Hospitality

  • January 17, 2024

    SeaWorld Backs Summary Judgment To End Sesame Place Bias Suit

    Philadelphia-based theme park Sesame Place's parent company, SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment Inc., has told a Pennsylvania federal judge that summary judgment is the only option for a putative class action alleging the park's performers ignored minority children who tried to get their attention.

  • January 17, 2024

    Papa John's Trims But Can't Toss Calif. Web Tracking Suit

    Papa John's must face a trimmed putative class action alleging it illegally tracked users' online activity via its website, but the pizza chain successfully fended off a bid for injunctive relief and allegations it intercepted telephone communication, according to an order in California federal court.

  • January 17, 2024

    Trump Org. Pushes Back On Emoluments Allegations

    The Trump Organization repudiated claims by Democrats on the House Oversight Committee that former President Donald Trump's business received at least $7.8 million in foreign payments from at least 20 countries while he was in office.

  • January 17, 2024

    NM Justices Find No Authority Over Tribal Casino Injury Suits

    The New Mexico Supreme Court has ruled that a man's personal injury suit against the Pueblo of Pojoaque belongs in tribal court because shifting the jurisdiction to state court, as authorized under a gambling compact, was outlawed by a finding in another case that the federal Indian Gaming Regulatory Act does not allow such a jurisdictional change.

  • January 17, 2024

    Qdoba Strikes Deal To End Washington Pay Transparency Suit

    Qdoba has agreed to resolve a proposed class action in Washington federal court from a job applicant who alleged the fast casual Mexican restaurant chain violated Washington state's pay transparency law by failing to disclose salary information in its job postings.

  • January 17, 2024

    Atlanta Strip Club Sued Again Over Alleged Wage Theft

    An Atlanta strip club has been hit with another putative class suit alleging it stole waitresses' tips, paid servers an illegal subminimum wage and evaded recordkeeping mandates.

  • January 17, 2024

    High Court Majority Shows No Eagerness To Overturn Chevron

    U.S. Supreme Court justices on Wednesday appeared split about whether decades-old precedent that favors federal agencies' legal interpretations in rulemaking infringes on judges' rightful authority to decide questions of law.

  • January 16, 2024

    Calif. Mall Beats Suit Over Man Injured By Falling Person

    A Glendale shopping center can't be held liable for injuries a pedestrian suffered when a teenager who leaped from the mall's multistory parking garage landed on him, a California state appeals court has ruled, saying the trial judge was correct in calling the event unforeseeable due to the lack of recorded suicide attempts.

  • January 16, 2024

    6 Opinions To Read Before High Court's Chevron Arguments

    The U.S. Supreme Court will consider Wednesday whether to overturn a decades-old doctrine that instructs courts to defer to federal agencies' interpretations of ambiguous statutes, arguments in which nearly two dozen of the justices' prior writings may be used to persuade them to toss the controversial court precedent.

  • January 16, 2024

    Embattled Burger Chain Not Paying Property Taxes, Suit Says

    A beleaguered burger chain grappling with frozen assets stemming from healthcare fraud charges against a businessman is now facing a civil suit by a landlord claiming it hasn't paid property taxes on or properly maintained a few locations in Michigan. 

  • January 16, 2024

    Wyndham Earns Default Win In Timeshare Suit, Judge Says

    Wyndham Vacation Ownership Inc. should be granted a default win in its suit accusing multiple companies of charging unnecessary fees to help customers exit their timeshares, a Florida federal magistrate judge said, noting that one company failed to respond.

  • January 16, 2024

    Conn. Judge Doubts Common Law Allows Wine Tasting Death Suit

    A Connecticut state court judge on Tuesday appeared skeptical of a lawsuit by the estate of a restaurant employee who died in a car crash after a "mandatory" wine tasting, questioning whether exceptions in workers' compensation and dram shop statutes made it impossible for common-law claims to move forward.

  • January 16, 2024

    Marriott Says Former Foreign Intern Can't Prove Forced Labor

    Marriott International Inc. has urged a Colorado federal judge to toss a Mexican citizen's proposed class action accusing the company of exploiting foreign interns for cheap labor at its St. Regis Hotel in Aspen, saying he lodged nothing but "bald accusations."

