Employment

  • April 24, 2024

    NC Biz Court Trims School Food Servicer's Noncompete Suit

    The North Carolina Business Court on Wednesday pared a cafeteria food provider's lawsuit alleging a former sales director absconded with confidential information to a rival business, reasoning the Tar Heel State's laws aren't applicable over alleged out-of-state conduct.

  • April 24, 2024

    Takeaways From The FTC's Noncompetes Ban

    The first legal challenges to the Federal Trade Commission's new ban on essentially all noncompete agreements that employers impose on workers have already been filed, but questions remain, not just on the rule's legal viability, but also on the likelihood of follow-on rulemakings and the rule's exact reach.

  • April 24, 2024

    MLB Fired Ump For Reporting Sex Harassment, Suit Says

    Major League Baseball fired a minor league umpire who accused a female colleague of bullying him and using homophobic slurs to avoid disrupting its goal of recruiting more women to work for the league, according to a complaint filed Wednesday in New York federal court.

  • April 24, 2024

    Pepsi Can't Use Workers' Comp Immunity In Fla. Shooting Suit

    Florida's Third District Court of Appeal on Wednesday ruled that a Pepsi subsidiary can't utilize a workers' compensation immunity defense in a lawsuit brought by a former employee who was shot by a co-worker, saying the company took inconsistent positions on his claim for benefits.

  • April 24, 2024

    Customer Service Reps Say DTE Energy Owes Log-In Pay

    Michigan's largest energy company pressured its customer service employees into performing between seven and 18 minutes' worth of unpaid off-the-clock tasks per shift, two former employees have said in a new federal lawsuit accusing DTE Energy of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act.

  • April 24, 2024

    Panel Reinstates Suit Over Hospital Workers' COVID Deaths

    A New Jersey appellate panel on Wednesday reinstated a suit seeking to hold two hospitals liable for the COVID-19 deaths of a hospital aide and a nurse during the early stages of the pandemic, saying the trial judge made improper findings of fact regarding allegedly reckless conduct.

  • April 24, 2024

    World Cup Workers' Abuse Suit Still Falls Short, US Cos. Say

    A Texas engineering company and a Colorado subsidiary have asked a federal court to dismiss claims from Filipino workers alleging they were subjected to inhumane labor conditions when helping construct stadiums for the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar, arguing the workers' latest attempt doesn't even show the defendants recruited or hired them.

  • April 24, 2024

    DOL Says Firm 'Repeatedly' Misclassified Highway Workers

    The U.S. Department of Labor recently determined that a subcontractor "repeatedly misclassified" employees who worked on 25 federal highway construction projects in Pennsylvania, according to a notice filed in Pennsylvania federal court Wednesday in a lawsuit against three construction firms.

  • April 24, 2024

    Filipino Workers' $730K Trafficking Deal Gets Judge's Initial OK

    An Oklahoma federal court preliminarily approved a $730,000 settlement on Wednesday that would resolve Filipino workers' claims that a local couple tricked them into paying steep immigration and recruitment fees to come work for them in the U.S.

  • April 24, 2024

    9th Circ. Says NLRB Can Enforce Starbucks Bargaining Order

    The Ninth Circuit said Wednesday that Starbucks must recognize its Seattle roastery workers' April 2022 vote to unionize, overruling the coffee giant's contention that ballots should have been cast in person and concluding a National Labor Relations Board manager had discretion to call the mail-in election because of COVID-19 case counts at the time.

  • April 24, 2024

    SpaceX Stalling Case's Launch To Calif., NLRB Says

    The National Labor Relations Board told a Texas federal judge it should disregard SpaceX's "last ditch" effort to keep a case challenging the employment agency's constitutionality in the Lone Star State, arguing that the rocket company is revisiting arguments the court already decided.

  • April 24, 2024

    UPMC Affiliate Can't Avoid False Claims Suit Over NIH Grant

    A research foundation affiliated with a University of Pittsburgh Medical Center hospital can't duck a former employee's claims that the foundation mishandled grant money and fired her for raising concerns, though UPMC itself is off the hook, a federal judge ruled Wednesday.

  • April 24, 2024

    McKesson Ends Ex-Sales VP's Title VII Suit Over Vax Refusal

    McKesson Corp. reached an agreement with a former sales vice president to end her lawsuit accusing the drug distributor of firing her because her Christian beliefs barred her from getting the COVID-19 vaccine, according to a filing in North Carolina federal court.

