Government Contracts

  • February 14, 2024

    Patterson Earnhart Names Equity Partners, Opens Wis. Office

    Native American law firm Patterson Earnhart Real Bird & Wilson LLP has announced two new equity partners, one of whom will lead a new office in Wisconsin.

  • February 13, 2024

    Indian Satellite Co. Wants Justices' View On US Courts' Purview

    The Ninth Circuit erred in ruling it had no jurisdiction over a commercial division of an Indian space agency and, therefore, could not enforce a $1.3 billion arbitral award, an Indian satellite company said in its request to stay the ruling while it takes the matter up with the U.S. Supreme Court.

  • February 13, 2024

    Planned Parenthood Says Immunity Ignored In FCA Case

    Planned Parenthood told the Fifth Circuit that a district court's bases for rejecting its immunity defenses should be rejected, in its opening brief in its appeal in a False Claims Act suit that accuses the group of improperly billing Medicaid programs in Texas and Louisiana for millions after losing its Medicaid credentials.  

  • February 13, 2024

    CMS Must Rethink $4M Training Contract Award, GAO Rules

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services will have to reconsider a contract it awarded to a public relations firm after the U.S. Government Accountability Office sustained all four aspects of a competitor's protest over how their bids were evaluated.

  • February 13, 2024

    COVID Watchdogs Unclear On Whistleblower Rules, GAO says

    Of the three COVID-19 oversight bodies responsible for handling complaints from contractor and grantee whistleblowers, only one believes that whistleblowers are clearly protected from retaliation under the law, the U.S. Government Accountability Office said in a report Tuesday.

  • February 13, 2024

    Judge Orders Revival Of Improperly Canceled Air Force Deal

    The U.S. Air Force must revive a solicitation for a refueling tanker console, the U.S. Court of Federal Claims ordered, agreeing with a bidder that the service hadn't met a condition to cancel the deal.

  • February 13, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Won't Revive Abstract Return Mail Patent

    Alabama-based Return Mail Inc. has failed to persuade the Federal Circuit that its patent for processing undeliverable mail meets patent eligibility requirements, according to a Tuesday order.

  • February 13, 2024

    Mass Arrests In NYC Housing Bribe Case Trouble Attys

    An anti-corruption crackdown targeting New York City public housing workers accused of taking bribes for contract work is raising eyebrows among defense lawyers, who critiqued what they saw as a heavy-handed approach even as many envision quick, favorable resolutions.

  • February 13, 2024

    Tribes Seek Split Arguments In High Court Healthcare Dispute

    Two Native American tribes are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to allow them to separately argue their positions in seeking to uphold rulings that ordered the federal government to reimburse them millions in administrative healthcare costs, adding that the issues presented in the case are at the core of their ability to perform a critical service on their reservation lands.

  • February 13, 2024

    Fluor Fights FCA's Legality In Bid To Escape Fraud Suit

    Fluor Corp. pressed the South Carolina federal court to knock out a False Claims Act suit by former military officers, arguing that the law supporting the entire case unconstitutionally vests private citizens with government powers.

  • February 13, 2024

    Convicted NC Doctor Can't Get Recordings From Prosecutors

    A North Carolina federal judge on Tuesday rejected a doctor's attempt to force prosecutors to turn over recorded phone calls with a telemedicine provider, finding that the requested materials weren't relevant and that she was trying to "manufacture" a way to have her fraud conviction overturned.

  • February 13, 2024

    Officer Says He Was Denied Work Due To Race, Med. Pot Use

    A Connecticut police officer who was injured in training says he was wrongfully denied disability retirement and was unable to secure administrative work after injuring his neck, experiencing discrimination based on his race and ethnicity as well as his physical disability.

  • February 13, 2024

    Ex-IRS Contractor Appeals 5-Year Sentence For Tax Info Leak

    A former IRS contractor sentenced to five years in prison for stealing and leaking former President Donald Trump's tax returns — and those of thousands of other wealthy people — to the media told a D.C. federal court he will appeal his final judgment.

  • February 13, 2024

    Fox Rothschild Beefs Up Government Contracts Team In DC

    Fox Rothschild LLP has added an experienced government contracts attorney from Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP to its Washington, D.C., office.

  • February 13, 2024

    Government Contracts Group Of The Year: Seyfarth

    Seyfarth Shaw LLP continues to defend a historic $367 million award it secured for the city of Anchorage, Alaska — one of the largest monetary judgments ever entered against the U.S. government in a contract dispute — landing the firm among Law360's 2023 Government Contracts Groups of the Year.

  • February 13, 2024

    Blocked Emails No Excuse For Missed Deadline, GAO Says

    The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency reasonably eliminated a Virginia consulting company's bid for a $71.1 million task order because it did not receive the company's emailed revisions by a deadline, the U.S. Government Accountability Office ruled, even though the agency's cybersecurity software blocked the emails.

  • February 12, 2024

    GAO Says Ambiguity Protest Too Late In HHS Comms Deal

    A Virginia-based communications firm lost out on a marketing contract for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services after the U.S. Government Accountability Office ruled that it had not provided a required rate agreement in its quote.

