Georgia

  • February 06, 2024

    JPML Consolidates Suboxone Dental Decay Suits In Ohio

    The Northern District of Ohio will host consolidated cases brought against Indivior, Reckitt Benckiser and others alleging the companies failed to warn users of opioid addiction treatment Suboxone that it causes dental decay, according to an order from the U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation joining 15 suits.

  • February 06, 2024

    Real Estate Rumors: Valley National, Carlyle, Peachtree

    Valley National Bank is said to have loaned $21.3 million for a self-storage project in Florida, a Carlyle Group venture has reportedly paid $265 million for a Manhattan luxury rental tower and Peachtree Group has reportedly loaned $34.5 million for a student housing complex in Florida.

  • February 06, 2024

    Ga. Justices To Review Gov't Listening To Atty-Client Calls

    The Georgia Supreme Court agreed Tuesday to hear the case of a man serving a 20-year prison sentence and seeking a new assault trial on the grounds that law enforcement officials improperly listened to three jailhouse calls between him and his lawyer.

  • February 06, 2024

    Complex Not Covered For $4M Shooting Claim, Insurer Says

    A Nationwide unit told a Georgia federal court it doesn't owe coverage to an Atlanta apartment complex for a tenant's bid to hold it liable for injuries she suffered during a shooting, claiming the complex waited nearly a year to notify the insurer.

  • February 06, 2024

    Ga. Atty Disbarred For 'Systemic Abandonment' Of Clients

    A Peach State attorney with a history of disciplinary infractions was disbarred Tuesday by the Georgia Supreme Court for his "systemic abandonment of multiple clients," including several jailed criminal defendants.

  • February 06, 2024

    DOD Dodges White Commissary Worker's Race Bias Suit

    The U.S. Department of Defense defeated a white commissary worker's lawsuit claiming she was threatened with a suspension after a Black colleague falsely accused her of using a racial slur, with a Georgia federal judge ruling that she hadn't identified a comparable co-worker who was treated better.

  • February 06, 2024

    Film Producer Owes Crew For Work On Failed Movie

    The producer of a scuttled film project owes unpaid wages to workers and a line manager hired for the production, but the full amount owed to crew members will have to be decided by a jury, according to a Georgia federal court order.

  • February 05, 2024

    Ex-Trader Tells Jury $30M Losses Were Mistakes, Not Fraud

    An ex-trader charged with tanking his former employer by claiming inflated commissions and entering unauthorized trades that caused $30 million in losses testified Monday that he wasn't trying to defraud others but rather cover his hedges and correct significant mistakes he'd made while trading.

  • February 05, 2024

    Ga. Doctor's Roundup Fight Revived On Remand

    An Eleventh Circuit panel on Monday revived on remand from the full Eleventh Circuit a Georgia doctor's lawsuit alleging Monsanto failed to warn of Roundup's alleged cancer risks, clarifying that the doctor's state failure-to-warn claim is not expressly preempted by federal law and Monsanto hasn't shown implied preemption.

  • February 05, 2024

    Ayahuasca Church Asks 11th Circ. To Rehear DEA Fight

    A Florida church has asked the Eleventh Circuit to reconsider a ruling affirming the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration's denial of a request to use the psychedelic substance ayahuasca for religious purposes, arguing that the majority made a "precedent-setting error."

  • February 05, 2024

    Proposed Class Action Settlement May Cost Acella $46.5M

    A proposed agreement to end a class action over thyroid medication, after a U.S. Food and Drug Administration inspection found products with an active ingredient above and below label specifications, may cost Acella Pharmaceuticals $46.5 million.

  • February 05, 2024

    AWOL Defendant Puts Ga. Pandemic Loan Fraud Trial On Hold

    A Georgia federal judge put on ice a trial that was planned to begin Monday after one of the three defendants accused of taking part in a multimillion-dollar pandemic loan fraud scheme failed to show up in court and now has federal marshals on his trail.

