Illinois

  • February 23, 2024

    Homebuyers' NAR Antitrust Claims Still Fail, Ill. Judge Says

    An Illinois federal judge has again axed federal antitrust claims brought by a proposed class of homebuyers challenging the National Association of Realtors' commission rules, while allowing some of the new state law claims to move forward.

  • February 23, 2024

    Walgreens Investors Near Deal In Suit Over Opioid Epidemic

    An Illinois federal judge agreed Friday to maintain a stay in a stockholder derivative suit accusing Walgreens and its leadership of failing to limit retail pharmacies from dispensing unreasonable amounts of opioids, a day after the parties announced an agreement in principle to resolve their dispute.

  • February 23, 2024

    Dickinson Wright Pulls In IP Atty From Steptoe

    Dickinson Wright PLLC continues to expand its intellectual property team, adding a new member to its Chicago office from Steptoe LLP.

  • February 23, 2024

    Judge Nixes Walmart 'Raw Honey' False Ad Class Action

    A Chicago federal judge granted dismissal of a proposed class action against Walmart alleging its "raw honey" and "organic raw honey" were falsely branded, saying there were no allegations about what the lead plaintiff believed when he bought the products, or what a reasonable consumer would believe.

  • February 23, 2024

    Insurance M&A Partner From Sidley Joins Kirkland

    Kirkland & Ellis LLP has added a corporate partner in its insurance transactions and regulatory and financial institutions practice groups, bringing on a former Sidley Austin LLP attorney who said he "couldn't be more excited" to join the firm's Chicago office.

  • February 23, 2024

    Ex-Major Lindsey Worker Fights Arbitration In Sex Assault Suit

    The trustee for a former Major Lindsey & Africa employee pursuing a negligence suit in New York state court against the firm tied to a reported sexual assault has filed an opposition to the legal recruiting giant's motion to compel arbitration, arguing that it disregarded "the seismic shift in the law against forced arbitration."

  • February 22, 2024

    CVS Says Redbox Won't Remove Kiosks Despite Expired Deal

    Pharmacy chain CVS filed a lawsuit against Redbox in Illinois state court Wednesday alleging the DVD rental company has refused to remove its kiosks from 10 CVS stores across the country after their deal expired, and is seeking over $424,000 in unpaid commissions and the removal of the kiosks.

  • February 22, 2024

    YouTube Privacy Judge 'Flummoxed' By Kids' Liability Theory

    A California federal judge indicated Thursday that she's open to trimming a revived proposed class action alleging Google and companies that host child-friendly YouTube channels illegally collected children's data from targeted ads, expressing concerns about the requested relief and saying she's "flummoxed" by the consumers' belated liability theory against the channels' owners.

  • February 22, 2024

    R. Kelly Fights Chicago Child Porn Conviction At 7th Circ.

    R. Kelly's bid to unwind his conviction and 20-year sentence on child pornography and inducement charges received skepticism Thursday from one Seventh Circuit judge, who at one point warned the artist could be "worse off" by winning his appeal.

  • February 22, 2024

    Instant Brands Ch. 11 Plan Gets OK After Win In Supplier Row

    A Texas bankruptcy judge on Thursday gave tentative approval to home-appliance maker Instant Brands' reorganization plan after finding that recent briefings from the company and a supplier supported his preliminary decision last week to preserve the debtor's indemnification rights.

  • February 22, 2024

    Convicted Chicago Pol Seeks Acquittal Or New Trial

    One of Chicago's longest serving and most powerful local politicians asked an Illinois federal judge Wednesday to set aside a jury's December verdict convicting him of using his official position to steer tax business to his personal law firm, saying no rational jury could have convicted him based on the evidence presented at trial.

  • February 22, 2024

    Locke Lord Settles Failed Health Plan Malpractice Suit

    Locke Lord LLP has reached a settlement to resolve a health plan fiduciary's malpractice suit alleging the firm provided bad legal advice that doomed the plan, permanently ending an Illinois federal suit first filed in 2018.

  • February 22, 2024

    Taft Stettinius Adds 6 Dinsmore Attys In Detroit, Chicago

    Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP has hired six attorneys from Dinsmore & Shohl LLP who focus their practices on business law and litigation matters.

  • February 22, 2024

    GAO Backs VA's Need For Licensed Contractor

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office backed the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs' requirement for an Illinois company to be licensed in Oregon for a security guard service deal in the state, rejecting the company's contention that the requirement unduly restricted competition.

  • February 21, 2024

    Ill. Court Vacates R. Kelly Victim's $4M Default Judgment

    An Illinois appellate court has thrown out a $4 million default judgment won by a woman who claimed jailed former R&B star R. Kelly physically and sexually abused her, saying certain procedural rules were not appropriately followed. 

  • February 21, 2024

    Judge Won't Strike 'Excessive' $2.3M Tobacco TM Verdict

    A federal judge in Atlanta has said he won't reduce a $2.3 million verdict against two Georgia wholesalers of cigarette rolling paper accused of selling knockoffs, saying the jury's determination on the amount of the damages is "something the court cannot second-guess."

  • February 21, 2024

    Justices Squabble Over Emergency Review Of EPA Smog Plan

    The U.S. Supreme Court's liberal wing denounced during oral argument Wednesday their colleagues' decision to consider the merits of four related emergency requests to prevent the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from implementing a plan to reduce cross-state pollution without first getting lower court input.

  • February 21, 2024

    7th Circ. Says Excavator's Kickback Appeal Doesn't Add Up

    A Seventh Circuit panel seemed unconvinced Wednesday by a former excavation company employee seeking to overturn his kickback conviction, with one judge suggesting he had two unpersuasive arguments and was trying to make "0 + 0 = 1."

