Environmental

  • February 15, 2024

    Enviro Orgs Sue EPA Over PFAS Data For Plastic Containers

    Two environmental groups accused the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday of withholding test data on the presence of forever chemicals in fluorinated plastic containers in response to their Freedom of Information Act request.

  • February 15, 2024

    FERC Churn Won't Impact Grid Policy Push, Chair Says

    A looming commissioner departure that could leave the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission without enough members to fully function is not affecting efforts to finalize a long-awaited overhaul of the agency's electric transmission planning policies, Chair Willie Phillips said Thursday.

  • February 15, 2024

    Conn. Justice Calls Marriott Lien Fight 'An Embarrassment'

    A "bizarre" appeal that seeks the discharge of a sewer assessment lien on a Marriott hotel property is "a waste of everybody's time," a Connecticut Supreme Court justice said Thursday amid oral argument.

  • February 15, 2024

    DOI Inks Klamath Basin Agreement With Tribes, Water Users

    The U.S. Department of the Interior said it has struck an agreement that will see water users and tribes work together in a push to improve the environment and water supplies in the drought-prone Klamath River Basin of southern Oregon and northern California, pledging $72 million for projects.

  • February 15, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Says Feds Didn't Coerce Mont. Coal Permit Denial

    The Federal Circuit on Thursday said the Court of Federal Claims correctly threw out a coal leaser's suit alleging the federal government prevented it from acquiring necessary state operating permits, saying the company has failed to establish Montana was coerced into denying the permits.

  • February 15, 2024

    Stanford Prof Must Pay Atty Fees In Dropped Defamation Suit

    A Stanford University professor who sued critics of his renewable energy research must pay more than $500,000 in attorney fees despite dropping the litigation, the D.C. Court of Appeals ruled Thursday.

  • February 15, 2024

    Petition Watch: Classes, Litigation Changes & Fraud Theories

    The U.S. Supreme Court receives thousands of petitions for review each term, but only a few make the news. Here, Law360 looks at four petitions filed in the past three weeks that you might've missed, including questions over how courts should analyze class certification bids and regulations restricting specific speech for content-neutral reasons, whether plaintiffs must reestablish standing after amending lawsuits, and what constitutes fraud.

  • February 15, 2024

    Wash. Judge Says Tribes Can Seek River Pollution Damages

    A Washington federal judge denied a Teck Resources Ltd. unit's bid for summary judgment on natural resource damages claims that the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation and state of Washington lodged over decades of Upper Columbia River pollution from a smelter in Trail, British Columbia, setting up the matter for a possible trial.

  • February 15, 2024

    Pearl Harbor Cleanup Needs Fuller Accounting, Watchdog Says

    Cleaning pollution from fuel spills near the U.S. Navy base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, could take decades, but the U.S. Department of Defense's reports to Congress only include cost estimates through this year, making planning difficult, a government watchdog has warned.

  • February 14, 2024

    EPA Says Farmers Can Still Use Existing Stocks Of Dicamba

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued an order Wednesday that allows farmers to use the weed killer dicamba if it was already packaged and ready to go before an Arizona federal judge revoked the EPA's approval of the popular herbicide last week.

  • February 14, 2024

    USDA Says $20M Will Help Tribes Access Climate Market

    Federally recognized tribes and Alaska Native corporations and villages are getting a $20 million bump to broaden their access to emerging climate markets as a way to address ongoing climate change, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said on Wednesday.

  • February 14, 2024

    9th Circ. Skeptical Of Basis For LA's Pollution Coverage Args

    The Ninth Circuit appeared reluctant Wednesday to revive the City of Los Angeles' bid for environmental contamination coverage from a defunct boat repair company's insurers, probing the city's counsel on whether his arguments for coverage were at odds with the underlying factual record.

  • February 14, 2024

    'Post Hoc' Args Doom Army Defense Of $11.5M Enviro Fix Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has sustained a Florida construction company's protest of an $11.5 million environmental remediation services deal for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, backing the company's claim the agency made unreasonable adjustments to its proposed cost.

  • February 14, 2024

    NJ Town Looks To Stay 'Historic' $393M PFAS Settlement

    A New Jersey town is looking to pause the final approval of a proposed $393 million settlement between the Garden State and the American arm of Belgian chemical company Solvay over "forever chemical" contamination, arguing the state and its outside counsel have ignored the law in order to settle quickly.

  • February 14, 2024

    Enviro Orgs Planning EPA Suit Over Phosphate-Mining Waste

    A coalition of conservation, public health and environmental justice groups told the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency they plan to sue it for failing to respond to a 3-year-old petition asking for stronger regulations governing toxic and radioactive phosphogypsum waste generated by the fertilizer industry.

  • February 14, 2024

    Defunct Nuke Plant Mishandled Asbestos, Mass. AG Says

    Asbestos-containing demolition debris from the decommissioning of the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station in Massachusetts was repeatedly mishandled, including being transported in open-top dumpsters to an unapproved metal recycling facility, the state's attorney general alleged Wednesday in a civil complaint against the plant's current owner.

  • February 14, 2024

    Feds, Power Line Developer Decry Tribes' Suit As 'Too Late'

    The federal government and SunZia Transmission LLC, the developer of a 550-mile power line, urged an Arizona federal judge Tuesday to deny a request from tribes and conservations groups for a preliminary injunction halting the project's construction, saying they waited too long to make their challenge.

  • February 14, 2024

    NJ Mayor Gets Voice In NY Congestion Pricing Fight

    A New Jersey mayor who recently failed to get his lawsuit over New York's congestion pricing plan merged with another case brought by the Garden State government will be allowed to participate in oral arguments against the Empire State, a federal judge has decided.

