Health

  • May 10, 2024

    Retail Group Opposes $1B Arbitral Award Against Walgreens

    An advocacy group for the retail industry is backing Walgreens as it looks to set aside a nearly $1 billion arbitral award in a dispute with a COVID test maker, telling a Delaware federal judge that judicial intervention is warranted in this case.

  • May 10, 2024

    Atty Says Panoramic Fired Her For Raising Compliance Issues

    Panoramic Health faces a wrongful termination suit filed Thursday in Colorado federal court by its former assistant general counsel who claims she was fired after raising concerns about its alleged noncompliance with federal anti-kickback statutes and regulations over its federally funded kidney care contracting program.

  • May 10, 2024

    Lab Exec Sentenced For Deadly Fungal Meningitis Outbreak

    The founder of a Massachusetts drug compounding center was sentenced in Michigan to 10 to 15 years in prison for his role in a fungal meningitis outbreak after he agreed to a plea deal with state prosecutors earlier this year.

  • May 10, 2024

    Okla. Tells Justices 10th Circ. Wrong On PBM Law

    Oklahoma's insurance department Friday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to take up its petition seeking review of a Tenth Circuit decision overturning portions of a state law regulating pharmacy benefit managers, arguing that high court intervention is needed to resolve disagreement among the circuits on federal preemption.

  • May 10, 2024

    Black Doctor Must Arbitrate Bias Claims Against Hospice Co.

    A Black doctor must arbitrate her claims that she was mistreated by non-Black colleagues at a home healthcare company and fired after raising concerns that it was sidestepping Medicare billing regulations, a California federal judge ruled, finding an arbitration agreement she signed is legitimate.

  • May 10, 2024

    UPMC Inks $38M Deal To End Neurosurgery FCA Suit

    The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center has agreed to pay $38 million to put an end to a False Claims Act suit brought by three medical workers from its neurological surgery department who said the medical center fraudulently billed federal healthcare programs.

  • May 10, 2024

    Texas Justices Limit Damages In Unwanted Pregnancy Case

    The Texas Supreme Court said Friday that a woman who sued her doctor for failing to perform a sterilization procedure can't collect damages for emotional and physical pain in connection with her wrongful pregnancy claim, holding that the birth of a healthy child isn't a compensable injury but "a life with inherent dignity and profound, immeasurable value."

  • May 10, 2024

    Off The Bench: Ohtani Translator's Plea, NBA Star Tops Agent

    In this week's Off The Bench, Shohei Ohtani's ex-interpreter will plead guilty, an NBA star wins in his clash with the agent who sought to represent him, and a tennis player who was abused by her former coach is awarded $9 million.

  • May 10, 2024

    What To Know About Biden's ACA Nondiscrimination Rule

    Recently finalized regulations tackling what constitutes discrimination under the Affordable Care Act could have significant impacts on health plans that include greater liability for third-party plan administrators, attorneys say. Here are three things employers should know now that the final rule is on the books.

  • May 10, 2024

    Fox Rothschild Hires Ex-Seed IP Trio On The West Coast

    Fox Rothschild is bringing on more intellectual property talent on the West Coast, announcing Friday that it had added three former Seed IP attorneys to its Seattle offices.

  • May 10, 2024

    No 'Piecemeal' Fees For Infant Data Win Amid 6th Circ. Appeal

    A federal judge said Friday that he wouldn't award attorney fees to children who challenged Michigan's handling of blood samples collected in an infant health screening program until the state's Sixth Circuit appeal is resolved.

  • May 10, 2024

    'Iron Man 2' Actor Guilty Of Wire Fraud In COVID 'Cure' Scam

    A bodybuilder and actor from "Iron Man 2" was found guilty Friday of 11 counts of wire fraud by a Los Angeles federal jury, after prosecutors argued he tried to scam investors in March 2020 by falsely claiming he'd found a cure for COVID-19 and that NBA legend Earvin "Magic" Johnson was a major investor.

  • May 09, 2024

    Wash. Justices Say HR Managers Can Accept Service For Co.

    The Washington State Supreme Court ruled on Thursday that a human resources manager is classified under state law as someone who can receive service on a company's behalf, siding with a personal injury plaintiff in a lawsuit against an Evergreen State nursing home.

