Government Contracts

  • March 12, 2024

    Suncor Deal With Colo. Over Air Monitoring Gets Judge's OK

    A Colorado state judge has approved a settlement agreement between Suncor and state air regulators over air quality monitoring around the oil and gas company's refinery near Denver.

  • March 12, 2024

    FEMA Claims Process Leaves NM Fire Victims Lost, Suit Says

    Five New Mexico residents are suing the Federal Emergency Management Agency over its response to a massive 2022 fire, alleging it has created delay, confusion and ambiguity in the claims process for the fire's victims.

  • March 12, 2024

    2nd Circ. Revives Parts Of McKesson Whistleblower Suit

    The Second Circuit on Tuesday revived parts of a lawsuit brought by a McKesson Corp. whistleblower who accuses the pharmaceutical company of a kickback scheme, finding that the lower court should reconsider the claims that were brought under state anti-kickback laws.

  • March 12, 2024

    Feds Cement Plea Deals In Ready-Mix Bid Rig Case

    A Georgia concrete company and an executive accused of participating in a price-fixing and bid-rigging scheme have reached plea agreements with the federal government, according to notices filed Tuesday.

  • March 12, 2024

    TransUnion Unit Pays $37M On Credit Card Data Misuse Claim

    TransUnion's data unit Argus Information & Advisory Services will pay $37 million to the federal government to resolve allegations it violated the False Claims Act by allegedly misusing anonymized credit card data it obtained from banks under contracts with federal regulators over a decade-long period, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Tuesday.

  • March 12, 2024

    Contractor Says Claims Over Nixed $18M Army Corps Deal Valid

    An Army Corps of Engineers construction contractor told a Court of Federal Claims judge it had properly supported its arguments that the Corps waived a contract deadline before terminating an $18.1 million contract for default, and that the company had been entitled to a time extension.

  • March 12, 2024

    Court Bars Ex-Exec From Sharing Info On Co.'s Body Armor

    A North Carolina federal court granted a defense contractor's request to stop a former sales executive from sharing confidential information and export-controlled data with a foreign rival, while the court reviews the contractor's allegations.

  • March 12, 2024

    Pharmacy Calls $11M False Claims Case A 'House Of Cards'

    A compounding pharmacy and its president trashed the Connecticut attorney general's $11 million false claims and kickback allegations against them as a "house of cards" that awarded "a sweetheart cooperation deal" to an alleged co-conspirator and improperly benefited private attorneys, calling instead for a judgment against the state.

  • March 12, 2024

    Ex-Judge Loses Suit Over 'Tsunami Of Public Ridicule'

    An appellate court has refused to revive a former New York state trial court judge's suit accusing a Democratic county committee and several related officials of releasing a "tsunami of public ridicule" against her, saying her breach of contract claims lacked legal standing and her defamation claim was untimely.

  • March 12, 2024

    No Jail Time For Brothers In NYC Mayor Straw Donor Case

    Two brothers at the helm of a Queens construction safety company won't serve any prison time for their roles in a straw donor scheme that inflated public funding for New York City Mayor Eric Adams' 2021 campaign, a judge ruled Tuesday.

  • March 11, 2024

    Gov't Says Cost Trumps Return In Dish Spectrum Fraud Case

    The U.S. Department of Justice asked a federal judge to dismiss a suit accusing Dish Network of trying to buy discounted spectrum through sham companies, saying the plaintiff hasn't shown that Dish hid its interest in the buyers and the companies never received Federal Communications Commission bidding credits anyway.

  • March 11, 2024

    DOD's $850B Budget Request For 2025 Prioritizes Readiness

    The White House on Monday proposed an $849.8 billion discretionary budget for the U.S. Department of Defense for fiscal year 2025, focusing heavily on supporting readiness programs over other priorities.

  • March 11, 2024

    Navajo Says Funding Bid Backed By Self-Determination Act

    The Navajo Nation urged a D.C. federal judge to grant it a quick win in its challenge to allegedly inadequate judicial funding, saying the federal government's arguments for why it shouldn't recoup a $15 million interest shortfall can't survive scrutiny under the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act.

