Health

  • April 05, 2024

    NC High Court Snapshot: Law Firm Battles Defamation Suit

    The Supreme Court of North Carolina has a stacked calendar heading into spring arguments, from an appeal over Black-owned properties targeted for demolition to a law firm's attempt at dodging defamation claims over allegations of voter fraud.

  • April 05, 2024

    Judge Won't Recuse Herself From Doctor's NBA Fraud Trial

    A Manhattan federal judge has refused to step away from the case of a Seattle doctor accused of participating in a scheme to defraud the National Basketball Association's health plan, saying there was "no basis" for his bid to oust her after he took issue with the trial schedule and what he described as systemic barriers.

  • April 05, 2024

    Healthcare Group Of The Year: Williams & Connolly

    Williams & Connolly LLP's recent work securing wins for corporate healthcare defendants, including a jury trial victory in opioid litigation brought by family members of individuals addicted to prescription drugs, has earned the firm a spot as one of Law360's Healthcare Groups of the Year.

  • April 05, 2024

    Ohio Families Can Bolster Bid To End Transgender Law

    An Ohio judge said a pair of Buckeye State families can bolster their constitutional challenge to a new law banning gender-affirming healthcare for minors and blocking trans girls from competing in school-age women's sports, issuing an order allowing the families to file briefs beyond the normal length limit.

  • April 05, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen the BBC sued by former Georgian defense minister David Kezerashvili, Russian businessman Ildar Sharipov file a defamation claim against the publisher of the Liverpool Echo newspaper, MEX Group Worldwide sue Barclays and NatWest, and a climbing gear company hit retailer Next with a claim of copyright infringement. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • April 05, 2024

    Freshfields Reps J&J On $13.1B Deal For Shockwave Medical

    Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer-led Johnson & Johnson has agreed to buy Fenwick & West-advised Shockwave Medical Inc., a provider of a cardiovascular blood flow treatment, at an enterprise value of $13.1 billion, the companies said Friday. 

  • April 04, 2024

    Punishing Docs' Statements Chills Free Speech, 5th Circ. Told

    A right-leaning nonprofit sparred with a group of specialty medical boards and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in front of the Fifth Circuit during oral arguments Thursday, saying that revoking doctors' medical licenses in retaliation for public statements on issues like abortion chills free speech.

  • April 04, 2024

    Tribes And McKinsey Take Final Step In $39.5M Opioid Deal

    A California judge signed off Thursday on the completion of a $39.5 million nationwide settlement deal that resolves all opioids litigation brought by federally recognized tribes against McKinsey & Co.

  • April 04, 2024

    5th Circ. Scrutinizes Data-Tracking On La. Health Provider Site

    A Fifth Circuit panel questioned Louisiana health care providers Thursday on the use of "tracking pixels" on their website, asking counsel for the providers whether a third party like Facebook could access patient records without patient permission.

  • April 04, 2024

    Latham Led Firms In 1st Quarter IPOs As Outlook Brightens

    Latham & Watkins LLP guided the most initial public offerings among law firms in the year's first quarter, benefiting from an improved fundraising climate that is spreading optimism for IPO lawyers at many firms as the second quarter unfolds.

  • April 04, 2024

    Claims Court Backs Defense Health Agency $31M IT Deal Pick

    A U.S. Court of Federal Claims judge denied an information technology contractor's protest of a $31 million IT deal the Defense Health Agency awarded to a competitor, saying he found nothing wrong with how the agency evaluated the contractors' proposals.

  • April 04, 2024

    $1.6M Med Mal Brain Injury Verdict Nixed Over Jury Instruction

    The Virginia Supreme Court on Thursday wiped out a $1.6 million verdict in a malpractice suit by a woman alleging she had a seizure and fell because her doctor didn't properly treat her low blood sodium, saying the trial court should have given the jury an instruction requested by the doctor.

  • April 04, 2024

    Novo Holdings, Catalent Reset Review Clock On $16.5B Deal

    Novo Nordisk Foundation has given the Federal Trade Commission more time for an initial review of Novo Holdings' plan to acquire Catalent in a deal that values the pharmaceutical services company at $16.5 billion.

