Government Contracts

  • March 12, 2024

    Feds Cement Plea Deals In Ready-Mix Bid Rig Case

    A Georgia concrete company and an executive accused of participating in a price-fixing and bid-rigging scheme have reached plea agreements with the federal government, according to notices filed Tuesday.

  • March 12, 2024

    TransUnion Unit Pays $37M On Credit Card Data Misuse Claim

    TransUnion's data unit Argus Information & Advisory Services will pay $37 million to the federal government to resolve allegations it violated the False Claims Act by allegedly misusing anonymized credit card data it obtained from banks under contracts with federal regulators over a decade-long period, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Tuesday.

  • March 12, 2024

    Contractor Says Claims Over Nixed $18M Army Corps Deal Valid

    An Army Corps of Engineers construction contractor told a Court of Federal Claims judge it had properly supported its arguments that the Corps waived a contract deadline before terminating an $18.1 million contract for default, and that the company had been entitled to a time extension.

  • March 12, 2024

    Court Bars Ex-Exec From Sharing Info On Co.'s Body Armor

    A North Carolina federal court granted a defense contractor's request to stop a former sales executive from sharing confidential information and export-controlled data with a foreign rival, while the court reviews the contractor's allegations.

  • March 12, 2024

    Pharmacy Calls $11M False Claims Case A 'House Of Cards'

    A compounding pharmacy and its president trashed the Connecticut attorney general's $11 million false claims and kickback allegations against them as a "house of cards" that awarded "a sweetheart cooperation deal" to an alleged co-conspirator and improperly benefited private attorneys, calling instead for a judgment against the state.

  • March 12, 2024

    Ex-Judge Loses Suit Over 'Tsunami Of Public Ridicule'

    An appellate court has refused to revive a former New York state trial court judge's suit accusing a Democratic county committee and several related officials of releasing a "tsunami of public ridicule" against her, saying her breach of contract claims lacked legal standing and her defamation claim was untimely.

  • March 12, 2024

    No Jail Time For Brothers In NYC Mayor Straw Donor Case

    Two brothers at the helm of a Queens construction safety company won't serve any prison time for their roles in a straw donor scheme that inflated public funding for New York City Mayor Eric Adams' 2021 campaign, a judge ruled Tuesday.

  • March 11, 2024

    Gov't Says Cost Trumps Return In Dish Spectrum Fraud Case

    The U.S. Department of Justice asked a federal judge to dismiss a suit accusing Dish Network of trying to buy discounted spectrum through sham companies, saying the plaintiff hasn't shown that Dish hid its interest in the buyers and the companies never received Federal Communications Commission bidding credits anyway.

  • March 11, 2024

    DOD's $850B Budget Request For 2025 Prioritizes Readiness

    The White House on Monday proposed an $849.8 billion discretionary budget for the U.S. Department of Defense for fiscal year 2025, focusing heavily on supporting readiness programs over other priorities.

  • March 11, 2024

    Navajo Says Funding Bid Backed By Self-Determination Act

    The Navajo Nation urged a D.C. federal judge to grant it a quick win in its challenge to allegedly inadequate judicial funding, saying the federal government's arguments for why it shouldn't recoup a $15 million interest shortfall can't survive scrutiny under the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act.

  • March 11, 2024

    Feds Pitch Draft Plan For Contested Bears Ears Monument

    The Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service are asking for public input on a draft resource management plan for the Bears Ears National Monument, prepared with input from partners including five tribal nations.

  • March 11, 2024

    Pfizer Slams Ex-Compliance Officer's Whistleblower Claims

    Pfizer has asked a California federal court to again dismiss the bulk of a discrimination and retaliation lawsuit filed by a former compliance officer for the pharmaceutical giant, arguing his latest suit is "largely a regurgitation of his original complaint."

  • March 11, 2024

    Atlanta Must Pay EPA $485K Fine Over Trail Construction

    The city of Atlanta will be forced to pay a $485,000 fine to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency over its unauthorized construction of a public trail along a protected creek after a Georgia federal judge ruled Monday that the project had violated the terms of a decades-old consent decree.

  • March 11, 2024

    DC Circ. Probes Gov't Trial Strategy For Ex-HUD Official

    A former assistant inspector general for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development who is urging the D.C. Circuit to toss his conviction for falsifying government documents seemed to get a sympathetic ear from at least one judge during oral arguments on Monday.

  • March 11, 2024

    10th Circ. Says Colo. Logging Plan Didn't Overlook Lynx

    A Tenth Circuit panel on Monday said a conservation group's claim that federal agencies failed to properly consider the impact of a Colorado forest logging plan on sensitive Canada lynx populations "misses the mark," according to a published opinion rejecting the group's challenge.

  • March 11, 2024

    DOD Expands Contractor Cybersecurity Info Sharing Program

    The U.S. Department of Defense on Monday finalized a rule revising the criteria for defense contractors to participate in a voluntary program for sharing information on cybersecurity threats among themselves, saying it expects to attract thousands of new participants.

  • March 11, 2024

    FERC Says Nixing Power Market Revision Was Right Move

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Friday defended its rejection of a regional grid operator's revision of its capacity market rules due to competition worries, telling the D.C. Circuit that utility giant Entergy Inc. has no basis to challenge the decision.

  • March 11, 2024

    Wash. Law Aimed At GEO's Migrant Facility Partially Barred

    A Washington federal judge has halted the state from conducting unannounced inspections and imposing new health and safety standards at an immigration detention facility, saying that a statute authorizing those actions unlawfully discriminates against GEO Group Inc., the facility's operator.

  • March 11, 2024

    Steptoe Adds Dentons' Ex-Global Security Chief As Partner

    Steptoe LLP has added a security and threat analysis expert who previously served as Dentons' global chief security officer as a partner in Washington, D.C., the firm announced Monday.