  • March 11, 2024

    Feds Pitch Draft Plan For Contested Bears Ears Monument

    The Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service are asking for public input on a draft resource management plan for the Bears Ears National Monument, prepared with input from partners including five tribal nations.

  • March 11, 2024

    Pfizer Slams Ex-Compliance Officer's Whistleblower Claims

    Pfizer has asked a California federal court to again dismiss the bulk of a discrimination and retaliation lawsuit filed by a former compliance officer for the pharmaceutical giant, arguing his latest suit is "largely a regurgitation of his original complaint."

  • March 11, 2024

    Atlanta Must Pay EPA $485K Fine Over Trail Construction

    The city of Atlanta will be forced to pay a $485,000 fine to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency over its unauthorized construction of a public trail along a protected creek after a Georgia federal judge ruled Monday that the project had violated the terms of a decades-old consent decree.

  • March 11, 2024

    DC Circ. Probes Gov't Trial Strategy For Ex-HUD Official

    A former assistant inspector general for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development who is urging the D.C. Circuit to toss his conviction for falsifying government documents seemed to get a sympathetic ear from at least one judge during oral arguments on Monday.

  • March 11, 2024

    10th Circ. Says Colo. Logging Plan Didn't Overlook Lynx

    A Tenth Circuit panel on Monday said a conservation group's claim that federal agencies failed to properly consider the impact of a Colorado forest logging plan on sensitive Canada lynx populations "misses the mark," according to a published opinion rejecting the group's challenge.

  • March 11, 2024

    DOD Expands Contractor Cybersecurity Info Sharing Program

    The U.S. Department of Defense on Monday finalized a rule revising the criteria for defense contractors to participate in a voluntary program for sharing information on cybersecurity threats among themselves, saying it expects to attract thousands of new participants.

  • March 11, 2024

    FERC Says Nixing Power Market Revision Was Right Move

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Friday defended its rejection of a regional grid operator's revision of its capacity market rules due to competition worries, telling the D.C. Circuit that utility giant Entergy Inc. has no basis to challenge the decision.

  • March 11, 2024

    Wash. Law Aimed At GEO's Migrant Facility Partially Barred

    A Washington federal judge has halted the state from conducting unannounced inspections and imposing new health and safety standards at an immigration detention facility, saying that a statute authorizing those actions unlawfully discriminates against GEO Group Inc., the facility's operator.

  • March 11, 2024

    Steptoe Adds Dentons' Ex-Global Security Chief As Partner

    Steptoe LLP has added a security and threat analysis expert who previously served as Dentons' global chief security officer as a partner in Washington, D.C., the firm announced Monday.

  • March 11, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Delaware's Court of Chancery became a hot topic in New Orleans last week as litigators and judges at an annual convention acknowledged the First State's corporate law preeminence is under scrutiny. Back home, the court moved ahead on disputes involving Meta Platforms, Abercrombie & Fitch and Donald Trump.

  • March 08, 2024

    Biden Administration Must Use Border Wall Funds, For Now

    A Texas federal judge on Friday ordered the Biden administration to use funds Congress specifically designated for the Southwest border wall to continue construction, issuing a preliminary injunction and finding that Texas and Missouri could face substantial harm to their state budgets without the injunction.

  • March 08, 2024

    Trump 'An Existential Threat' To Rule Of Law, Attys Warn

    Former President Donald Trump represents an "existential threat" to democracy and the rule of law, legal experts said Friday at a conference on white collar crime in San Francisco.

Expert Analysis

  • How And Why Your Firm Should Implement Fixed-Fee Billing

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    Amid rising burnout in the legal industry and client efforts to curtail spending, pivoting to a fixed-fee billing model may improve client-attorney relationships and offer lawyers financial, logistical and stress relief — while still maintaining profit margins, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Unpacking OMB's Proposed Uniform Guidance Rewrite

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    Affected organizations, including state and local governments, should carefully review the Office of Management and Budget's proposed overhaul of uniform rules for administering over $1 trillion in federal funding distributed each year, and take the opportunity to submit comments before the December deadline, says Dismas Locaria at Venable.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Needs Defense Amid Political Threats

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    Amid recent and historic challenges to the judiciary from political forces, safeguarding judicial independence and maintaining the integrity of the legal system is increasingly urgent, says Robert Peck at the Center for Constitutional Litigation.