  • January 16, 2024

    Judge Nixes Six Flags Suit After Finding No Skadden Conflict

    A Texas federal judge has dismissed with prejudice a shareholder derivative suit against Six Flags' board of directors over the company's failed attempt to expand amusement parks into China, saying the shareholder's argument that conflicted counsel advised the board is without merit.

  • January 16, 2024

    Panda Restaurant Group Atty Rejoins Fisher Phillips In LA

    An in-house attorney for Panda Restaurant Group Inc. has returned to international labor and employment firm Fisher Phillips after two years, the firm said Tuesday.

  • January 16, 2024

    Trump Gag Order Not Constitutional Issue, NY Top Court Says

    New York's top appellate court on Tuesday rejected Donald Trump's initial challenge to gag orders issued during the state attorney general's civil fraud case that limited his ability to comment on court staff, ruling that the former president failed to raise a "substantial constitutional question."

  • January 16, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Delaware's Court of Chancery tuned in to several music-related disputes last week, with two settlements involving Sirius XM and a new case over the late musician Prince's estate. Other litigation related to various ventures focused on house-flipping, house-cleaning, home-building, funerals and hospital workers' scrubs.

  • January 16, 2024

    Travel-Focused PE Shop Clinches $1.26B Private Credit Fund

    Travel- and leisure-focused private equity firm KSL Capital Partners LLC, advised by Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP, on Tuesday announced that it has completed fundraising for its latest private equity fund after securing $1.26 billion of commitments from partners.

  • January 16, 2024

    High Court Won't Review Rabobank Chicken Price-Fixing Win

    The U.S. Supreme Court refused on Tuesday to review contentions from chicken buyers that a lower court was wrong to toss their claims that Rabobank helped orchestrate an industrywide price-fixing scheme.

  • January 12, 2024

    Reality Star Lisa Vanderpump Faces Fired Bartenders' Suit

    Reality TV star and former "The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills" cast member Lisa Vanderpump has been sued in California court by a couple of bartenders who worked for her and her husband at one of their posh West Hollywood eateries — until the duo complained about substandard work conditions.

  • January 12, 2024

    NLRB Wants Starbucks To Rehire Fired Union Supporters

    A regional director of the National Labor Relations Board called on a Michigan federal judge Friday to order the immediate rehiring of two fired Starbucks workers, arguing there was cause to believe that the firings were retaliatory and would chill workers' willingness to organize.

  • January 12, 2024

    NC Resort Says Energy Co. Can't Dig Up Trees For Pipeline

    A North Carolina resort owner has told the state appeals court that an energy company cannot remove trees on its property, saying a lower court got it wrong when it only granted the resort partial summary judgment and a jury trial was held on that erroneous premise.

  • January 12, 2024

    2nd Circ. Judge Blasts 'Messy' Agency Rulings Amid Cruise Case

    Government agency findings are never entirely right and never entirely wrong, a Second Circuit judge griped Friday while covering an administrative law case concerning a Connecticut company's challenge to a Mississippi River charter granted to European cruise line operator Viking Cruises Ltd.

  • January 12, 2024

    Boulder Says Airbnb Agreed To Collect Taxes In Fee Spat

    A Colorado city is arguing Airbnb agreed to "assume the duties of a tax collector" on behalf of hosts under a 2016 agreement and can't get out of paying more than $415,000 in taxes on guest fees, according to the city's brief urging a state judge to uphold the tax bill.

  • January 12, 2024

    Justices Take Up Starbucks' NLRB Injunction Challenge

    The U.S. Supreme Court is poised to standardize the circuit courts' approach to vetting National Labor Relations Board injunction bids after accepting on Jan. 12 Starbucks' challenge to a Sixth Circuit ruling upholding an order to rehire seven fired workers.

Expert Analysis

  • Perspectives

    A Judge's Pitch To Revive The Jury Trial

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    Ohio state Judge Pierre Bergeron explains how the decline of the jury trial threatens public confidence in the judiciary and even democracy as a whole, and he offers ideas to restore this sacred right.

  • How To Recognize And Recover From Lawyer Loneliness

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    Law can be one of the loneliest professions, but there are practical steps that attorneys and their managers can take to help themselves and their peers improve their emotional health, strengthen their social bonds and protect their performance, says psychologist and attorney Traci Cipriano.

