Health

  • February 13, 2024

    DOL's Benefits Arm Reports $1.4B In Recoveries In 2023

    The U.S. Department of Labor's Employee Benefits Security Administration announced Tuesday that it recovered more than $1.4 billion in payments to plans, beneficiaries and participants in fiscal year 2023, an amount that is essentially level with the agency's total recoveries from the previous year.

  • February 12, 2024

    Meta Can't Trim Non-Facebook Users' Health Privacy Suit

    Meta Platforms can't cut down a proposed class action alleging it illegally received consumers' sensitive health information through its Meta Pixel tool, a California federal judge ruled Monday, saying the consumers have provided specific enough allegations of the kinds of sensitive information they claim was intercepted.

  • February 12, 2024

    Investors Win Class Cert. Against Failed COVID Test Maker

    Investors suing biotech company Talis Biomedical Corp. have received class certification in a suit alleging the company hurt investors when trading prices sank a month after its initial public offering when the company failed to secure U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for its flagship testing platform.

  • February 12, 2024

    Assure Buys Danam Health To Form $150M Business

    Neurology services company Assure and wellness platform Danam Health said Monday that they will merge in a deal valuing the combined company at roughly $150 million, led by respective legal advisers Dorsey & Whitney LLP and Dykema & Gossett PLLC.

  • February 12, 2024

    Alys Pharmaceuticals Launches With $100M In Financing

    A new immuno-dermatology company created as an amalgamation of six separate startups launched on Monday with $100 million in financing to target dermatological indications.

  • February 12, 2024

    GAO Says Ambiguity Protest Too Late In HHS Comms Deal

    A Virginia-based communications firm lost out on a marketing contract for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services after the U.S. Government Accountability Office ruled that it had not provided a required rate agreement in its quote.

  • February 12, 2024

    Judge Orders Arbitration In Fla. Doctor's New Contract Claim

    A doctor who says he faced retaliation from companies he had contracted with after objecting to violations of the False Claims Act must take his newest allegations to arbitration, a Florida federal judge ruled Monday, rejecting the physician's argument that one of the defendants had waived its arbitration rights.

  • February 12, 2024

    Pa. Judge Won't Certify Class In Juvenile Facility Abuse Suit

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has declined to certify a proposed class of former residents of juvenile facilities operated by Abraxas Youth and Family Services who claim to have suffered mental, physical or sexual abuse between 2000 and the present, saying "fact-finding mini-trials" would be needed to adequately identify members.

  • February 12, 2024

    Rite Aid Seeks To Extend Ch. 11 Exclusivity To Late April

    Drugstore chain Rite Aid has urged a New Jersey bankruptcy judge to extend its Chapter 11 exclusivity period "out of an abundance of caution," explaining that although the company already filed its plan and disclosure statement, an extension would allow constructive mediation between parties.

  • February 12, 2024

    Ex-CEO Of Health Co. Found Guilty Of Fraud After $195M Loss

    An Illinois federal jury on Monday found the former chief executive officer of a healthcare company guilty on all 13 criminal charges brought by the federal government alleging his company tricked consumers into purchasing health insurance that didn't cover what the company promised.

  • February 12, 2024

    NJ Lands $6.4M Deal Over 'Bogus' Medicare Billing Claims

    New Jersey Attorney General Matthew Platkin announced Monday that his office and the Garden State's insurance fraud prosecutor have obtained a $6.4 million consent judgment against the late owner of a mental health clinic chain accused of defrauding Medicaid with "an elaborate bogus-billing scheme."

  • February 12, 2024

    NC High Court Snapshot: Philip Morris Fights Tax Credit Limit

    North Carolina's top court will return in February from an extended hiatus to weigh whether a home healthcare company was correctly ejected from the state's Medicaid program, and if regulators were right to limit state export tax credits for tobacco giant Philip Morris.

  • February 12, 2024

    Ex-NJ County Health Director Claims Ouster Due To Age, Politics

    The former executive director of a Garden State county's health department has claimed that he was fired in retaliation for reporting a secret meeting he had with a newly elected county commissioner who asked about his age and how much longer he planned on working, according to a lawsuit filed in New Jersey state court.

  • February 12, 2024

    Harvard Not Liable For Alleged Morgue Body Part Sales

    A Massachusetts judge ruled Monday that a state law makes Harvard University immune from a dozen lawsuits seeking to hold it liable after a former medical school morgue manager was criminally charged with stealing and selling body parts. 

  • February 12, 2024

    Cigna Patients Say Underpayment Claims Ripe For Class Cert.

    Cigna insurance plan participants urged a California federal court to greenlight an 8,000-member class in their lawsuit accusing the company of colluding with its billing contractor to underpay their out-of-network claims for substance use disorder treatments, saying they were all harmed by the same methodology.

  • February 12, 2024

    Trust Tells NC Biz Court To Oust Atrium From Inheritance

    The last will and testament of a member of one of North Carolina's most prominent textile families has come under scrutiny in the state Business Court, where the family's descendants have argued that Atrium Health shouldn't receive any distributions from a trust belonging to the matriarch's late grandson.

  • February 12, 2024

    Geico Says Medical Fraudsters Nabbed $1.1M In Auto Benefits

    Several unlicensed individuals submitted hundreds of fraudulent charges for services provided to Geico-insured car accident victims, the insurer has alleged in New York federal court, claiming it lost more than $1.1 million in the no-fault insurance fraud scheme.

  • February 12, 2024

    Health Atty Rejoins Troutman Pepper After Solo Practice Stint

    An attorney who specializes in representing life sciences companies in commercial and operational matters has left her solo practice to join Troutman Pepper in Philadelphia, the firm said Monday.