  • April 24, 2024

    Foxtrot, Dom's Kitchen Closures Violate WARN Act, Suit Says

    Former employees of Foxtrot Market and Dom's Kitchen & Market hit the stores' parent company with a lawsuit in Illinois federal court Thursday, alleging it failed to give workers 60 days' notice of mass layoffs as required by federal law when all 33 locations abruptly shuttered Tuesday.

  • April 24, 2024

    Raleigh, NC, Seeks Dismissal Of Ex-Cop's OT Suit

    The city of Raleigh, North Carolina, asked a federal judge Wednesday to toss an ex-police officer's lawsuit alleging it illegally compelled officers to accept time off rather than pay overtime premiums, arguing it acted in accordance with federal labor law.

  • April 24, 2024

    Louis Vuitton Flouted Wage And Hour Laws, Suit Says

    Louis Vuitton has been hit with a proposed wage and hour class action in Los Angeles Superior Court by a former employee, alleging the luxury fashion company failed to pay overtime, provide proper meal and break periods and manipulated time cards to show fewer hours than worked during the pay period.

  • April 24, 2024

    Sanction Bank Workers Who Hid IP Grab, Branding Firm Says

    An architectural and marketing firm has asked a Philadelphia federal judge for sanctions against two of its former employees who jumped ship for Republic Bank, saying that texts between the ex-employees show the "nadir of bad faith" about evidence destruction in their trade secrets misappropriation suit.

  • April 24, 2024

    Solar Co. Must Pay Workers, Union Benefit Funds

    A Kalamazoo, Michigan-based solar company must follow an arbitration board's order to remit unpaid wages to two workers and unpaid contributions to a group of union benefit funds, a Michigan federal judge ruled Wednesday.

  • April 24, 2024

    Chamber Of Commerce Sues FTC Over New Noncompete Rule

    The U.S. Chamber of Commerce has lodged a promised lawsuit challenging the Federal Trade Commission's new rule banning noncompete agreements, contending the pacts are good for the economy and that the agency lacks authority to issue the regulation.

  • April 24, 2024

    Reggie Bush Scores Heisman Back After Nearly 15 Years

    Nearly 15 years after being stripped of his records and awards, former University of Southern California running back and football legend Reggie Bush is getting his 2005 Heisman Trophy back, with the Heisman Trophy Trust citing "enormous changes" in the college football environment.

  • April 24, 2024

    3rd Circ. Won't Let Keystone Coal Escape Black Lung Payout

    The Third Circuit on Wednesday denied Keystone Coal Mining Corp.'s request to revoke benefits awarded to a miner with pneumoconiosis under the Black Lung Benefits Act, rejecting its argument that the administrative law judge hearing the case did not properly consider all the evidence.

  • April 24, 2024

    Ivy League Says Unionization Could 'Threaten' College Sports

    Ivy League schools may eliminate certain varsity sports if college athletes can unionize, the Ivy League athletic conference has told the National Labor Relations Board, urging the board to reverse a precedent-setting decision that allowed Dartmouth College's men's basketball team to unionize.

  • April 24, 2024

    4th Circ. Revives Worker's Age Bias Suit Against IT Co.

    The Fourth Circuit on Wednesday reinstated a former information technology company worker's lawsuit alleging she was unlawfully fired and replaced by someone nearly 30 years her junior, saying a trial court held her to too high a standard when it threw out her case.

  • April 24, 2024

    Tesla Must Put Musk's Potential Payday In Trust, Investors Say

    Class attorneys for Tesla stockholders have asked Delaware's chancellor to seize or shelter in a trust tens of billions in company stock sidelined by a ruling that struck down CEO Elon Musk's 10-year compensation plan in January, pending a fast-track hearing.

  • April 24, 2024

    Solar Panel Co. Loses Calif. Appeal Over PAGA Arbitration

    A California appellate panel sided with a lower court as it ruled in a published opinion that a carveout in a home solar panel company's employment agreement did not require a former worker to arbitrate his individual Private Attorneys General Act claims, keeping his suit in court.

Expert Analysis

  • FTC Noncompete Ban Signals Rising Labor Focus In Antitrust

    Author Photo

    The Federal Trade Commission’s approval this week of a prohibition on noncompete agreements continues antitrust enforcers’ increasing focus on labor, meaning companies must keep employee issues top of mind both in the ordinary course of business and when pursuing transactions, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Breaking Down EEOC's Final Rule To Implement The PWFA

    Author Photo

    Attorneys at Littler highlight some of the key provisions of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's final rule and interpretive guidance implementing the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act, which is expected to be effective June 18, and departures from the proposed rule issued in August 2023.

