Food & Beverage

  • February 08, 2024

    High Court Ruling Solidifies SOX Whistleblower Protections

    The U.S. Supreme Court's unanimous decision Thursday in favor of a UBS whistleblower has solidified whistleblower protections across a wide range of industries, with one attorney saying the ruling has made the Sarbanes-Oxley Act the most pro-employee labor law in the country.

  • February 08, 2024

    Ex-CEO Can't Pursue Interference Claim Against Wyo. Biotech

    Holding that a manager of a flavoring and aromas biotech company cannot tortiously interfere with a contract between the company and its former CEO, a Connecticut state court has clipped a counterclaim from a lawsuit that Oamic Ingredients LLC is pursuing against its ex-chief executive.

  • February 08, 2024

    Federal Circuit Revives Food Slicer Patent Challenges

    The Federal Circuit on Thursday threw out a pair of Patent Trial and Appeal Board decisions that found Weber Inc. failed to show claims in food slicer patents owned by rival Provisur Technologies were invalid, sending the proceedings back to the board.

  • February 08, 2024

    IP Forecast: 2nd Circ. To Hear TM Fight Over Whiskey Bottles

    The Second Circuit will consider whether a jury in the Southern District of New York was wrong to decide that the shape of bottles used by the Bulleit bourbon brand is distinctive enough to be protected by trademark law. Here's a look at that case — plus all the other major intellectual property matters on deck in the coming week.

  • February 08, 2024

    DuPont Spinoffs Can't Escape PFAS Suit In NC

    The North Carolina Business Court ruled Wednesday that spinoff companies of DuPont have to pay up if the legacy business is found liable for contaminating the environment with "forever chemicals" in a lawsuit brought by the state attorney general.

  • February 08, 2024

    Winery Wedding Ban Doesn't Stomp Out Speech, Group Says

    A Michigan township's law limiting wineries' ability to host events and weddings is not restricting their speech, a nonprofit backing the regulations said Wednesday, as it tries to whittle down the vintners' constitutional claims ahead of an April trial.

  • February 08, 2024

    Mass Shooting Survivor Loses $17M Judgment On Appeal

    A Texas appellate court has overturned a mass shooting victim's $17 million judgment she won against a restaurant after accusing one of its managers of not sufficiently intervening, ruling that the food joint can't be held to account because the manager wasn't found to have had a responsibility to control the shooter.

  • February 08, 2024

    Wash. Tribes Sue Chevron, Others Over Climate Impacts

    A pair of western Washington tribes claim ExxonMobil, BP, Shell, Chevron, ConocoPhillips and Phillips 66 have lied to consumers about the harmful climate impacts of their fossil fuel products, imperiling their lands and resources and citizens' health, according to complaints removed to federal court by Chevron.

  • February 08, 2024

    DC Circ. Skeptical Of 5-Hour Energy Partner's Tax Challenge

    D.C. Circuit judges seemed skeptical of a Canadian citizen's argument that $6.5 million in gains she received from selling a share of a U.S. partnership that sold 5-Hour Energy drinks shouldn't be federally taxed, grappling to understand her reasoning during oral arguments Thursday.

  • February 08, 2024

    EPA Says Backlogged Pesticide Program Getting Updates

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said criticism of its ambitious plan to update an Endangered Species Act review program for pesticides has prompted it to revise maps that contained inaccurate information about species' habitat and make other changes.

  • February 08, 2024

    McDonald's Ends Suit Accusing Managers Of Racist Abuse

    McDonald's and a franchisee have resolved a race bias suit from Black former workers who said their managers called them "ghetto" and "smelly" and fired one of them for complaining about it, according to a filing in Illinois federal court.

  • February 08, 2024

    High Court Sides With Whistleblower Against UBS

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday found that whistleblowers don't need to show retaliatory intent on the part of their employers in order to be protected under federal law, in a unanimous ruling in favor of a former UBS employee and whistleblower who fought to restore a $900,000 jury verdict he secured in 2017.

  • February 07, 2024

    Fluoride Judge To Attys: 'I Don't Need Perry Mason Moments'

    A California federal judge presiding over a bench trial over fluoridated water's risks agreed to give the parties more time to present their cases Wednesday, but told counsel they haven't been "particularly efficient," and that "I don't need the Perry Mason moments — I just need to get to the issues."

  • February 07, 2024

    La. Pizzeria, State Farm Settle Hurricane Damages Suit

    State Farm and a Louisiana pizzeria reached an agreement in their dispute over allegations that the insurer was artificially suppressing the cost of repairs and over-depreciating losses on claims connected to damage from Hurricanes Laura and Delta, the two parties told a Louisiana federal court.

  • February 07, 2024

    Colo. Urges Court To Reject Bid To Nix Delivery, Ride Fees

    A Colorado court should throw out a suit from a conservative group challenging new fees on deliveries and online ride-hailing services, attorneys for the state said, arguing that the transportation funding law that created them does not violate any state statutes.

  • February 07, 2024

    Refrigeration Co. Can't Put ESOP Valuation Suit On Ice

    An industrial refrigeration company can't avoid a former executive's suit alleging it mismanaged an employee stock ownership plan by grossly undervaluing the business, after a North Carolina federal judge ruled he could still sue on behalf of the plan even if he's no longer a trustee.