  • How Law Firms Can Use Account-Based Marketing Strategies

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    Amid several evolving legal industry trends, account-based marketing can help law firms uncover additional revenue-generating opportunities with existing clients, with key considerations ranging from data analytics to relationship building, say Jennifer Ramsey at stage LLC and consultant Gina Sponzilli.

  • Strategic Succession Planning At Law Firms Is Crucial

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    Senior partners' reluctance to retire, the rise of the nonequity partner tier and generational differences in expectations are all contributing to an increasing number of departures from BigLaw, making it imperative for firms to encourage retirement among senior ranks and provide clearer leadership pathways to junior attorneys, says Laura Leopard at Leopard Solutions.

  • UK Mozambique Ruling Will Have Int'l Ramifications

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    The recent U.K. Supreme Court judgment in Mozambique v. Privinvest considered for the first time stay proceedings under the Arbitration Act, offering guidance on whether claims are a "matter" within the scope of an arbitration clause, which could become a point of reference for foreign courts in the future, say lawyers at Herbert Smith.

  • Maximizing Law Firm Profitability In Uncertain Times

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    As threats of an economic downturn loom, firms can boost profits by embracing the power of bottom-line management and creating an ecosystem where strategic financial oversight and robust timekeeping practices meet evolved client relations, says Shireen Hilal at Maior Strategic Consulting.

  • Steps For Gov't Contractors On The OFCCP's Audit List

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    Federal contractors on the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs' most recent list of firms flagged for potential audit should take certain steps now in light of the agency’s new scheduling letter, which significantly increases the burden and potential risks for contractors, say Andrew Turnbull and Sadé Tidwell at MoFo.

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Reminds Attys That CBP Can Search Devices

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent Malik v. Department of Homeland Security decision adds to the chorus of federal courts holding that border agents don’t need a warrant to search travelers’ electronic devices, so attorneys should consider certain special precautions to secure privileged information when reentering the U.S., says Jennifer Freel at Jackson Walker.

  • Avoiding The Ethical Pitfalls Of Crowdfunded Legal Fees

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    The crowdfunding of legal fees has become increasingly common, providing a new way for people to afford legal services, but attorneys who accept crowdsourced funds must remember several key ethical obligations to mitigate their risks, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • 3 Action Items For Contractors Facing A Gov't Shutdown

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    Federal contractors can help ensure they are well situated to endure a potential government shutdown by reviewing project funding levels and contractual stop-work clauses, and communicating with contracting officers and subcontractors about their respective obligations, says Derek Mullins at Butzel Long.

  • What Large Language Models Mean For Document Review

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    Courts often subject parties using technology assisted review to greater scrutiny than parties conducting linear, manual document review, so parties using large language models for document review should expect even more attention, along with a corresponding need for quality control and validation, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Checking In On How SuperValu Has Altered FCA Litigation

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    Four months after the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in U.S. ex rel. Chutte v. SuperValu, the decision's reach may be more limited than initially anticipated, with the expansion of the scienter standard counterbalanced by some potential defense tools for defendants, say Elena Quattrone and Olivia Plinio at Epstein Becker.

  • Tossed FIFA Bribery Convictions May Spur New DOJ Offense

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    After a New York federal court vacated the bribery convictions of two defendants in the U.S. Department of Justice’s sprawling FIFA probe, prosecutors may continue to pursue foreign commercial corruption through other means, albeit with some limitations, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • Series

    Participating In Living History Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My role as a baron in a living history group, and my work as volunteer corporate counsel for a book series fan association, has provided me several opportunities to practice in unexpected areas of law — opening doors to experiences that have nurtured invaluable personal and professional skills, says Matthew Parker at the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services.

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