  • 4 Ways To Refresh Your Law Firm's Marketing Strategy

    Author Photo

    With many BigLaw firms relying on an increasingly obsolete marketing approach that prioritizes stiff professionalism over authentic connection, adopting a few key communications strategies to better connect with today's clients and prospects can make all the difference, say Eric Pacifici and Kevin Henderson at SMB Law.

  • How To Prepare As Employee Data Reporting Deadlines Near

    Author Photo

    As filing deadlines approach, government contractors and private companies alike should familiarize themselves with recent changes to federal and California employee data reporting requirements and think strategically about registration of affirmative action plans to minimize the risk of being audited, say Christopher Durham and Zev Grumet-Morris at Duane Morris.

  • Address Complainants Before They Become Whistleblowers

    Author Photo

    A New York federal court's dismissal of a whistleblower retaliation claim against HSBC Securities last month indicates that ignored complaints to management combined with financial incentives from regulators create the perfect conditions for a concerned and disgruntled employee to make the jump to federal whistleblower, say attorneys at Cooley.

  • The Practical Effects Of Justices' Arbitration Exemption Ruling

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Bissonnette v. LePage Bakeries, that a transportation worker need not work in the transportation industry to be exempt from the Federal Arbitration Act, may negatively affect employers' efforts to mitigate class action risk via arbitration agreement enforcement, say Charles Schoenwetter and Eric Olson at Bowman and Brooke.

  • Highlights From The 2024 ABA Antitrust Spring Meeting

    Author Photo

    U.S. merger enforcement and cartels figured heavily in this year's American Bar Association spring antitrust meeting, where one key takeaway included news that the Federal Trade Commission's anticipated changes to the Hart-Scott-Rodino form may be less dramatic than many originally feared, say attorneys at Freshfields.

  • Why Corporate DEI Challenges Increasingly Cite Section 1981

    Author Photo

    As legal challenges to corporate diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives increase in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on race-conscious college admissions last year, Section 1981 of the Civil Rights Act is supplanting Title VII as conservative activist groups' weapon of choice, say Mike Delikat and Tierra Piens at Orrick.

  • The Future Of BIPA Insurance Litigation After Visual Pak

    Author Photo

    A recent Illinois appellate court decision, National Fire Insurance v. Visual Pak, may have altered the future of insurance litigation under the state's Biometric Information Privacy Act by diametrically opposing a prominent Seventh Circuit ruling that found insurance coverage for violations of the act, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Inside OMB's Update On Race And Ethnicity Data Collection

    Author Photo

    The Office of Management and Budget's new guidelines for agency collection of data on race and ethnicity reflect societal changes and the concerns of certain demographics, but implementation may be significantly burdensome for agencies and employers, say Joanna Colosimo and Bill Osterndorf at DCI Consulting.

  • Assessing Work Rules After NLRB Handbook Ruling

    Author Photo

    The National Labor Relations Board's Stericycle decision last year sparked uncertainty surrounding whether historically acceptable work rules remain lawful — but employers can use a two-step analysis to assess whether to implement a given rule and how to do so in a compliant manner, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

  • Series

    Whitewater Kayaking Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Whether it's seeing clients and their issues from a new perspective, or staying nimble in a moment of intense challenge, the lessons learned from whitewater kayaking transcend the rapids of a river and prepare attorneys for the courtroom and beyond, says Matthew Kent at Alston & Bird.

  • New Wash. Laws Employers Should Pay Attention To

    Author Photo

    The Washington Legislature ended its session last month after passing substantial laws that should prompt employers to spring into action — including a broadened equal pay law to cover classes beyond gender, narrowed sick leave payment requirements for construction workers and protections for grocery workers after a merger, say Hannah Ard and Alayna Piwonski at Lane Powell.

  • Cannabis Ruling Lights Path For Bankruptcy Protection

    Author Photo

    A recent Massachusetts bankruptcy appellate court ruling in Blumsack v. Harrington leaves the door open for those employed in the cannabis industry to seek bankruptcy relief where certain conditions are met, but rescheduling marijuana as a Schedule III drug may complicate matters, say Jane Haviland and Kathryn Droumbakis at Mintz.

  • This Earth Day, Consider How Your Firm Can Go Greener

    Author Photo

    As Earth Day approaches, law firms and attorneys should consider adopting more sustainable practices to reduce their carbon footprint — from minimizing single-use plastics to purchasing carbon offsets for air travel — which ultimately can also reduce costs for clients, say M’Lynn Phillips and Lisa Walters at IMS Legal Strategies.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!