Government Contracts

  • January 30, 2024

    Gov't Contracts Of The Month: Satellites And AI Fighter Jets

    The federal government opened the new year with contracts seeking various military satellite capabilities, all while the U.S. Air Force pushed forward its $5.8 billion campaign for a fleet of autonomous military aircraft. These are Law360's most significant contracts in January.

  • January 30, 2024

    Missing Clearance Dooms Protest Over $57M Navy Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has tossed a protest over an option issued under a $56.9 million task order for Navy parachute training, saying that the protester's lack of a required security clearance meant the challenge was effectively futile.

  • January 30, 2024

    3rd Florida Resident Charged In $9M Medicare Scheme

    A third Florida resident has been charged in connection with a scheme to send fraudulent medical invoices to Medicare to bilk about $9 million from the healthcare program, Manhattan federal prosecutors said Tuesday.

  • January 30, 2024

    4th Circ. Revives Combat IP Theft Suit Against Israeli Co.

    The Fourth Circuit on Tuesday revived an American combat training company's trade secret theft lawsuit against an Israeli company, its U.S. affiliate, a military officer and the Israeli Ministry of Defense, finding the trial court wrongly relied on a prior judgment, which didn't address the Delaware-based affiliate.

  • January 30, 2024

    Allergan Asks 9th Circ. To Ignore Atty's Claims Of Fraud

    Allergan has urged the Ninth Circuit to uphold a California federal court's decision to toss a suit from a patent litigator concerning claims of fraudulently landing dementia drug patents, arguing that the conduct has been publicly disclosed, and that the litigator did not bring any new information to the appeal.

  • January 30, 2024

    Feds Say Talks Preferred In Wis. Tribal Roads Trespass Suit

    The federal government has said it prefers a negotiated resolution with a northern Wisconsin town that allows it to remain part of a tribal road system, but if an agreement can't be reached, it will continue to pursue trespassing claims and past damages against the municipality.

  • January 30, 2024

    Tribe's Repeat Default Bids Disrespect Court, Blue Cross Says

    Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan says a Native American tribe's third request for a default win in its suit alleging the insurer overcharged for tribe members' care is disrespectful and constitutes a continued violation of a court order for the tribe to identify members involved in the insurance plan.

  • January 30, 2024

    Justices Urged To Review Nix Of FCA Sanction Evasion Suit

    A Wyoming company urged the U.S. Supreme Court to look into whether lower courts and the U.S. Department of Justice unlawfully snubbed its allegations that London's Standard Chartered Bank cleared roughly $56 billion in violation of U.S. sanctions targeting Iran.

  • January 29, 2024

    Colo. Justices Ground County's Airport Noise Case

    The Colorado Supreme Court said Monday a county waited decades too long to sue neighboring Denver over a noise-monitoring agreement for the Denver International Airport, finding in a unanimous opinion that the county knew about an alleged breach in 1995 and can't wait until it got unfavorable data to sue.

  • January 29, 2024

    Early Designs For Road Project Naturally Flawed, Jury Hears

    A construction design firm told a Colorado federal jury Monday that it's being sued for nearly $260 million because its initial design of a Denver-area highway expansion had the sort of deficiencies to be expected in such an early pass.

  • January 29, 2024

    Colo. Water District Suit Says Base Contaminated Supply

    A water district serving about 6,500 customers near Colorado Springs claims the Peterson Space Force Base contaminated its water supply by using aqueous film forming foams containing PFAS chemicals for decades, despite knowing the dangers they posed.

  • January 29, 2024

    Split Pa. Justices Let Bankrupt City's Receiver Keep Power

    Pennsylvania's Supreme Court on Monday split over a state-appointed receiver's ability to restrict the administrative powers of elected city officials, affirming an order that let the receiver take control of the troubled town of Chester's finances and day-to-day operations.

  • January 29, 2024

    5 Floridians Sentenced For $67M Medicare Testing Scam

    A man accused of leading a $67 million healthcare fraud conspiracy involving unnecessary genetic testing for Medicare recipients was sentenced to 14 years in prison, along with four co-conspirators who received lesser sentences from a Florida federal judge as recently as Monday.

  • January 29, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Revives Protest Over Rejected Bid For $22B VA Deal

    The Federal Circuit on Monday revived a dispute over a $22.3 billion U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs contract, saying a protester had shown it had a "substantial" chance at the deal if its allegation about VA assessment mistakes were true.

  • January 29, 2024

    Hearing Aid Co. Eargo Investors Ask 9th Circ. To Revive Suit

    Investors of Eargo Inc. have told the Ninth Circuit that a lower court erred in dismissing their class action against the hearing aid company since they sufficiently alleged the firm and its top brass acted with intent to commit insurance billing fraud.

  • January 29, 2024

    DOJ Says Wash. Hospital Had Role In Spinal Surgeon Scandal

    A Tacoma, Washington-based hospital operator failed to address red flags that one of its doctors was performing unnecessary surgeries, instead earning millions of dollars from the neurosurgeon's dangerous misconduct by fraudulently billing the government for his work, federal and state prosecutors have alleged. 

  • January 29, 2024

    Justices Set March Arguments In Tribal Healthcare Dispute

    The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments in March on two federal government petitions seeking to overturn orders that have the potential to cost $2 billion a year to support Native American tribes that provide insurer-funded services to their members.

  • January 29, 2024

    3 Ex-DHS Staffers Get Prison, Probation For Software Theft

    Three former U.S. Department of Homeland Security employees have been sentenced to prison or probation for their alleged roles in conspiring to steal proprietary software and sensitive law-enforcement databases from the government in a scheme to develop a commercial product for sale.