  • February 21, 2024

    Irish Pub Chain's Ex-CFO Gets 1.5 Years For $1M Tax Fraud

    The former chief financial officer of a pub chain with more than a dozen Irish-themed restaurants was sentenced to one and a half years in prison Wednesday by an Ohio federal court for his role in a bookkeeping scheme that defrauded eight states of $1 million in sales taxes.

  • February 21, 2024

    CoStar, Hotel Giants Accused Of Data-Driven Price-Fixing

    Hilton, Hyatt and other big name hotel operators are the target of a proposed class action alleging they colluded with hospitality industry analytics firm CoStar Group Inc. to fix prices in luxury hotel markets in Seattle and other major U.S. cities, according to a suit filed in Washington federal court.

  • February 21, 2024

    Appliance Parts Maker Can Mediate Creditor Suits In Ch. 11

    A Texas bankruptcy judge on Wednesday granted an appliance components producer's request in its Chapter 11 case to engage in mediation with Invesco, a lender group and other parties to address "significant issues" tied to two lawsuits brought against the company last year.

  • February 21, 2024

    Collector Gets 'One Final Shot' To Pay Famed Artist's Estate

    An Illinois federal judge on Wednesday reinstated a lawsuit claiming a collector infringed the copyright of the late Chicago photographer Vivian Maier, giving the collector until June to pay Maier's estate as agreed in a 2020 settlement of the case.

  • February 21, 2024

    Miner Barnhill Vet Among Biden's Latest Judicial Picks

    President Joe Biden announced five judicial nominees on Wednesday to serve on the Seventh Circuit as well as on district courts in Illinois, Arizona and the District of Columbia.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ill. Public Defender Sues Over Display Of Israeli Army Photo

    An Illinois public defender filed a First Amendment lawsuit against her county employer after she was reprimanded for a photograph of her holding a gun in front of an Israeli flag that she displayed in an office area in response to the Oct. 7 Hamas terrorist attack in Israel.

  • February 20, 2024

    Chicago Sues Oil Giants, Alleging Climate Change Deception

    The city of Chicago hit BP, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, ExxonMobil, Shell and the oil and gas industry's largest trade association with a lawsuit Tuesday, alleging their involvement in a decadeslong "campaign of deception" to increase consumption of fossil fuels to boost profits, despite their knowledge that their products cause environmental harm.

Expert Analysis

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • How States Vary On The Fireman's Rule And Its Applicability

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    A recent decision by the Indiana Court of Appeals, reviving a firefighter’s suit, is illustrative of changes in the application and interpretation by state courts and legislatures of the Fireman’s Rule, which bans first responders from recovering for injuries sustained on the job, says Shea Feagin at Swift Currie.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • 11 Noteworthy CFPB Developments From 2023

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    Under Rohit Chopra’s leadership, 2023 was an industrious year for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, with developments including the release of the proposed personal financial data rights rule, publication of proposed rules involving public registries for nonbanks and the bureau's continuous battle against junk fees, all of which are sure to further progress in 2024, say attorneys at Husch Blackwell.

  • 3 Areas Of Focus In Congressional Crosshairs This Year

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    Companies must prepare for Congress to build on its 2023 oversight priorities this year, continuing its vigorous inquiries into Chinese company-related investments, workplace safety and labor relations issues, and generative artificial intelligence, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Perspectives

    Justices May Clarify Expert Witness Confrontation Confusion

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    After oral arguments in Smith v. Arizona, the U.S. Supreme Court seems poised to hold that expert witness opinions that rely on out-of-court testimonial statements for their factual basis are unconstitutional, thus resolving some of the complications created by the court’s confrontation clause jurisprudence, says Richard Friedman at the University of Michigan Law School.

  • 5 Trade Secret Developments To Follow In 2024

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    Recent cases and trends in trade secret law indicate that significant developments are likely this year, and practitioners should be anticipating their impact on the business and legal landscape, say attorneys at Faegre Drinker.

  • What's On Tap For Public Corruption Prosecutions In 2024

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    All signs point toward another year of blockbuster public corruption prosecutions in 2024, revealing broader trends in enforcement and jurisprudence, and promising valuable lessons for defense strategy, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

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    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

  • 7 E-Discovery Predictions For 2024 And Beyond

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    The legal and technical issues of e-discovery now affect virtually every lawsuit, and in the year to come, practitioners can expect practices and policies to evolve in a number of ways, from the expanded use of relevancy redactions to mandated information security provisions in protective orders, say attorneys at Littler.

  • A Closer Look At The Federal Criminal Enforcement Slump

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    Former Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, now at King & Spalding, explains that the U.S. Department of Justice’s statistical reports reveal that federal authorities are considerably less productive today than in the past, as criminal prosecutions fell in 2022 in every major category, for reasons that are not entirely clear.

  • 5 Litigation Funding Trends To Note In 2024

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    Over the next year and beyond, litigation funding will continue to evolve in ways that affect attorneys and the larger litigation landscape, from the growth of a secondary market for funded claims, to rising interest rates restricting the availability of capital, says Jeffery Lula at GLS Capital.

  • Ill. Justices Set New Standard For Analyzing Defect Claims

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    The Illinois Supreme Court's recent ruling in Acuity v. M/I Homes of Chicago has effectively changed the landscape for how insurers may respond to construction defect claims in the state, so insurers should carefully focus their coverage analysis on whether the business risk exclusions are applicable, say Bevin Carroll and Julie Klein at Kennedys.

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