  • February 14, 2024

    Glancy Prongay To Lead Wood Pellet Co. Dividend Suit

    Glancy Prongay & Murray LLP has been appointed lead counsel in an investor suit alleging wood pellet manufacturer Enviva misled investors about the financial health of the company and its ability to pay dividends.

  • February 14, 2024

    10th Circ. Revives Suit Accusing Valero Of Okla. Pipeline Leak

    The Tenth Circuit has partially revived an Oklahoma cattle ranch's lawsuit against Valero Energy Corp. alleging a pipeline leak contaminated its property, saying an Oklahoma federal judge misinterpreted state law when he tossed the ranch's nuisance and negligence claims.

  • February 14, 2024

    Mass. Court Doubts Northeastern Vowed To Keep Land Public

    Massachusetts Appeals Court justices appeared Wednesday to question a claim by the town of Nahant and a group of residents that Northeastern University had implicitly dedicated oceanfront land it acquired in the 1960s as a wildlife preserve and park by allowing public access for decades.

  • February 14, 2024

    Husch Blackwell Adds Ex-Perkins Coie Energy Co-Chair

    Husch Blackwell LLP has added the former co-chair of Perkins Coie LLP's nationwide energy industry group and another energy regulatory and environmental attorney from that firm as partners in its Madison, Wisconsin, office, it announced Wednesday.

  • February 14, 2024

    Shareholders Seek Approval For $7.5M Faraday Future Deal

    Faraday Future Intelligent Electric Inc. investors are asking a California federal judge to certify a settlement class and approve a $7.5 million deal to resolve their claims that the company misled them about its electric vehicle reservations and financial prospects before a go-public special-purpose acquisition company merger.

  • February 13, 2024

    Fluoride Can Harm Brain, EPA Scientist Says As Trial Wraps

    The government wrapped its defense Tuesday in a California federal bench trial over environmental groups' efforts to ban fluoride in America's drinking water, with the government's final witness acknowledging under cross-examination that fluoride is capable of causing "neurodevelopmental harm."

  • February 13, 2024

    Attys Must Reveal Possible Tie To 'Disturbing' Flint PR Move

    A Michigan federal judge on Tuesday tore into attorneys for a water engineering firm being sued for its alleged role in the Flint water crisis, warning them of severe repercussions if they are found to be involved in a campaign to disparage opposing counsel.

Expert Analysis

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • The Competing Goals Of Environmental And Bankruptcy Laws

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    Recent economic pressures combined with environmental liabilities have led to some of the largest bankruptcy filings in U.S. history, meaning debtors and creditors should be aware of the challenges, conflicts and uncertainties that arise at the intersection of these two legal fields, say Andrew Gallo and Duke McCall at Morgan Lewis.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Canada

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    In Canada, multiple statutes, regulations, common law and industry guidance address environmental, social and governance considerations, with debate over ESG in the business realm potentially growing on the horizon, say attorneys at Blakes.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Opinion

    Farm Bill Gives Congress 2024's Biggest Enviro Opportunity

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    A new Farm Bill, which Congress hopes to get out before mid-2024, is the main legislative opportunity to accelerate the adoption of environmentally friendly practices, as the major environmental laws have been interpreted largely to exempt agriculture from pollution standards that other industries must meet, say Peter Lehner and Carrie Apfel at Earthjustice.

  • What To Expect From High Court In Corp. Disclosure Case

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    Oral argument in Macquarie v. Moab Partners — a case with the potential to significantly alter corporate disclosures and private securities litigation liability — suggests that the U.S. Supreme Court is focused on answering the narrow question presented, say Elizabeth Gingold Clark and Madeleine Juszynski Davidson at Alston & Bird.

  • After Watershed Year, Clean Hydrogen Faces New Challenges

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    Clean hydrogen is on the verge of taking off — but over the course of 2023, it became clear that the regulatory landscape will be more stringent than expected, and the cost and timing of major projects will depend on a number of key developments anticipated in 2024, say attorneys at Weil.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

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    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

  • Time To Step Up PFAS Due Diligence In Cross-Border M&A

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    Regulations in the U.S. and EU governing per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances will likely evolve to become global standards out of necessity and scale, so PFAS due diligence — particularly for buyers, sellers, and lenders and investors involved in multijurisdictional mergers and acquisitions — will be essential in 2024, say attorneys at Shipman & Goodwin.

  • Series

    NY Banking Brief: All The Notable Legal Updates In Q4

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    New York's banking and financial sector saw a number of notable regulatory and legislative changes in the final quarter of 2023, including guidance on climate risks and heightened cybersecurity protocols issued by the New York State Department of Financial Services, as well as final revisions to virtual currency listings in the state, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • 3 Significant Ohio Insurance Updates From 2023

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    The past year saw some significant changes and developments in Ohio's insurance coverage landscape, from new bad faith discovery mechanisms relating to out-of-state property to the Ohio Supreme Court's interpretation of what constitutes an assault or battery for coverage purposes, say Jenna Pletcher and William Peseski at Brouse McDowell. 

  • 7 E-Discovery Predictions For 2024 And Beyond

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    The legal and technical issues of e-discovery now affect virtually every lawsuit, and in the year to come, practitioners can expect practices and policies to evolve in a number of ways, from the expanded use of relevancy redactions to mandated information security provisions in protective orders, say attorneys at Littler.

  • Securities Class Actions Show No Signs of Slowing In 2024

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    Plaintiffs asserted securities class actions at elevated levels in 2023 — a sign that filings will remain high in the year ahead — as they switched gears to target companies that allegedly have failed to anticipate supply chain disruptions, persistent inflation, rising interest rates and other macroeconomic headwinds, say attorneys at Skadden.

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