  • February 07, 2024

    Panel Says Ohio Broke Promise In Brewery District Land Fight

    The Ohio appeals court ruled against the Buckeye State's transportation officials in a battle with Columbus business owners over property the state needed for a highway project, finding that the state agency's counsel acknowledged it did not deliver what it promised in a previous settlement.

  • February 07, 2024

    Starbucks Argues NLRB Has No Say In Firing Decision

    Starbucks has urged a Michigan federal judge to deny the National Labor Relations Board's request to force the company to rehire two fired workers, saying the board doesn't have the right to interfere with the coffee chain's managerial decisions.

  • February 08, 2024

    CORRECTED: Atty Stuck With Sanctions In Trade Secrets Feud

    A California federal judge has hit a CDF Labor Law LLP attorney with sanctions after finding that he recklessly questioned a former Individual Food Service employee about approaching the company's CEO concerning a settlement despite objections to entering text messages to the CEO into evidence, but determined she would hold off on deciding the amount until later in the case.

  • February 07, 2024

    4th Circ. Won't Chip Away At Frito-Lay's Win In ADA Suit

    The Fourth Circuit refused Wednesday to reinstate a lawsuit brought by a former Frito-Lay manager who said she was fired for asking to work from home during the COVID-19 pandemic, finding she failed to rebut the company's argument that she was cut loose for violating company policy.

  • February 07, 2024

    EPA's Dicamba Reapproval Axed For Failure To Notify Public

    An Arizona federal judge revoked the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's approval for the weed killer dicamba after finding the agency violated federal law by failing to properly notify and offer the public a chance to comment on the herbicide approvals.

  • February 07, 2024

    Farming Nonprofit Supports DOL H-2A Wage Rule At 4th Circ.

    A group of ranches and farms' argument that the new U.S. Department of Labor's rule for H-2A workers' wages would facilitate illegal immigration is speculative and the Fourth Circuit should ignore it, a nonprofit organization helping migrants and seasonal workers said.

  • February 07, 2024

    Perrier Bubbles Don't Burst Tax Barrier, Pa. Court Told

    The fizziness in Perrier bottled water is naturally occurring and should put the product in the same nontaxable category as still water under Pennsylvania's tax code, an attorney for a Pennsylvania Sheetz customer told the state's Commonwealth Court on Wednesday.

  • February 06, 2024

    Snoop Dogg Says Post, Walmart Sabotaged Cereal Brand

    Business partners Snoop Dogg and Master P claim Post Foods LLC worked with Walmart to prevent sales of "Snoop Cereal," despite signing a profit-sharing agreement to place the rappers' product on shelves next to Post's well-known cereal brands, according to a lawsuit filed Tuesday in Minnesota state court.

  • February 06, 2024

    Nestle Ducks Baby Formula Antitrust Suit, But Not Gerber

    A New York federal judge on Tuesday cut Switzerland-based Nestle loose from a baby formula packager's antitrust suit alleging Gerber breached a contract and cut an anti-competitive agreement with Perrigo to stave off competition in major retail stores, but ruled that Perrigo and Gerber will have to continue fighting the claims.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Children's Book Writing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Becoming a children's book author has opened doors to incredible new experiences of which I barely dared to dream, but the process has also changed my life by serving as a reminder that strong writing, networking and public speaking skills are hugely beneficial to a legal career, says Shaunna Bailey at Sheppard Mullin.

  • FDA's Recent Litigation Records Are Strong, But Imperfect

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    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notched its share of litigation wins in recent years thanks to a number of key advantages, but the FDA has been less successful in certain highly visible arenas, Jonathan Berman and Colleen Heisey at Jones Day.

  • Starbucks Raise Ruling Highlights Labor Law Catch-22

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    A National Labor Relations Board judge recently ruled that Starbucks violated federal labor law when it gave raises to nonunion employees only, demonstrating that conflicts present in workforces with both union and nonunion employees can put employers in no-win situations if they don't consider how their actions will be interpreted, say attorneys at Duane Morris.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Singapore

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    Singapore is keen to establish itself as a leading international financial center and a key player in the sustainable finance ecosystem, and key initiatives led by its government and other regulatory bodies have helped the Asian nation progress from its initially guarded attitude toward ESG investment and reporting, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • High Court's Chevron Review May Be A Crypto Game-Changer

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    The outcome of the U.S. Supreme Court's review of the Chevron doctrine in its pending Loper v. Raimondo case will potentially usher in a paradigm shift in cryptocurrency regulation, challenging agency authority and raising hopes for a recalibrated approach that favors judicial interpretation, says Sylvia Favretto at Mysten Labs.

  • Alcohol's E-Commerce Spike Brings Regulatory Dilemmas

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    In the evolving landscape of beverage alcohol e-commerce, the clash between supplier marketing and tied-house laws poses challenges, with regulators grappling to keep pace with the digital marketplace, leaving the industry in a gray area, says Jaci Flug at Greenspoon Marder.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • New Regs Will Strengthen Voluntary Carbon Offset Market

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    Voluntary carbon offsets are a vital tool for organizations seeking to achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions — and recent efforts by the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the state of California and others are essential to enhancing the reliability and authenticity of carbon credits, says David Smith at Manatt.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

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    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

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    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

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