Food & Beverage

  • February 16, 2024

    Oat Milk Co. Settles Greenwashing Investor Suit For $9.25M

    Investors suing Swedish alternative milk manufacturer Oatly asked a New York federal judge Friday to preliminarily approve a $9.25 million deal to settle claims that the company pitched its business as more environmentally friendly than it is.

  • February 16, 2024

    The Congressman Who Reps Cannabis Reform On Capitol Hill

    Rep. Earl Blumenauer speaks to Law360 about the prospects for Congress enacting marijuana reform, why he supports moving cannabis to Schedule III and some of the drug policy triumphs and setbacks in his home state of Oregon.

  • February 16, 2024

    Union Can't Intervene In Fight Over NY Farm Laborers Law

    The United Farm Workers can't intervene in a case over a state law covering protections for agricultural workers, a New York federal judge ruled Friday, saying the union's interests in organizing and upholding the statute won't be harmed.

  • February 16, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Deadlines, Delivery Drivers & Smog

    The U.S. Supreme Court will be closed Monday for Presidents Day and will begin a short oral argument week on Tuesday, during which the justices will consider the deadlines for challenging a federal agency's action and bringing copyright infringement claims.

  • February 16, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    News broke last week that Delaware's Court of Chancery will say goodbye to its current longest-serving jurist, a development that quickly overshadowed a busy week of new merger and board disputes, fee rulings, settlements, and books-and-records demands.

  • February 16, 2024

    Gov't Wants More Alaskan Native Reps On Subsistence Board

    The U.S. government has plans to strengthen Alaskan Native tribal representation on its Federal Subsistence Board, saying the U.S. Department of the Interior and the U.S. Department of Agriculture have proposed a new rule to add board members with personal experience of subsistence living in rural Alaska.

  • February 16, 2024

    Feds Tell 1st Circ. Mass. Wind Farm Approval Was Sound

    The federal government has said a Massachusetts federal judge properly dumped a challenge lodged by commercial fishing groups seeking to upend federal approvals of the Vineyard Wind project, telling the First Circuit that the record shows federal agencies thoroughly studied the project's potential impacts.

  • February 16, 2024

    Fruit Grower Gets OK For $11M DIP Draw After Lender Deal

    Bankrupt fruit producer Prima Wawona received interim approval Friday for an $11 million draw on its $22 million in Chapter 11 financing after saying it had reached a deal with objecting lenders on the financing and was working on a deal for its overall bankruptcy plan.

  • February 16, 2024

    Greenberg Traurig Adds FDA Expert From Emord & Associates

    Greenberg Traurig LLP has hired a shareholder in Phoenix who spent over 16 years with boutique Emord & Associates PC to continue his practice counseling businesses regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on a range of compliance matters, the firm announced Thursday.

  • February 15, 2024

    Humane Society's Poultry Slaughter Suit May Need An Update

    A California federal magistrate judge on Thursday told the Humane Society and other nonprofits suing the U.S. Department of Agriculture for waiving limits on the pace of poultry slaughtering that they may need to file an amended complaint due to new regulations implemented since the suit was filed.

  • February 15, 2024

    Enviro Orgs Sue EPA Over PFAS Data For Plastic Containers

    Two environmental groups accused the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday of withholding test data on the presence of forever chemicals in fluorinated plastic containers in response to their Freedom of Information Act request.

  • February 15, 2024

    Restaurant Franchise Owner Hit With $30.7M Jury Verdict

    A Dallas County, Texas, jury has returned a $30.7 million verdict against major restaurant franchise company Sun Holdings Inc. and its owner in favor of an executive who claimed they refused to pay him his fair share of profits for operating nearly 150 Popeyes eateries.

  • February 15, 2024

    Wash. Nonprofit Owes $250K For Produce, Suit Says

    A Washington state-based produce company alleged in a federal court complaint this week that a nonprofit has failed to pay it $250,000 for shipments of fresh fruit and vegetables despite receiving funds from a state program that helps provide emergency food for people experiencing hunger.

  • February 15, 2024

    Gerber, Others Fight Bid For MDL On Baby Food Heavy Metals

    A group of baby food manufacturers, including Gerber Products Co., The Hain Celestial Group Inc. and Beech-Nut Nutrition Co., is urging the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation not to consolidate suits alleging that heavy metals in their products cause autism spectrum disorder and other conditions, saying there's no benefit to grouping them in an MDL.

  • February 15, 2024

    Shoppers Say Albertsons-Kroger Suit Shortcomings Fixed

    Consumers challenging Kroger's $24.6 billion bid for Albertsons defended their revised lawsuit in California federal court against the supermarkets' latest dismissal bid, arguing their tweaked complaint now adequately identifies the affected stores and lays out how the deal threatens competition.

  • February 15, 2024

    Damaged Champagne Cargo Row Can Proceed, Judge Says

    A New Jersey federal judge preserved the majority of a $930,000 coverage dispute over a damaged champagne shipment Thursday, denying a logistics company's bid for dismissal while giving an insurer the opportunity to put forth an alternate pleading.

  • February 15, 2024

    Club, Insurer Resolve Fiduciary Breach Coverage Row

    A country club owner, various club board members and Selective Insurance Co. agreed to dismiss their dispute Thursday in Massachusetts federal court over coverage for breach of contract and fiduciary duty claims that club investors lodged in arbitration, resolving the coverage case after reaching a settlement in January.

