigated but frequently asserted term, a California federal court’s ruling that the Freedom of Information Act does not exempt reports to the U.S. Department of Labor on workplace demographics could expand the range of government contractor information susceptible to public disclosure, says John Zabriskie at Foley & Lardner.

  • Musk Pay Package Ruling Offers Detailed Lesson On Del. Law

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    Anat Alon-Beck and John Livingstone at Case Western Reserve University discuss the specifics that led Delaware's chancellor to rescind Elon Musk's $55.8 billion Tesla pay package on Jan. 30, how the state’s entire fairness doctrine played into the ruling, and its bigger-picture impact on the executive compensation landscape.

  • What's At Stake In High Court NLRB Injunction Case

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    William Baker at Wigdor examines the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision to hear Starbucks v. McKinney — where it will consider a long-standing circuit split over the standard for evaluating National Labor Relations Board injunction bids — and explains why the justices’ eventual decision, either way, is unlikely to be a significant blow to labor.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • The State Of Play In NIL, Compensation For Student-Athletes

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    Recent NCAA developments — including name, image, and likeness legislation and a governance and compensation proposal — reflect a shift from the initial hands-off approach to student-athletes' NIL deals and an effort to allow colleges to directly compensate student-athletes without categorizing them as employees, say attorneys at Pillsbury.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

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