  • April 04, 2024

    Ga. OB-GYN Office Hit With Data Breach Class Action

    An Atlanta OB-GYN practice has been hit with a class action in Georgia federal court over a January data breach that allegedly impacted the personal and protected health information of tens of thousands of patients.

  • April 04, 2024

    Structure Defense Remains In FTC Hospital Case, But Not Hearing

    When the Federal Trade Commission goes to trial April 29 against an allegedly anti-competitive hospital merger, the agency won't have to contend with defense assertions that its structure is unconstitutional right away, but a North Carolina federal judge refused Thursday to scrub them entirely.

  • April 04, 2024

    HHS Asks Justices To Review 5th Circ. Abortion Ruling

    The Biden administration has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to add a Texas legal clash to its review of whether a federal law requiring emergency medical care can preempt state-level abortion bans, a question before the justices in a separate case.

  • April 04, 2024

    Nurses Want To Merge DaVita Wage Suits Over Unpaid Breaks

    Workers suing kidney care giant DaVita Inc. have asked a Colorado federal judge to consolidate two similar collective actions alleging they were denied wages for work performed during meal and rest breaks, saying overlap between the cases is "inevitable."

  • April 04, 2024

    Higher Ed Groups Warn Of 'Radical Shift' In Suicide Liability

    Four colleges and a slew of higher education advocacy groups have urged the Eleventh Circuit to reject an argument that Atlanta's Emory University should be liable for the suicide of a student, warning that a ruling against the school could bring about a "radical shift" in the university-student relationship.

  • April 04, 2024

    Squire Patton Adds Polsinelli Enviro Atty Pair In Denver

    Squire Patton Boggs LLP announced Thursday that it had added two former Polsinelli PC attorneys to its global environmental, safety and health practice.

  • April 04, 2024

    Adult Day Care Negligence Suit Tossed Without Experts

    A New Jersey appeals court won't let the family of a woman injured at an adult day care revive their suit, finding they haven't put forth evidence to show that the day care's negligence caused the injuries.

  • April 03, 2024

    Sanofi Plans To Settle 4,000 Zantac Cancer Claims

    Sanofi said Wednesday that it has reached an agreement in principle to settle about 4,000 personal injury claims linking the discontinued heartburn drug Zantac to cancer.

  • April 03, 2024

    Microsoft Notches Fed. Circ. Win In 3D Imaging Patent Fight

    The Federal Circuit on Wednesday backed a ruling from an administrative tribunal that wiped out most of a patent issued to a Florida radiologist and his ex-Lockheed Martin business partner, whose company is suing Microsoft over its line of HoloLens AR headsets.

  • April 03, 2024

    Healthcare Company Hid Rising Costs Before IPO, Suit Says

    Elder-focused healthcare company Agilon Health was hit with an investor's proposed class action in New York federal court alleging that the company failed to acknowledge ahead of its initial public offering that it had been affected by rising medical costs for providers.

  • April 03, 2024

    NC AG Greenlights New Monitor For HCA Hospital Amid Probe

    A new organization has taken up the baton to monitor whether HCA Healthcare is in compliance with the agreement that cemented its $1.5 billion acquisition of a North Carolina health system, a pact that is the focus of ongoing litigation between HCA and the state's attorney general.

  • April 03, 2024

    Philly Injection Site Org. Isn't Religious, Judge Rules

    A Pennsylvania federal judge on Wednesday ruled that an overdose prevention organization planning to open a supervised safe-injection site in Philadelphia is not a religious entity, delivering a win to the U.S. Department of Justice, which opposed the site.

Expert Analysis

  • Business Litigators Have A Source Of Untapped Fulfillment

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    As increasing numbers of attorneys struggle with stress and mental health issues, business litigators can find protection against burnout by remembering their important role in society — because fulfillment in one’s work isn’t just reserved for public interest lawyers, say Bennett Rawicki and Peter Bigelow at Hilgers Graben.

  • What FTC's 'Killer Acquisition' Theory Means For Pharma Cos.