  • March 11, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Delaware's Court of Chancery became a hot topic in New Orleans last week as litigators and judges at an annual convention acknowledged the First State's corporate law preeminence is under scrutiny. Back home, the court moved ahead on disputes involving Meta Platforms, Abercrombie & Fitch and Donald Trump.

  • March 08, 2024

    Biden Administration Must Use Border Wall Funds, For Now

    A Texas federal judge on Friday ordered the Biden administration to use funds Congress specifically designated for the Southwest border wall to continue construction, issuing a preliminary injunction and finding that Texas and Missouri could face substantial harm to their state budgets without the injunction.

  • March 08, 2024

    Trump 'An Existential Threat' To Rule Of Law, Attys Warn

    Former President Donald Trump represents an "existential threat" to democracy and the rule of law, legal experts said Friday at a conference on white collar crime in San Francisco.

  • March 08, 2024

    Mich. Court Can't Shush Library Whistleblower, Panel Says

    A Michigan appeals court has revived a former library director's whistleblower suit alleging she was fired for questioning whether the library could use public funds to pay for a board member's godson to open a restaurant on the premises, saying she reported ongoing conduct which is considered protected activity.

  • March 08, 2024

    Judge Sweeps Aside 9 Protests To CBP's $900M Support Deals

    The federal claims court cleared U.S. Customs and Border Protection's decision to deny nine bidders spots on $900 million support deals, finding reasonable the agency's assessment that their past work wasn't similar enough to the requested artificial intelligence development services.

  • March 08, 2024

    DOJ Eyes FCPA For New Whistleblower Rewards Program

    U.S. Department of Justice officials on Friday signaled a renewed emphasis on fighting foreign corruption, saying its planned whistleblower rewards program should prove useful in Foreign Corrupt Practices Act cases against private companies, and warned companies against running afoul of new rules barring the sale of personal data to foreign adversaries of the U.S.

Expert Analysis

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

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    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Suspension And Debarment: FY 2023 By The Numbers

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    A comparative analysis of System for Award Management data, culminating with fiscal year 2023, reveals a year-over-year drop in annual suspension and debarment numbers so significant as to leave the government contracting community trying to figure out what is happening, says David Robbins at Jenner & Block.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

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    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • Contracts Disputes Recap: Expect Strict Application Of Rules

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    Zachary Jacobson and Sarah Barney at Seyfarth examine four recent cases highlighting the importance, for both contractors and government agencies, of strict compliance with the Contract Disputes Act’s jurisdictional requirements and with the Federal Acquisition Regulation's remedy-granting clauses.

  • Unpacking The FAR Council's Cybersecurity Rules Proposal

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    New reporting and information sharing requirements in the Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council's recently proposed cybersecurity regulations would create new False Claims Act enforceability risks, and could be a focus for the U.S. Department of Justice's Civil Cyber Fraud Initiative, say Townsend Bourne and Lillia Damalouji at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

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    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

  • Series

    Playing In A Rock Cover Band Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Performing in a classic rock cover band has driven me to hone several skills — including focus, organization and networking — that have benefited my professional development, demonstrating that taking time to follow your muse outside of work can be a boon to your career, says Michael Gambro at Cadwalader.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Espinosa On 'Lincoln Lawyer'

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    The murder trials in Netflix’s “The Lincoln Lawyer” illustrate the stark contrast between the ethical high ground that fosters and maintains the criminal justice system's integrity, and the ethical abyss that can undermine it, with an important reminder for all legal practitioners, say Judge Adam Espinosa and Andrew Howard at the Colorado 2nd Judicial District Court.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Deference Limit, Close-At-Hand Doctrine

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Roke Iko at MoFo examines a recent decision from the U.S. Court of Federal Claims about the parameters of agency deference, and one from the U.S. Government Accountability Office that highlights the risk to offerors of relying heavily on evaluators’ prior knowledge.

  • New DOJ Roles Underscore National Security Focus

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    The U.S. Department of Justice’s recent creation of two new leadership positions signals to the private sector that federal law enforcement is pouring resources into corporate investigations to identify potential national security violations, say attorneys at Ballard Spahr.

  • Opinion

    Newman Suspension Shows Need For Judicial Reform

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    The recent suspension of U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman following her alleged refusal to participate in a disability inquiry reveals the need for judicial misconduct reforms to ensure that judges step down when they can no longer serve effectively, says Aliza Shatzman at The Legal Accountability Project.

  • Lessons From Verizon's Cybersecurity FCA Self-Disclosure

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    A Verizon unit’s recent agreement to settle allegations of cyber-related False Claims Act violations illustrates the interplay between the government's prioritization of cybersecurity enforcement and the potential benefits of voluntarily disclosing cybersecurity failures, says Denise Barnes at Honigman.

  • How And Why Your Firm Should Implement Fixed-Fee Billing

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    Amid rising burnout in the legal industry and client efforts to curtail spending, pivoting to a fixed-fee billing model may improve client-attorney relationships and offer lawyers financial, logistical and stress relief — while still maintaining profit margins, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Unpacking OMB's Proposed Uniform Guidance Rewrite

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    Affected organizations, including state and local governments, should carefully review the Office of Management and Budget's proposed overhaul of uniform rules for administering over $1 trillion in federal funding distributed each year, and take the opportunity to submit comments before the December deadline, says Dismas Locaria at Venable.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Needs Defense Amid Political Threats

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    Amid recent and historic challenges to the judiciary from political forces, safeguarding judicial independence and maintaining the integrity of the legal system is increasingly urgent, says Robert Peck at the Center for Constitutional Litigation.

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