  • Opinion

    Litigation Funding Disclosure Should Be Mandatory

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    Despite the Appellate Rules Committee's recent deferral of the issue of requiring third-party litigation funding disclosure, such a mandate is necessary to ensure the even-handed administration of justice across all cases, says David Levitt at Hinshaw.

  • Recalling USWNT's Legal PR Playbook Amid World Cup Bid

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    As the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team strives to take home another World Cup trophy, their 2022 pay equity settlement with the U.S. Soccer Federation serves as a good reminder that winning in the court of public opinion can be more powerful than a victory inside the courtroom, says Hector Valle at Vianovo.

  • The Issues Brewing Around Starbucks Labor Practice Cases

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    Starbucks is faced with fighting off another push for a nationwide injunction against firing any employees that support unionization, and there's a distinct possibility that the company and the National Labor Relations Board could be fighting the same fight over and over in various locations, says Janette Levey at Levey Law.

  • Investors With ESG Aims Should Heed Antitrust Reporting Rules

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    As investors globally are embracing environmental, social and governance investing, regulatory agencies have made clear that ESG initiatives are not immune from antitrust scrutiny, and investors cannot count on receiving special exemptions from the Hart-Scott-Rodino Act reporting requirements, say Jonathan Gleklen and Francesca Pisano at Arnold & Porter.

  • Perspectives

    Mallory Gives Plaintiffs A Better Shot At Justice

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    Critics of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern claim it opens the door to litigation tourism, but the ruling simply gives plaintiffs more options — enabling them to seek justice against major corporations in the best possible court, say Rayna Kessler and Ethan Seidenberg at Robins Kaplan.

  • Why Seminole Tribe Sports Betting Ruling Is A Net Positive

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    The D.C. Circuit Court’s recent ruling that a gambling compact between Florida and the Seminole Tribe is lawful even though it allows for online sports betting expands the tribe's offerings while maintaining exclusivity and is a win for individuals who wish to legally wager on sports within Florida, says Daniel McGinn at Dean Mead.

  • Courts Can Overturn Deficient State Regulations, Too

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    While suits challenging federal regulations have become commonplace, such cases against state agencies are virtually nonexistent, but many states have provisions that allow litigants to bring suit for regulations with inadequate cost-benefit analyses, says Reeve Bull at the Virginia Office of Regulatory Management.

  • Equinox Bias Verdict Shows Swift Employer Response Is Key

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    A nearly $11.3 million jury verdict against Equinox in New York federal court shows just how high the stakes are for employers dealing with harassment and discrimination in the workplace, and how important consistent investigation and discipline are when responding to individual internal complaints, says Jennifer Huelskamp at Porter Wright.

  • Tales From The Trenches Of Remote Depositions

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    As practitioners continue to conduct depositions remotely in the post-pandemic world, these virtual environments are rife with opportunities for improper behavior such as witness coaching, scripted testimony and a general lack of civility — but there are methods to prevent and combat these behaviors, say Jennifer Gibbs and Bennett Moss at Zelle.

  • ChatGPT Can't Predict The Future Of Antitrust And AI (Yet)

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    Though OpenAI's ChatGPT has made artificial intelligence a popular topic of conversation recently, the subject of AI and antitrust has been around for years, raising the question of what other competitive concerns might arise as the technology becomes more sophisticated and ubiquitous in our marketplace, say attorneys at Faegre Drinker.

  • Level Up Lawyers' Business Development With Gamification

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    With employee engagement at a 10-year low in the U.S., there are several gamification techniques marketing and business development teams at law firms can use to make generating new clients and matters more appealing to lawyers, says Heather McCullough at Society 54.

  • Mallory Ruling Leaves Personal Jurisdiction Deeply Unsettled

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    In Mallory v. Norfolk Southern Railway, a closely divided U.S. Supreme Court recently rolled back key aspects of its 2017 opinion in Daimler AG v. Bauman that limited personal jurisdiction, leaving as many questions for businesses as it answers, say John Cerreta and James Rotondo at Day Pitney.

  • 5 Ways Firms Can Rethink Office Design In A Hybrid World

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    As workplaces across the country adapt to flexible work, law firms must prioritize individuality, amenities and technology in office design, says Kristin Cerutti at Nelson Worldwide.

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