Employment

  • February 16, 2024

    ADA Does Not Protect Medical Pot Use, Vt. Court Says

    A Vermont transit worker can't pursue a civil rights lawsuit against his employer who terminated him after he tested positive for marijuana, a Vermont federal judge has ruled, saying the Americans with Disabilities Act doesn't protect people with disabilities treated with medical marijuana.

  • February 16, 2024

    Swimmers Tell 9th Circ. New League Was Boycotted

    The International Swimming League and swimmers urged the Ninth Circuit on Friday to revive their certified class antitrust claims against the sport's international governing body over its alleged 2018 "boycott" of an ISL event, arguing the lower court erred in finding the organization's actions didn't constitute a boycott.

  • February 16, 2024

    Workday Deputy GC Wants Atty's Bias Suit Tossed

    A deputy general counsel for Workday urged a California federal court to dismiss her from a Black former subordinate's claims of harassment, retaliation and discrimination, arguing that the Maryland-based worker was improperly seeking the protection of California state laws.

  • February 16, 2024

    Union Can't Intervene In Fight Over NY Farm Laborers Law

    The United Farm Workers can't intervene in a case over a state law covering protections for agricultural workers, a New York federal judge ruled Friday, saying the union's interests in organizing and upholding the statute won't be harmed.

  • February 16, 2024

    Colo. Must Guard Against Unfair Bar Exam Asks, Official Says

    A high-ranking Colorado official on Friday told a state judge in Denver that the state lawyer licensing authority must deny accommodation requests from bar applicants who don't have proper documentation in order to avoid anyone getting an undue advantage on the exam.

  • February 16, 2024

    Uber Tells Court To Disregard Pa. AG's Brief In Wage Suit

    Uber urged a Pennsylvania federal court on Friday to disregard the state attorney general's amicus brief filed in a wage case that will decide whether UberBlack limo drivers are employees or independent contractors, saying the attorney general's involvement is superfluous.

  • February 16, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Deadlines, Delivery Drivers & Smog

    The U.S. Supreme Court will be closed Monday for Presidents Day and will begin a short oral argument week on Tuesday, during which the justices will consider the deadlines for challenging a federal agency's action and bringing copyright infringement claims.

  • February 16, 2024

    Judge Wary Of Boeing's Bid To Duck Birth Defect Suit

    A Washington state judge pressed Boeing on Friday to explain why it should get a "free pass" in a lawsuit over birth defects allegedly caused by factory workers' chemical exposure, questioning the aerospace giant's argument that it didn't have a duty to workers' future children based on foreseeable harm.

  • February 16, 2024

    Off The Bench: NHL Antitrust, Daily Fantasy Dread, ESPN Bet

    In this week's Off the Bench, the NHL faces allegations of a vast, exploitative antitrust scheme, daily fantasy operators continue facing heat from state regulators, and New York gets a new sports betting player as ESPN Bet hits the Empire State.

  • February 16, 2024

    Judge Says Athletes' Social Media Held 'Hostage' In NCAA Suit

    Former University of San Francisco baseball players cannot hold their social media messages "hostage" in a lawsuit that accuses the NCAA of enabling the sexual harassment they allegedly endured at the hands of two coaches, an Indiana magistrate judge ruled Thursday.

  • February 16, 2024

    Ex-Yellow Corp. Workers Push WARN Class Cert In Ch. 11

    Former employees of trucking firm Yellow Corp. told a Delaware bankruptcy court that recognizing them as a class is the best way to handle their claim that the bankrupt company didn't give them adequate warning of layoffs.

  • February 16, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    News broke last week that Delaware's Court of Chancery will say goodbye to its current longest-serving jurist, a development that quickly overshadowed a busy week of new merger and board disputes, fee rulings, settlements, and books-and-records demands.

  • February 16, 2024

    Fired Hospital Worker Can't Keep Fighting PTO Denial

    A maintenance worker who lost an administrative case alleging his ex-employer owed him money for unused paid time off when he was fired cannot try again to get a judgment in state court against the hospital where he worked or Michigan labor regulators, an appellate panel has found.

  • February 16, 2024

    NCAA, Hoopster Settle Dispute Over Betting Suspension

    The NCAA has settled a lawsuit brought by a Rutgers University basketball player who sued the organization earlier this month over claims it was trying to make him live out a punishment for sports betting violations that he had already served while a student-athlete at Iowa State University.

  • February 16, 2024

    Amazon Joins List Of Employers Challenging NLRB Structure

    Amazon has joined Trader Joe's, Starbucks and SpaceX in challenging the constitutionality of the National Labor Relations Board's structure, saying in a filing in board litigation that NLRB members and judges are unconstitutionally protected from removal by the U.S. president.

  • February 16, 2024

    DC Circ. Sends Ambulance Co. Info Spat Back To NLRB

    The D.C. Circuit on Friday vacated a National Labor Relations Board decision that found an ambulance company unlawfully withheld information from a union, telling the board to review the company's obligation to provide documents under the parties' labor contract.

  • February 16, 2024

    NY AG Tells Firm To Stop Misleading Uber, Lyft Drivers

    New York Attorney General Letitia James' office put a New York City law firm on notice Friday, warning in a cease-and-desist letter that the firm must immediately stop proffering unnecessary legal services to "help" Uber and Lyft drivers secure funds, for a fee, stemming from a November New York Labor Law settlement.

  • February 16, 2024

    Judge Trims Ex-CFO's Sex Bias Claims Against Anderson Kill

    A New York federal judge on Thursday trimmed sex bias claims from a former chief financial officer's disability discrimination lawsuit against insurance recovery law firm Anderson Kill PC, while denying the firm's request to disqualify the former executive's counsel.