  • May 09, 2024

    Judge Clarifies Gilead Didn't Directly Infringe HIV Drug IP

    A Delaware federal judge on Thursday rejected Gilead Sciences' request to amend her judgment finding that two medications in its HIV prevention regimen, Truvada and Descovy, directly infringed the government's invalidated patents, but clarified her judgment to say that non-party patients or physicians committed the infringement.

  • May 09, 2024

    Doc Can't Escape Second Prednisone Overprescribing Suit

    A Pennsylvania federal judge won't strike claims for punitive damages and references to "outrageous" conduct from a complaint alleging that a doctor wrongly overprescribed medications including prednisone, saying the complaint plausibly alleged that he knowingly had a patient on a medication plan that harmed her.

  • May 09, 2024

    Rail Co. Accused Of Retaliation Over FMLA Use

    CSX Transportation Inc. has been hit with a Florida federal lawsuit brought by its workers, who allege in their proposed class action that the rail company discouraged them from lawfully using the Family and Medical Leave Act, including by punishing them for taking advantage of the law.

  • May 09, 2024

    First Zantac Trial Plaintiff Says She Can't Live Normal Life

    An Illinois woman suing the former manufacturers of Zantac heartburn medication and claiming her long-term use of the drug caused her colon cancer testified Thursday that she has struggled to control her bowels since her 2015 diagnosis and has experienced multiple accidents in public places that left her humiliated and fearful to leave her home.

  • May 09, 2024

    Judge Halts DEA's Hearing On Proposed Psychedelics Ban

    An administrative law judge with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration has ordered the agency to cancel a June 10 hearing on its proposal to ban two psychedelic substances while a researcher's federal lawsuit challenging the agency's actions plays out in court, according to an order made public Thursday.

  • May 09, 2024

    Ex-Dental Device CEO Cops To $10.7M Investor Fraud

    The former CEO of a dental device company pled guilty Thursday to defrauding investors out of $10.7 million with false claims that his company received the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's approval for a device he promised would take the place of X-rays.

  • May 09, 2024

    9th Circ. Says Judge Defied Order To Revive Opioid Case

    The Ninth Circuit on Thursday again revived a nearly 7-year-old case against a California doctor for allegedly selling opioid prescriptions and ordered that the case be reassigned, saying the presiding judge had defied the plain language of a previous order to reinstate the indictment.

  • May 09, 2024

    Ex-Official Says NJ, Ethics Board Are 'Stonewalling' Discovery

    A former New Jersey health official has asked a state judge to order the state and its ethics commission to provide full discovery around his claims that he was fired in 2020 for raising concerns about the governor's chief of staff earmarking COVID-19 tests for relatives, accusing the Garden State of "stonewalling" his requests for documents and communications.

  • May 09, 2024

    Caremark Can Seek Arb. In Oklahoma Tribe's Prescription Suit

    An Oklahoma federal court judge has paused a dispute between the Muscogee (Creek) Nation and Caremark LLC until the pharmaceutical company can resolve a bid to compel the tribe into arbitration in an Arizona court over unpaid reimbursement claims.

  • May 09, 2024

    DOJ Task Force To Target Healthcare Monopoly, Collusion

    The U.S. Department of Justice's Antitrust Division sharpened its focus Thursday on healthcare platforms that combine doctors with insurers, data and more in what the administration's top competition official called the "alarming" accumulation of assets.

  • May 09, 2024

    6th Circ. Panel Skeptical Of NLRB Hazard Pay Ruling

    A Sixth Circuit panel questioned on Thursday a National Labor Relations Board decision finding a Michigan nursing home violated federal labor law with its handling of temporary hazard pay and staffing during the COVID-19 pandemic, with judges appearing skeptical the company had to bargain over the changes.

  • May 09, 2024

    Philly Doctor Loses Bid To Restore $15M Bias Award

    A Philadelphia federal judge on Thursday denied a former Thomas Jefferson University Hospital surgeon's request to reinstate a $15 million jury verdict against his onetime employer, reasoning that the judge would have reached the same conclusion as a previous judge who vacated the award before recusing himself from a new trial.