  • February 05, 2024

    Norfolk Southern Slams Investors' Fraud Suit Over Derailment

    Norfolk Southern has asked a New York federal court to dump proposed class allegations that it misled investors by falsely touting its commitments to safety while embarking on risky cost-cutting operational and staffing changes that ultimately led to last year's fiery derailment in East Palestine, Ohio.

  • February 05, 2024

    No CGL Coverage For Home Depot Data Breach, 6th Circ. Told

    Two insurers have told the Sixth Circuit they owe no commercial general liability coverage to Home Depot for its $172 million settlement with financial institutions over a 2014 breach of customer payment information, arguing an electronic data exclusion wholly barred coverage for the institutions' claimed losses.

  • February 05, 2024

    Ga. Sues Federal Gov't Over Medicaid Expansion Program

    Georgia has sued the Biden administration to keep the state's Medicaid program for low-income residents running until 2028, arguing the program was illegally cut short by a federal agency and that its initial five-year term must be honored.

  • February 05, 2024

    Music Publisher Asks Justices To Limit Copyright Damages

    Warner Chappell Music Inc. urged the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday to limit the damages a plaintiff can recover in copyright ownership litigation to three years before a complaint is filed, arguing that the only time a party can extend that period is for instances involving fraud.

  • February 05, 2024

    Walmart Slip Suit Revived After Panel's Video Review

    A man who slipped on water at Walmart will get to continue his case after an Eleventh Circuit appellate panel overturned summary judgment in favor of the retail juggernaut, ruling that a jury could reasonably find water on the floor not only caused the slip but was there long enough for Walmart to fix the hazard.

  • February 05, 2024

    BakerHostetler Brings On Ex-Federal Prosecutor In Atlanta

    BakerHostetler has built out its white collar and litigation team in Atlanta with the addition of a former federal prosecutor of over a decade, bringing expertise in working on cybersecurity, national security offenses and violent crimes.

  • February 05, 2024

    Feds Want 20-Year Term For $30M Laundering Scheme Head

    A Georgia man convicted for his role in a $30 million money laundering scheme has urged a federal court to reject prosecutors' recommended 20-year prison sentence for his "horrendous criminal conduct" and for fleeing his trial.

  • February 02, 2024

    Insurance Coverage Excluded In Condo Sale, 11th Circ. Told

    An insurance company urged the Eleventh Circuit on Friday to reverse a lower-court decision forcing it to provide coverage in a Florida condominium sale gone wrong, saying it was excluded from defending a claim against a real estate agent accused of converting the transaction's proceeds.

  • February 02, 2024

    Pushing To Make The Formerly Incarcerated A Protected Class

    After a pair of formerly incarcerated activists helped convince local leaders in Atlanta to extend anti-discrimination protections to people with criminal records by making them a legally protected class, they and others are now working to get more cities — and eventually maybe the federal government — to do the same.

  • February 02, 2024

    Clerk Says Ga. School District Fired Her For Pumping At Work

    A Georgia school district engaged in pregnancy discrimination when it fired a clerk for refusing to meet with students and visitors while pumping breast milk, the clerk alleged in a suit filed in Georgia federal court.

  • February 02, 2024

    Ga. Appeals Court Scraps Bond Order In Auto Plant Fight

    A group of Georgia residents hoping to block the construction of a $5 billion Rivian electric car plant shouldn't have been required to post a six-figure bond to continue with their litigation, a state Court of Appeals panel ruled Friday, overturning a county trial court's ruling.

  • February 02, 2024

    Foreign Liquidators Say SEC Plan Is Counter To Cayman Law

    Liquidators appointed by a Cayman Islands court to wind down a Cayman-based feeder fund of a Florida investment firm accused by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission of defrauding hundreds of investors urged the Eleventh Circuit on Friday to toss a distribution plan they say contravenes Cayman Islands law.

  • February 02, 2024

    Progressive Faces Trial In Car Undervaluation Class Action

    Progressive insurance units may have to face a jury trial on claims they systematically undervalued totaled cars after a Georgia federal judge rejected the company's bid to end the suit, ruling policyholders had enough evidence to argue they were shortchanged on claim payouts.