  • January 29, 2024

    Military Contractor Pays $16M In Wages After DOL Probes

    A disaster management company and 61 subcontractors cheated about 2,800 workers out of approximately $16 million in wages and almost 25,000 hours of paid sick time while they provided aid to Afghan refugees at a New Jersey military base, the U.S. Department of Labor said Monday.

  • January 29, 2024

    Federal Employers May Not Weigh Applicants' Salary Histories

    On the 15th anniversary of the enactment of a major anti-pay discrimination bill, the Biden administration on Monday announced several new pay equity measures for federal employees, including one that would bar federal agencies and contractors from considering a job applicant's salary history.

  • January 29, 2024

    V&E Atty Joins Debevoise As National Security Co-Leader

    Debevoise & Plimpton LLP has hired an attorney with over 30 years of experience working in government and private practice to co-lead the firm's national security practice in Washington, D.C., according to a Monday announcement.

  • January 29, 2024

    IRS Worker Gets 5 Years For Airing Tax Info On Trump, Others

    A former IRS contractor who copped to stealing the tax returns of thousands of wealthy people, including former President Donald Trump, and leaking them to the media will serve five years in prison.

  • January 26, 2024

    Elections Agency Broke Contracting Rules, OIG Says

    The federal agency tasked with improving elections does not comply with many Federal Acquisition Regulation requirements in its procurement process, a government watchdog said Friday, mainly blaming the U.S. Election Assistance Commission's problems on its lack of a contracting officer.

  • January 26, 2024

    Enviro Group Launches New Bid To Block Colo. Water Project

    A Colorado environmental group has asked a federal judge to toss approval by the Army Corps of Engineers of a major water pipeline and reservoir project, alleging the agency violated federal laws by failing to consider less environmentally damaging alternatives when analyzing the Northern Integrated Supply Project.

  • January 26, 2024

    Oglala Sioux File Suit For More Law Enforcement Funding

    The Oglala Sioux Tribe has accused the U.S. government of failing to help it hire enough law enforcement officers on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, saying in a South Dakota federal lawsuit that the U.S. Department of the Interior must adhere to its treaty and trust responsibilities.

Expert Analysis

  • The Case For Post-Bar Clerk Training Programs At Law Firms

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    In today's competitive legal hiring market, an intentionally designed training program for law school graduates awaiting bar admission can be an effective way of creating a pipeline of qualified candidates, says Brent Daub at Gilson Daub.

  • Contracts Disputes Recap: Be Mindful Of Termination Clauses

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    Edward Arnold and Sarah Barney at Seyfarth examine three recent rulings — one from the U.S. Court of Federal Claims and two from the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals — that highlight the termination clause as one of the most potent remedy-granting contract clauses.

  • 2 HHS Warnings Highlight Anti-Kickback Risks For Physicians

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    Two recent advisory opinions issued by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Inspector General involve different scenarios and rationales, but together they illustrate the OIG's focus on and disapproval of contractual joint ventures and other revenue-maximizing physician arrangements, say Robert Threlkeld and Elliott Coward at Morris Manning.

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

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    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Best Practices For Defense Tech Startup Financing

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    Navigating the expanding and highly regulated defense technology sector requires careful planning and execution, starting at incorporation, so startups should prepare for foreign investor issues, choose their funding wisely and manage their funds carefully, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

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    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Looking For Defense Contract Appeal Trends In Annual Report

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    A deep dive into the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals annual report for the 2023 fiscal year reveals increases in the number of cases filed, pending motions and expedited or accelerated cases, while the board disposed of fewer cases than in prior fiscal years, say Scott Flesch and Alexandra Prime at Miller & Chevalier.

  • Preparing Law Students For A New, AI-Assisted Legal World

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    As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the legal landscape, law schools must integrate technology and curricula that address AI’s innate challenges — from ethics to data security — to help students stay ahead of the curve, say Daniel Garrie at Law & Forensics, Ryan Abbott at JAMS and Karen Silverman at Cantellus Group.

  • SolarWinds Ushers In New Era Of SEC Cyber Enforcement

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's recent lawsuit against software company SolarWinds Corp. and its chief information security officer is the first time the SEC has ever filed suit over scienter-based fraud involving cybersecurity failures, illustrating that both companies and CISOs need to be extra cautious in how they describe their cybersecurity practices, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Instructions, Jurisdiction, Scrutiny

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Michaela Thornton at MoFo examines three recent protests resolved in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims and the U.S. Government Accountability Office that arose from indefinite-delivery, indefinite-quantity contract awards and offer important reminders about the fundamentals of procurement law.

  • General Counsel Need Data Literacy To Keep Up With AI

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    With the rise of accessible and powerful generative artificial intelligence solutions, it is imperative for general counsel to understand the use and application of data for myriad important activities, from evaluating the e-discovery process to monitoring compliance analytics and more, says Colin Levy at Malbek.

  • A Look At Successful Bid Protests In FY 2023

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    Attorneys at Sheppard Mullin look beyond the statistics in the U.S. Government Accountability Office’s recent annual report on bid protests, sharing their insights about nine categories of sustained protests, gained from reading every fiscal year 2023 decision in which the protester had a positive result.

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

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    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • AI Use May Trigger False Claims Act's Public Disclosure Bar

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    The likely use of publicly available artificial intelligence tools to detect government fraud by combing through large data sets will raise complex questions about a False Claims Act provision that prohibits the filing of claims based on previously disclosed information, say Nick Peterson and Spencer Brooks at Wiley Rein.

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