Expert Analysis

  • Trump's NY Civil Fraud Trial Spotlights Long-Criticized Law

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    A New York court’s recent decision holding former President Donald Trump liable for fraud brought old criticisms of the state law used against him back into the limelight — including its strikingly broad scope and its major departures from the traditional elements of common law fraud, say Mark Kelley and Lois Ahn at MoloLamken.

  • Opinion

    Requiring Leave To File Amicus Briefs Is A Bad Idea

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    A proposal to amend the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure that would require parties to get court permission before filing federal amicus briefs would eliminate the long-standing practice of consent filing and thereby make the process less open and democratic, says Lawrence Ebner at the Atlantic Legal Foundation and DRI Center.

  • 2 Recent Suits Show Resiliency Of Medicare Drug Price Law

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    Though pharmaceutical companies continue to file lawsuits challenging the Inflation Reduction Act, which enables the federal government to negotiate for lower prescription drug prices, recent decisions suggest that the reduced drug prices are likely here to stay, says Jose Vela Jr. at Clark Hill.

  • 4 Ways To Motivate Junior Attorneys To Bring Their Best

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    As Gen Z and younger millennial attorneys increasingly express dissatisfaction with their work and head for the exits, the lawyers who manage them must understand and attend to their needs and priorities to boost engagement and increase retention, says Stacey Schwartz at Katten.

  • Decoding The FTC's Latest Location Data Crackdown

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    Following the Federal Trade Commission's groundbreaking settlements in its recent enforcement actions against X-Mode Social and InMarket Media for deceptive and unfair practices with regards to consumer location data, companies should implement policies with three crucial elements for regulatory compliance and maintaining consumer trust, says Hannah Ji-Otto at Baker Donelson.

  • Defense Attys Must Prep For Imminent AI Crime Enforcement

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    Given recent statements by U.S. Department of Justice officials, white collar practitioners should expect to encounter artificial intelligence in federal criminal enforcement in the near term, even in pending cases, say Jarrod Schaeffer and Scott Glicksman at Abell Eskew.

  • Lessons For Nursing Facilities From DOJ Fraud Settlement

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's recent settlement with the owner of skilled nursing and assisted living facilities in Florida provides a cautionary tale of potential fraud risks, and lessons on how facilities can mitigate government enforcement actions, say Callan Stein and Rebecca Younker at Troutman Pepper.

  • Planning For Healthcare-Private Equity Antitrust Enforcement

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    U.S. antitrust agency developments could mean potential enforcement actions on healthcare-related acquisitions by private equity funds are on the way, and entities operating in this space should follow a series of practice tips, including early assessment of antitrust risks on both the state and federal level, say Ryan Quillian and John Kendrick at Covington.

  • 3 Health Insurance Paths For Psychedelic-Assisted Therapy

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    Ahead of potential U.S. Food and Drug Administration approvals for psychedelics as insured treatments, attorneys at Husch Blackwell review pathways for these drugs to achieve coverage as treatments for complex mental health conditions.

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Nonprecedential, Unreasonable, Scope

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    James Tucker at MoFo examines three recent decisions showing that while the results of past competitions may inform bid strategy, they are not determinative; that an agency's award may be deemed unreasonable if it ignores available information; and that a protester may be right about an awardee's noncompliance but still lose.

  • Fears About The End Of Chevron Deference Are Overblown

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    While some are concerned about repercussions if the U.S. Supreme Court brings an end to Chevron deference in the Loper and Relentless cases this term, agencies and attorneys would survive just fine under the doctrines that have already begun to replace it, say Daniel Wolff and Henry Leung at Crowell & Moring.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • Stay Interviews Are Key To Retaining Legal Talent

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    Even as the economy shifts and layoffs continue, law firms still want to retain their top attorneys, and so-called stay interviews — informal conversations with employees to identify potential issues before they lead to turnover — can be a crucial tool for improving retention and morale, say Tina Cohen Nicol and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • Direct Claims Ruling May Alter Gov't Ties To Software Firms

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    A recent Federal Circuit decision allowing a software developer to pursue legal action under the Contract Disputes Act could change the government's relationship with commercial software providers by permitting direct claims, even in third-party purchase situations, say Dan Ramish and Zach Prince at Haynes Boone.

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