  • February 15, 2024

    Instant Brands May Have Rights Against Supplier, Judge Says

    A Texas bankruptcy judge issued a tentative ruling that could favor appliance and housewares maker Instant Brands in its dispute with a supplier objecting to the Chapter 11 plan's treatment of indemnification claims.

  • February 15, 2024

    Marketing Co. Asks Justices To Hear 'Impossible' TM Row

    Illinois-based marketing consulting firm Impossible X LLC has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review a decision from a divided Ninth Circuit that revived plant-based burger maker Impossible Foods Inc.'s trademark lawsuit against it.

  • February 15, 2024

    No Coverage For Pandemic Losses, NY Top Court Rules

    A Texas-based restaurant operator isn't entitled to insurance coverage for its pandemic losses, New York's top court ruled Thursday, saying the operator didn't allege the kind of physical loss or damage required for coverage.

  • February 15, 2024

    AGs Press FDA On Safeguards Against Metal In Baby Food

    Attorneys general from states across the country urged the U.S. Food and Drug Administration once again on Thursday to establish requirements that baby food producers test for lead and other metals in products headed for store shelves, citing a recent wave of childhood lead poisoning connected to recalled applesauce pouches.  

  • February 15, 2024

    What Rescheduling Pot Would Mean For Criminal Justice Reform

    While federal drug enforcers mull a recommendation from health regulators to loosen restrictions on marijuana, criminal justice reformers are warning that rescheduling the drug would not realize President Joe Biden's campaign promise to decriminalize marijuana.

  • February 15, 2024

    Vaughan Baio Adds 3 Partners And 2 Offices In NY, NJ

    Philadelphia-based midsized firm Vaughan Baio & Partners expanded its footprint and resources this month with the addition of three partners and the opening of two offices in New York and New Jersey.

  • February 15, 2024

    Deals Rumor Mill: Sony-Michael Jackson, Inspire IPO, Walmart

    Sony plans to acquire half of Michael Jackson's catalog; private equity firm Roark Capital is planning to list Inspire Brands, which owns Dunkin' and other food chains; and Walmart is pursuing an acquisition of TV maker Vizio. Here, Law360 breaks down these and other notable deal rumors from the past week.

  • February 14, 2024

    'Stupid' To Grant Baby Food Mass Tort Fees Now, Judge Says

    A California judge said Wednesday that he thinks it is "stupid" to grant food companies, including Walmart, more than $600,000 in legal costs following their win in a lawsuit alleging a child's autism was caused by heavy metals in baby food, but it is unclear what the law requires.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Canada

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    In Canada, multiple statutes, regulations, common law and industry guidance address environmental, social and governance considerations, with debate over ESG in the business realm potentially growing on the horizon, say attorneys at Blakes.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Opinion

    Farm Bill Gives Congress 2024's Biggest Enviro Opportunity

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    A new Farm Bill, which Congress hopes to get out before mid-2024, is the main legislative opportunity to accelerate the adoption of environmentally friendly practices, as the major environmental laws have been interpreted largely to exempt agriculture from pollution standards that other industries must meet, say Peter Lehner and Carrie Apfel at Earthjustice.

  • Vaccine Accommodation Suits Show Risk Of Blanket Policies

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    A recent federal class action alleging Tyson Foods inappropriately applied a one-size-fits-all response to Arkansas employees seeking religious COVID-19 vaccine exemptions, with similar suits going back to 2022, should remind employers to individually consider every worker request for a religious accommodation, say Christopher Pardo and Elizabeth Sherwood at Hunton.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • 3 Key Class Action Trends To Use As Guidance In 2024

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    Telephone Consumer Protection Act, privacy and false advertising class actions saw significant shifts last year — including a trend toward expanding the application of preexisting laws to current technologies — that businesses should keep in mind to navigate the class action landscape in 2024, say attorneys at Mintz.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

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    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

  • Time To Step Up PFAS Due Diligence In Cross-Border M&A

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    Regulations in the U.S. and EU governing per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances will likely evolve to become global standards out of necessity and scale, so PFAS due diligence — particularly for buyers, sellers, and lenders and investors involved in multijurisdictional mergers and acquisitions — will be essential in 2024, say attorneys at Shipman & Goodwin.

  • How 4 State AGs Are Shaping Data Privacy Compliance

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    As the landscape of state data privacy laws continues to grow across the nation, understanding how state attorneys general — such as in California, Colorado, Connecticut and Virginia — are thinking about these laws is critical to begin forecasting how enforcement will play out, say Michelle Kallen and Daniel Echeverri at Jenner & Block.

  • 7 E-Discovery Predictions For 2024 And Beyond

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    The legal and technical issues of e-discovery now affect virtually every lawsuit, and in the year to come, practitioners can expect practices and policies to evolve in a number of ways, from the expanded use of relevancy redactions to mandated information security provisions in protective orders, say attorneys at Littler.

  • 4 International Arbitration Trends To Monitor In 2024

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    Global growth slowed substantially in 2023, and may continue into 2024 due to geopolitical instability, which could fuel four key trends in international arbitration in the coming year, including investor-state and commercial arbitration, an increase in arbitration out of China, and more, say Gregory Litt and Sharmistha Chakrabarti at Skadden.

  • 5 Litigation Funding Trends To Note In 2024

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    Over the next year and beyond, litigation funding will continue to evolve in ways that affect attorneys and the larger litigation landscape, from the growth of a secondary market for funded claims, to rising interest rates restricting the availability of capital, says Jeffery Lula at GLS Capital.

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