Expert Analysis

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

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    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Questions Awaiting Justices In 'Repugnant' Verdicts Hearing

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    In McElrath v. Georgia, the U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether the double jeopardy clause bars retrial when a jury reaches a so-called repugnant, or logically contradictory, verdict — with the ultimate resolution resting on how this narrow issue is framed, say Brook Dooley and Cody Gray at Keker Van Nest.

  • How Justices Could Rule On A Key Copyright Statute

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    Attorneys at Manatt discuss how the U.S. Supreme Court may choose to address a fundamental accrual issue in Warner Chappell Music v. Nealy, which precedents the court may look to in analyzing the issue and the challenges copyright claimants may face going forward.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

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    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • 1st Tax Easement Convictions Will Likely Embolden DOJ, IRS

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    After recent convictions in the first criminal tax fraud trial over allegedly abusive syndicated conservation easements, the IRS and U.S. Department of Justice will likely pursue other promoters for similar alleged conspiracies — though one acquittal may help attorneys better evaluate their clients' exposure, say Bill Curtis and Lauren DeSantis-Then at Polsinelli.

  • The Self-Funded Plan's Guide To Gender-Affirming Coverage

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    Self-funded group health plans face complicated legal risks when determining whether to cover gender-affirming health benefits for their transgender participants, so plan sponsors should carefully weigh how federal nondiscrimination laws and state penalties for providing care for trans minors could affect their decision to offer coverage, say Tim Kennedy and Anne Tyler Hall at Hall Benefits Law.

  • Lenders Must Prep For Ga. Commercial Financing Disclosures

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    Since Georgia’s new commercial financing disclosure requirements may be a lender's first foray into complicated Truth-In-Lending-Act-style laws, providers should work with investor counterparties to prepare early disclosures, in compliance with statutory tolerances, for borrowers whose loan agreements take effect Jan. 1, says Melissa Richards at Buchalter.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

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    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • Ga. Ruling A Win For Plaintiffs Injured By Older Products

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    The Georgia Supreme Court's recent opinion in Ford Motor Co. v. Cosper gives plaintiffs the assurance that even if they are injured by older products, they can still bring claims under state law if the manufacturer used a design that it knew, or should have known, created a risk of substantial harm, says Rob Snyder at Cannella Snyder.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

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    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

  • Series

    Playing In A Rock Cover Band Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Performing in a classic rock cover band has driven me to hone several skills — including focus, organization and networking — that have benefited my professional development, demonstrating that taking time to follow your muse outside of work can be a boon to your career, says Michael Gambro at Cadwalader.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Espinosa On 'Lincoln Lawyer'

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    The murder trials in Netflix’s “The Lincoln Lawyer” illustrate the stark contrast between the ethical high ground that fosters and maintains the criminal justice system's integrity, and the ethical abyss that can undermine it, with an important reminder for all legal practitioners, say Judge Adam Espinosa and Andrew Howard at the Colorado 2nd Judicial District Court.

  • What Panama Canal Award Ruling Means For Int'l Arbitration

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    As the prevalence of international arbitration grows, the Eighth Circuit’s recent decision in Grupo Unidos v. Canal de Panama may change how practitioners decide what remedies to seek and where to raise them if claims are rejected, says Jerry Roth at FedArb.

  • Hollywood Labor Negotiations Provide AI Road Map

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    Sigma Khan at Henein Hutchison uses the recent Hollywood labor strikes — one of the first instances of a mass entertainment industry legal conflict where concerns over artificial intelligence's intrusion into the workspace has become a crucial issue — to analyze how litigation, legislation and contracts can aid in a landscape transformation precipitated by AI.

  • Opinion

    Newman Suspension Shows Need For Judicial Reform

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    The recent suspension of U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman following her alleged refusal to participate in a disability inquiry reveals the need for judicial misconduct reforms to ensure that judges step down when they can no longer serve effectively, says Aliza Shatzman at The Legal Accountability Project.

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