Illinois

  • January 24, 2024

    Bid To Swap Chevron For An Old Standby Raises Doubts

    Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court debated whether a World War II-era doctrine encouraging courts to strongly consider agency statutory interpretations could replace the court's controversial so-called Chevron doctrine that requires judges to defer to those interpretations if a statute is ambiguous.

  • January 24, 2024

    7th Circ. Ponders If Faulty Steel Damaged O'Hare Project

    The Seventh Circuit questioned Wednesday whether cracked welds in a Chicago O'Hare International Airport canopy damaged the larger structure in a way that would trigger property damage coverage, after a lower court ruled that the canopy's general contractor wasn't covered for over $37.5 million in costs.

  • January 24, 2024

    Ex-Union Fund Trustees Ask 7th Circ. To Undo DOL Takeover

    The Seventh Circuit should reverse the U.S. Department of Labor's preliminary injunction win that put an independent fiduciary in charge of a multiemployer benefit fund at the center of mismanagement claims, former trustees contended, saying a lower court doesn't have jurisdiction.

  • January 24, 2024

    Software Co. Says Data Breach Victims Aren't Customers

    NextGen Healthcare is asking a Georgia federal court to dismiss a proposed consolidated class action because the plaintiffs don't have a relationship with the software company that would make it liable for damages, even as it acknowledged their health information was compromised by a cyberattack. 

  • January 24, 2024

    Orrick Brings In First-Chair IP Trial Lawyer From Venable

    Timothy Carroll joined Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP as a partner and first-chair intellectual property trial lawyer from Venable LLP on Wednesday, bringing his expertise in federal court and U.S. International Trade Commission trials to the firm's IP litigation practice, Orrick said.

  • January 24, 2024

    $15M Bayer Deal Gets Early Nod, But Fees Concern Judge

    An Illinois federal judge on Wednesday gave his initial signoff to a $15 million deal in multidistrict litigation claiming Bayer and other companies behind Seresto flea and tick collars unlawfully failed to warn consumers that their pets could experience serious adverse effects, but questioned the awards sought by the lead plaintiffs and class counsel.

  • January 24, 2024

    Trader's Fraud Caused Broker-Dealer's Collapse, Jury Hears

    A now-defunct Atlanta broker-dealer's former head of fixed income trading caused the firm to bleed money and eventually go under by engaging in several years of bond trading activity that he himself described as fraudulent, a federal prosecutor told an Illinois jury Wednesday.

  • January 24, 2024

    7th Circ. Says More Info Needed In Samsung Battery Suit

    The Seventh Circuit on Wednesday sent back to district court a suit against South Korea-based Samsung SDI Co. Ltd. over an exploding battery, saying discovery is needed to determine whether the Indiana federal court has jurisdiction over the company.

  • January 24, 2024

    7th Circ. Judges Question Racism Claims Of Indy TV Network

    Judges on the Seventh Circuit seemed unpersuaded Wednesday that DirecTV and Dish Network discriminated against a Black-owned television company during retransmission negotiations, the core allegation of cases that Circle City Broadcasting lost in summary judgments last year.

  • January 24, 2024

    Hospital's $55M Deal To End 16-Year Antitrust Case Gets OK

    An Illinois federal judge granted initial approval Wednesday to a $55 million settlement by NorthShore University HealthSystem, resolving a 16-year-old antitrust class action over alleged price hikes the health system instituted following a merger in 2000 with Highland Park Hospital.

  • January 24, 2024

    Seyfarth Starts Restructuring Practice, Adds 3 BCLP Partners

    Seyfarth Shaw LLP announced Wednesday that three former Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP partners have joined the firm, two of them to launch its restructuring and insolvency practice.

  • January 23, 2024

    Trans Health Class Win Stayed For Insurer's 9th Circ. Appeal

    A Washington federal court entered judgment in favor of a certified class of transgender health plan participants who alleged that Blue Cross Blue Shield of Illinois discriminated against them by denying gender-affirming care. However, the judge agreed to stay the ruling pending the outcome of an appeal to the Ninth Circuit.

  • January 23, 2024

    ​​​​​​​'Two-Step' Bankruptcies Abuse Law, AGs Tell Justices

    Attorneys general from 24 states and the District of Columbia told the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday that divisional mergers that manufacture jurisdiction for bankruptcy purposes shouldn't be allowed, writing in an amicus brief that Georgia-Pacific asbestos unit Bestwall employed the tactic to shield the parent from liability.