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    The Federal Trade Commission's recent lawsuit to block Sanofi's acquisition of a pharmaceutical treatment developed by Maze Therapeutics builds on previous enforcement actions and could indicate the agency's growing willingness to use its so-called killer acquisition theory against perceived attempts to eliminate nascent competition, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Series

    Skiing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    A lifetime of skiing has helped me develop important professional skills, and taught me that embracing challenges with a spirit of adventure can allow lawyers to push boundaries, expand their capabilities and ultimately excel in their careers, says Andrea Przybysz at Tucker Ellis.

  • The Road Ahead For Florida's Drug Importation Program

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    Though the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Florida's drug importation program in January, a series of hurdles — including requisite buy-in from Canada — and potential legal challenges must be addressed before importation can begin, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • What Attorneys Need To Know About H-1B Lottery Changes

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    The newly revamped H-1B lottery process opened Wednesday and promises to bring more fairness to securing highly competitive slots, giving more companies a chance to access highly skilled workers, say Renée Mueller Steinle and Elizabeth Chatham at Stinson.

  • Assessing CDC's Revised Guideline On Opioid Prescriptions

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    Kenneth Weinstein, Nicholas Van Niel and Kate Uthe at Analysis Group look at newly available data to evaluate the impact that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's revised opioid monitoring guideline have had on prescription trends in recent years, highlighting both specific and overall decreases.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Conflict, Latent Ambiguity, Cost Realism

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Markus Speidel at MoFo examines a trio of U.S. Government Accountability Office decisions with takeaways about the consequences of a teaming partner's organizational conflict of interest, a solicitation's latent ambiguity and an unreasonable agency cost adjustment.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Forget Everything You Know About IRAC

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    The mode of legal reasoning most students learn in law school, often called “Issue, Rule, Application, Conclusion,” or IRAC, erroneously frames analysis as a separate, discrete step, resulting in disorganized briefs and untold obfuscation — but the fix is pretty simple, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • Valeant Ruling May Pave Way For Patent-Based FCA Suits

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    The Ninth Circuit’s recent ruling in Silbersher v. Valeant marks a significant development in False Claims Act jurisprudence, opens new avenues for litigation and potentially raises the stakes for patent applicants who intend to do business with the government, say Joshua Robbins and Rick Taché at Buchalter.

  • What's New In FDA's Updated Data Monitoring Guidance

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    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's new guidance on the use of data monitoring committees in clinical trials is set to replace the agency's 2006 guidance on the topic, with notable updates including stronger language indicating a more stringent stance against financial conflicts of interest and adaptation to recent changes in DMC structure, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • Opinion

    Suits Against Insulin Pricing Are Driven By Rebate Addiction

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    A growing wave of lawsuits filed by states, cities and counties against insulin manufacturers and pharmacy benefit managers improperly allocate the blame for rising insulin costs, when in actuality the plaintiffs are partially responsible, says Dan Leonard at Granite Capitol Consulting.

  • Conn. Data Privacy Enforcement Takeaways For Cos.

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    In light of the Connecticut attorney general's recently released report on its enforcement of the Connecticut Data Privacy Act, which focuses on companies' privacy policies, protections of sensitive data and more, businesses can expect increased enforcement scrutiny — especially in areas that are the subject of consumer complaints, say Paul Pittman and Abdul Hafiz at White & Case.

  • Lessons For D&O Policyholders From Pharma Co. Ruling

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    A California federal court's recent decision in AmTrust v. 180 Life Sciences, requiring insurers to advance defense costs for a potentially covered claim, provides a valuable road map for directors and officers insurance policyholders, rebutting the common presumption that a D&O insurer's duty to advance costs is more limited than under other policies, say attorneys at Pasich.

  • How Firms Can Ensure Associate Gender Parity Lasts

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    Among associates, women now outnumber men for the first time, but progress toward gender equality at the top of the legal profession remains glacially slow, and firms must implement time-tested solutions to ensure associates’ gender parity lasts throughout their careers, say Kelly Culhane and Nicole Joseph at Culhane Meadows.

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

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    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

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