  • February 16, 2024

    Trump Atty Didn't Go 'Rogue' In Pushing Club NDA, Court Told

    A former server suing a Trump Organization golf club over a nondisclosure agreement that she was allegedly illegally induced to sign by one of Donald Trump's lawyers has urged a New Jersey state court to keep her suit alive, arguing that the club's motion to dismiss relies on "absurd" arguments.

  • February 16, 2024

    Littler Hit With DQ Bid For Wielding Mistakenly Produced Doc

    Littler Mendelson PC has gained an "unfair advantage" and should be booted from defending a Florida pharmacy services company for using an inadvertently produced, privileged document in a deposition last week, a woman suing the company for whistleblower retaliation said.

  • February 16, 2024

    Former Worker Says Supercuts Owner Cut OT Rate Too Short

    A former worker is accusing the owner of about 400 Supercuts, Cost Cutters and Holiday Hair salons in seven states of shortchanging its hourly employees on their compensation by not accounting for commissions and other non-discretionary bonuses in their overtime rate calculations.

  • February 16, 2024

    GRSM50 Adds Employment Pro From San Diego Boutique

    Gordon Rees Scully Mansukhani LLP, now known as GRSM50, is bolstering its employment team, bringing in a Keeney Waite & Stevens APC business litigator as a partner in its San Diego office.

  • February 16, 2024

    Delivery Co. Denied Early Appeal In Mass. Wage Dispute

    A delivery company did not meet the standard for an immediate appeal of a ruling in favor of a group of drivers alleging they were misclassified as independent contractors, a Massachusetts federal judge ruled in denying the company's motion to appeal to the First Circuit.

  • February 15, 2024

    Kirkland Fights Uphill To Get Atty's Info From 2 BigLaw Firms

    A California federal magistrate judge appeared skeptical Thursday of Kirkland & Ellis' bid to subpoena confidential personnel information from a former IP associate's prior employers Paul Hastings LLP and Fish & Richardson PC in Kirkland's defense against her discrimination suit, telling counsel the requests seem overbroad and "at best marginally relevant."

  • February 15, 2024

    SpaceX Heads To Texas After Musk's Tesla Pay Package Axed

    Elon Musk announced Wednesday that he is taking SpaceX's business incorporation from Delaware to Texas, after Delaware's chancellor last month struck down his proposed $55 billion Tesla pay package.

Expert Analysis

  • Mitigating Compliance And Litigation Risks Of Evolving Tech

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    Amid artificial intelligence and other technological advances, companies must prepare for the associated risks, including a growing suite of privacy regulations, enterprising class action theories and consumer protection challenges, and proliferating disclosure obligations, say attorneys at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Calif. High Court Ruling Outlines Limits On PAGA Actions

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    While the California Supreme Court’s ruling last week in Estrada v. Royalty Carpet Mills held that courts cannot dismiss Private Attorneys General Act claims on manageability grounds, the opinion also details how claims can be narrowed, providing a road map for defendants facing complex actions, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • NY Pay Frequency Cases May Soon Be A Thing Of The Past

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    Two recent developments in New York state have unfurled to suggest that the high tide of frequency-of-pay lawsuits may soon recede, giving employers the upper hand when defending against threatened or pending claims, say attorneys at Reed Smith.

  • Trends That Will Shape The Construction Industry In 2024

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    Though the outlook for the construction industry is mixed, it is clear that 2024 will bring evolving changes aimed at building projects more safely and efficiently under difficult circumstances, and stakeholders would be wise to prepare for the challenges and opportunities these trends will bring, say Josephine Bahn and Jeffery Mullen at Cozen O'Connor.

  • A Focused Statement Can Ease Employment Mediation

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    Given the widespread use of mediation in employment cases, attorneys should take steps to craft mediation statements that efficiently assist the mediator by focusing on key issues, strengths and weaknesses of a claim, which can flag key disputes and barriers to a settlement, says Darren Rumack at Klein & Cardali.

  • How To Start Applying DOL's Independent Contractor Test

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    Last week, the U.S. Department of Labor finalized a worker classification rule that helpfully includes multiple factors that employers can leverage to systematically evaluate the economic realities of working relationships, says Elizabeth Arnold and Samantha Stelman at Berkeley Research Group.

  • 3 Areas Of Focus In Congressional Crosshairs This Year

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    Companies must prepare for Congress to build on its 2023 oversight priorities this year, continuing its vigorous inquiries into Chinese company-related investments, workplace safety and labor relations issues, and generative artificial intelligence, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Vaccine Accommodation Suits Show Risk Of Blanket Policies

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    A recent federal class action alleging Tyson Foods inappropriately applied a one-size-fits-all response to Arkansas employees seeking religious COVID-19 vaccine exemptions, with similar suits going back to 2022, should remind employers to individually consider every worker request for a religious accommodation, say Christopher Pardo and Elizabeth Sherwood at Hunton.

  • 5 Trade Secret Developments To Follow In 2024

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    Recent cases and trends in trade secret law indicate that significant developments are likely this year, and practitioners should be anticipating their impact on the business and legal landscape, say attorneys at Faegre Drinker.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

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    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

  • Why CFTC Whistleblowers Are Crucial To Crypto Regulation

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    The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission's whistleblower program has proven to be a key tool in the U.S.' efforts to police cryptocurrency, but a funding issue shows that it has become a victim of its own success, says Stephen Kohn at Kohn Kohn.

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