  • February 12, 2024

    Gilead Buying Liver Disease Drugmaker CymaBay For $4.3B

    Gilead Sciences Inc. said Monday that it has agreed to purchase liver disease-focused clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company CymaBay Therapeutics Inc. for $4.3 billion in cash.

  • February 11, 2024

    Rise In Billing For Catheters May Signal $2B Medicare Fraud

    Seven companies may have fraudulently billed Medicare by as much as $2 billion over two years for medical supplies that were never requested or received, according to an analysis by a Washington, D.C.-based group representing healthcare providers.

  • February 09, 2024

    Conn. Judge Guts Healthcare Staffing Co. Partnership Suit

    Citing a lack of subject matter jurisdiction, a Connecticut state court judge has dismissed most of a lawsuit alleging a healthcare staffing firm's part-owner plundered the business, concluding only a dissolution claim should survive.

  • February 09, 2024

    Rite Aid Investors' Attys Get $58M As Walgreens Deal OK'd

    Counsel representing a class of Rite Aid investors will take home nearly $58 million in attorney fees after a Pennsylvania federal judge granted final approval to the $192.5 million deal resolving claims that Walgreens' executives lied about the likelihood of an ultimately unsuccessful merger between the two drugstore chains.

  • February 09, 2024

    DEA Wrong To Block Psilocybin Therapy, 9th Circ. Told

    The Drug Enforcement Administration was wrong to deny a Seattle-based physician's request to treat terminally ill patients with psilocybin, the active ingredient in psychedelic mushrooms, under right-to-try laws, the Ninth Circuit was told recently.

  • February 09, 2024

    Pharma Co. Beats Investor Suit Over Licensing Agreement

    A New York federal judge has dismissed a proposed investor class action against pharmaceutical company Molecular Partners, ruling the plaintiff failed to show the company misled investors about its progress in the development of a cancer treatment.

  • February 09, 2024

    3rd Circ. Won't Revive Fired Officer's Infertility Leave Bias Suit

    The Third Circuit on Friday backed the dismissal of a juvenile probation officer's suit claiming she was fired for requesting time off to recover from an infertility-related procedure, ruling that she hadn't put forward enough proof to disqualify the state's assertion she was fired for sloppy case filings.

Expert Analysis

  • FDA's Recent Litigation Records Are Strong, But Imperfect

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    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notched its share of litigation wins in recent years thanks to a number of key advantages, but the FDA has been less successful in certain highly visible arenas, Jonathan Berman and Colleen Heisey at Jones Day.

  • 5 Steps For Healthcare Companies After Biden's AI Order

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    Rather than simply monitoring for the issuance of agency guidelines on artificial intelligence in the wake of President Joe Biden's October executive order, health and life sciences companies should take action now and begin building internal operational and technical infrastructures designed to govern the use of AI, says Joy Sharp at Faegre Drinker.

  • Opinion

    Giving The Gov't Drug Patent March-In Authority Is Bad Policy

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    The Biden administration's recent proposal to allow government seizure of certain taxpayer-funded drug patents is a terrible idea that would negate the benefits of government-funded research, to the detriment of patients and the wider economy, says Wayne Winegarden at Pacific Research Institute.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • When Patients Have Standing For Hospital Antitrust Suits

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    Brown v. Hartford Healthcare Corp., recently decided by a Connecticut state court, provides a useful examination of how antitrust standing issues may be analyzed when patients directly sue a healthcare system for anti-competitive conduct, says Charles Honart at Stevens & Lee.

  • How AI Executive Order Aims To Compete For Foreign Talent

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    Immigration provisions within the Biden administration's executive order on artificial intelligence take a strategic approach to promoting the U.S. as a destination for AI and STEM talent by streamlining visa processing, enhancing educational and exchange programs, and improving current visa programs and pathways to permanent residency, says Eric Bord at Morgan Lewis.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Singapore

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    Singapore is keen to establish itself as a leading international financial center and a key player in the sustainable finance ecosystem, and key initiatives led by its government and other regulatory bodies have helped the Asian nation progress from its initially guarded attitude toward ESG investment and reporting, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • Navigating Asset Tracing Challenges In Bankruptcy

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    A Virginia court’s recent ruling in Health Diagnostic Laboratory Inc.'s bankruptcy highlights the heightened demand for asset tracing and the strategic use of the lowest intermediate balance rule in recovering funds from commingled accounts, says Daniel Lowenthal at Patterson Belknap.

  • Reading The Fine Print On FDA's Prescription Drug Ad Rule

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    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's new final rule regarding the disclosure of risks and side effects in ads for prescription drugs includes some broad and potentially subjective language, and some missed opportunities to address how traditional media formats have changed in recent years, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • The Basics Of Law Firm Cyber Liability Insurance Applications

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    Cyber liability insurance has become a common consideration for law firms as cyber threats have escalated, but these insurance forms can be quite complicated given the nature of the industry and associated risks, so simply filling out the form won't necessarily result in an ideal policy for your firm, says Kevin Haight at WAMS.

  • Insurance Considerations For Cos. Assessing New AI Risks

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    Because no two businesses will have the same artificial intelligence risk profile, they should consider four broad risk categories as a baseline for taking a proactive approach to guarding against AI-related exposures, say attorneys at Hunton.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • 'Patient' Definition Ruling Raises Discount Drug Questions

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    A South Carolina federal court's recent decision in Genesis Health Care v. Becerra supports a broader definition of a "patient" eligible to receive discounted drugs under the Section 340B program, but raises a host of novel questions regarding how the decision will affect covered entities and enforcement actions, say attorneys at McDermott.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

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