  • January 23, 2024

    Ex-Financial Adviser Cops To A $1.5M Movie Fraud Side Hustle

    A former Citigroup and Wells Fargo financial adviser admitted in Illinois federal court Tuesday that she swindled clients, some of whom were elderly, out of nearly $1.5 million by soliciting their investment for purported movie productions.

  • January 23, 2024

    Chicago Must Face Sex Bias Suit Over Paramedic Fitness Test

    The City of Chicago can't dodge a lawsuit alleging it used a physical abilities test to prevent women from graduating from its paramedic training academy, an Illinois judge ruled, saying jurors need to sort out whether the city used the test to cull an influx of female trainees.

  • January 23, 2024

    Norton Rose Fulbright Projects Atty To Co-Lead Chicago Team

    After nearly tripling its attorney headcount since opening in 2022, Norton Rose Fulbright's Chicago office has gained another leader in one of its project attorneys, the firm said Tuesday.

  • January 23, 2024

    2nd Circ. Backs Shkreli Lifetime Pharma Industry Ban

    The Second Circuit on Tuesday backed a ruling banning former pharmaceutical executive and convicted securities fraudster Martin Shkreli from the drug industry for life, saying a repeat of his past misconduct would be "life-threatening."

  • January 22, 2024

    Pritzker Heir, Firm Move $25M Sex Assault Suit To SDNY

    An heir to the Pritzker family fortune and his personal investment office on Friday removed from New York state court to federal court a $25 million suit that claims that he sexually assaulted a woman while she was incapacitated in Manhattan in 2009.

  • January 22, 2024

    Eufy Avoids Part Of Facial Data Privacy Suit

    An Illinois federal judge has pared down a proposed class privacy suit targeting security camera brand Eufy, limiting both the number and scope of claims accusing the camera maker of engaging in "corporate voyeurism" by storing consumers' facial recognition data.

  • January 22, 2024

    Sex Toy Patent Owner's Arguments Fail To Satisfy PTAB

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board has found that all challenged claims of Shenzhen Svakom Technology's patent for interactive sex toys are invalid, as they rely too much on earlier inventions and would be anticipated and obvious.

  • January 22, 2024

    Stump Grinder Co. Sued After Fla. Man's Leg Mangled

    A Florida man has sued an Illinois-based agricultural equipment company and a Miami rental shop in state court, saying his leg was "ground apart" after getting stuck in a stump grinder due to an inoperative auto-turnoff safety feature that caused the machine to continue running.

  • January 22, 2024

    7th Circ. Says Judge's Criticism Of Atty Isn't Up For Appeal

    A California attorney won't get to overturn a district court order pulling his admission in a products liability case and condemning him for making false statements because the parties settled, resolving all issues, before the attorney appealed, a Seventh Circuit panel ruled Monday.

  • January 22, 2024

    Teamsters Fund Prevails In $190K Pension Fight With Univar

    An Illinois federal judge on Monday found Univar Solutions is still on the hook to pay $190,000 to a Teamsters pension fund, ruling a pair of letters the company cited did not prove the parties had severed a collective bargaining agreement containing pension obligations.

  • January 22, 2024

    City's Firefighter Test Doesn't Flout Title VII, 7th Circ. Says

    The Seventh Circuit refused Monday to upend Madison, Wisconsin's win over a lawsuit alleging its physical fitness test for firefighter applicants eliminates women at a higher rate than men, backing a lower court's finding that an alternative examination didn't fit the city's needs.

  • January 22, 2024

    Ill. Woman Ruled Unfit For Trial Over Barron Trump Threats

    A Florida federal judge has ruled that an Illinois woman is incompetent to stand trial after she threatened to shoot former President Donald Trump and his 17-year-old son Barron, ordering that she be committed to a psychiatric hospital for restorative treatment.

Expert Analysis

  • Checking In On How SuperValu Has Altered FCA Litigation

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    Four months after the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in U.S. ex rel. Chutte v. SuperValu, the decision's reach may be more limited than initially anticipated, with the expansion of the scienter standard counterbalanced by some potential defense tools for defendants, say Elena Quattrone and Olivia Plinio at Epstein Becker.