  • February 12, 2024

    Pa. Judge Won't Certify Class In Juvenile Facility Abuse Suit

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has declined to certify a proposed class of former residents of juvenile facilities operated by Abraxas Youth and Family Services who claim to have suffered mental, physical or sexual abuse between 2000 and the present, saying "fact-finding mini-trials" would be needed to adequately identify members.

  • February 12, 2024

    Library Of Congress Must Revisit $450M Software Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has backed protests by Deloitte and another company over $450 million in Library of Congress software development contracts, saying the agency made several errors in how it assessed and compared bids.

  • February 12, 2024

    Colo. Oil Co. Can't Halt Regulators' New Enforcement Efforts

    A Colorado state judge has ruled that his order freezing state oil regulators' actions against K.P. Kauffman Co. Inc. does not stop officials from future enforcement against the oil and gas company.

  • February 12, 2024

    Feds Argue Immunity Again, Post-Discovery, In Flint Lead Case

    The federal government is urging a Michigan federal judge to dismiss claims from Flint residents challenging the Environmental Protection Agency's response to lead exposure that began in 2014, saying that because the agency's decisions were discretionary and subject to policy review, the government has immunity under an exception to the Federal Tort Claims Act.

  • February 12, 2024

    Tenn. Dept. Settles Claims It Ignored Kids' Citizenship Options

    A Tennessee federal court on Monday approved a settlement requiring Tennessee's Department of Children's Services to ensure undocumented children in its care can timely pursue legal status, resolving allegations the department irresponsibly let children age out of a special pathway to citizenship.

  • February 12, 2024

    NY Judge Keeps Navy Contract Trade Secrets Suit Alive

    A New York federal judge partially upheld a trade secrets case against L3 Harris Cincinnati Electronics Corp., finding that BAE Systems plausibly alleged that it was cut out of a government contract for naval defense technology after sharing its proprietary information.

  • February 12, 2024

    Government Contracts Group Of The Year: Hogan Lovells

    Hogan Lovells convinced the U.S. Government Accountability Office that a $1 billion contract for services supporting the Office of Refugee Resettlement's program for unaccompanied children was awarded based on a flawed evaluation, making it one of Law360's 2023 Government Contracts Practice Groups of the Year.

  • February 12, 2024

    Jury Convicts 3 Of $7.9M COVID Aid Fraud Scheme

    A Manhattan federal jury convicted three people of perpetrating a scheme to bilk $7.9 million from the U.S. Small Business Administration through COVID-19 relief applications submitted in other people's names.

Expert Analysis

  • Staying Ahead Of The AI Policymaking Curve

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    With artificial intelligence poised to be the hottest legislative and regulatory topic in 2024, expect the AI policymaking toolbox to continue to expand and evolve as stakeholders in the U.S. and abroad develop, deploy, use and learn more about these technologies, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • What Cos. Can Learn From 2023 Export Enforcement Report

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    A January report summarizing key actions and policy changes undertaken at the Office of Export Enforcement in 2023 is a valuable indicator of future government priorities and the factors companies should consider as they conduct export operations amid what may be a turbulent international trading environment in 2024, says Thaddeus McBride at Bass Berry.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • DOJ's Biopharma Settlement Raises Anti-Kickback Questions

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    In the aftermath of the U.S. Department of Justice's settlement with Ultragenyx over genetic testing programs, it may be prudent to reevaluate genetic tests through the lens of the Anti-Kickback Statute and reconsider whether it is proper for free testing programs to be treated like patient assistance programs, says Mary Kohler at Kohler Health Law.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • GAO Decision Underscores Complexity Of '180-Day Rule'

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    The Government Accountability Office's ruling last month in Washington Business Dynamics, evaluating its eligibility for a small business set-aside contract, provides an important reminder for companies to stay vigilant of developments around the evolving "180-day rule" for submitting a proposal, say Stephen Ramaley and Adam Bartolanzo at Miles & Stockbridge.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • How US Companies Can Wield The New Foreign Bribery Law

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    U.S. companies operating in high-risk markets can use the Foreign Extortion Prevention Act that passed last month to their advantage both in preventing bribe demands and in negotiating with the Justice Department to prevent prosecution or to receive cooperation credit, say attorneys at Squire Patton.

  • A Potential Proactive Tool For Public-Private Joint Ventures

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    In the current environment of heightened antitrust enforcement, the National Cooperative Research and Production Act seems tailor-made for the collaborative work among competitors encouraged by the Biden administration's infrastructure and green energy funding legislation, say Jeetander Dulani and Susan Ebner at Stinson.

  • How Gov't Use Of Suspension And Debarment Has Evolved

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    A recent report to Congress about federal agencies' suspension and debarment activities in fiscal years 2021 and 2022 shows exclusion remains a threat to government contracting businesses, though proactive engagement with suspending-and-debarring officials and alternate forms of redress are becoming more common, says David Robbins at Jenner & Block.

  • Uncharted Waters Ahead For FCA Litigation In 2024

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    Following a year of significant court decisions, settlements, recoveries and proposed amendments, 2024 promises to be a lively year for False Claims Act actions and litigation, and one that will hopefully provide more clarity as FCA jurisprudence evolves, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • What's On Tap For Public Corruption Prosecutions In 2024

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    All signs point toward another year of blockbuster public corruption prosecutions in 2024, revealing broader trends in enforcement and jurisprudence, and promising valuable lessons for defense strategy, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

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