  • 7th Circ. Ruling May Steer ADA Toward Commuter Issues

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    Employers faced with commuting-accommodation requests from employees who do not require on-site modifications under the Americans with Disabilities Act should consider the Seventh Circuit's recent reopening of a lawsuit alleging unlawful refusal of a night-vision-challenged worker's request to extend a shift change, says Robin Shea at Constangy.

  • Series

    Participating In Living History Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My role as a baron in a living history group, and my work as volunteer corporate counsel for a book series fan association, has provided me several opportunities to practice in unexpected areas of law — opening doors to experiences that have nurtured invaluable personal and professional skills, says Matthew Parker at the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services.

  • Opinion

    Private Equity Owners Can Remedy Law Firms' Agency Issues

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    Nonlawyer, private-equity ownership of law firms can benefit shareholders and others vulnerable to governance issues such as disparate interests, and can in turn help resolve agency problems, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

  • How To Protect Atty-Client Privilege While Using Generative AI

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    When using generative artificial intelligence tools, attorneys should consider several safeguards to avoid breaches or complications in attorney-client privilege, say Antonious Sadek and Christopher Campbell at DLA Piper.

  • Opinion

    Design And Utility Patents Should Get Same Obviousness Test

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    The principles of the U.S. Supreme Court's KSR v. Teleflex decision should apply to design patents in the pending Federal Circuit LKQ v. GM Global Technology case because both utility and design patents are subject to the same prohibition against obviousness, say Alexander Chen and Katja Grosch at InHouse Co. Law Firm.

  • What FERC-PJM Negotiations Mean For The Energy Industry

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    Following the aftermath of Winter Storm Elliot, disputes associated with the PJM Interconnection settlement negotiations taking place at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission have brought to the fore a potential legal minefield arising out of extreme weather events that could lead to commercial risks for power generating companies, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • Kentucky Tax Talk: Taking Up The Dormant Commerce Clause

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    Attorneys at Frost Brown examine whether the U.S. Supreme Court is likely to review Foresight Coal Sales v. Kent Chandler to consider whether a Kentucky utility rate law discriminates against interstate commerce, and how the decision may affect dormant commerce clause jurisprudence.

  • How New Lawyers Can Leverage Feedback For Growth

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    Embracing constructive criticism as a tool for success can help new lawyers accelerate their professional growth and law firms build a culture of continuous improvement, says Katie Aldrich at Fringe Professional Development.

  • Takeaways From Recent Developments In Bank-Fintech Space

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    Several recent consumer protection advancements affecting banks, technology and fintech companies, including the issuance of final regulatory guidance relating to third-party risk management, reemphasize the importance of closely assessing true lender issues in bank-fintech partnership arrangements, says Eamonn Moran at Norton Rose.

  • Developers Are Testing Defenses In Generative AI Litigation

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    In the rapidly growing field of generative artificial intelligence law in the U.S., there are a few possible defenses that have already been effectively asserted by defendants in litigation, including lack of standing, reliance on the fair use doctrine, and the legality of so-called data scraping, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • Twitter Legal Fees Suit Offers Crash Course In Billing Ethics

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    X Corp.'s suit alleging that Wachtell grossly inflated its fees in the final days of Elon Musk’s Twitter acquisition provides a case study in how firms should protect their reputations by hewing to ethical billing practices and the high standards for professional conduct that govern attorney-client relationships, says Lourdes Fuentes at Karta Legal.

  • Amgen-Horizon Deal May Signal FTC's Return To Bargaining

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    The Federal Trade Commission's recent settlement of its challenge to Amgen's proposed acquisition of Horizon Therapeutics marks the latest in a string of midlitigation settlements, and may signal that competition regulators are more inclined toward such negotiations following recent litigation losses, say attorneys at Freshfields.

  • ABA's Money-Laundering Resolution Is A Balancing Act

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    While the American Bar Association’s recently passed resolution recognizes a lawyer's duty to discontinue representation that could facilitate money laundering and other fraudulent activity, it preserves, at least for now, the delicate balance of judicial, state-based regulation of the legal profession and the sanctity of the attorney-client relationship, say attorneys at Ballard Spahr.

  • FTC Settlements Widen Efforts To Shield Health Data

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    The Federal Trade Commission's recent enforcement actions aim to send a clear message that companies using tracking technologies should carefully monitor the sharing of sensitive data, particularly in the mental health, substance use disorder treatment and reproductive health care fields, say attorneys at Choate.

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