Immigration

  • February 20, 2024

    Farms Say Workers Haven't Tied Them To Abusive Tactics

    Two agricultural companies look to escape claims that they trafficked a group of migrant workers, telling a Michigan federal court that the workers hadn't shown how they could have known that a recruiter used abusive tactics to obtain their labor.

  • February 20, 2024

    Developers Deny 'Shell Game' Amid Push For More Sanctions

    Real estate developers facing potential imprisonment over their failure to pay EB-5 investors at least $26 million in settlement and sanction judgments have told an Illinois federal court their money is not hidden in a "shell game" but rather tied up in receivership proceedings the investors already know about.

  • February 20, 2024

    Restoration Architect Says Visa Denial Ignored Evidence

    A Colombian restoration architect who wants to address the affordable housing shortage in the U.S., accused immigration officials in Florida federal court of disregarding more than 1,000 pages of evidence in denying him a national interest waiver for a visa.

  • February 20, 2024

    Permanent Need Dooms Request For H-2B Home Health Aides

    A U.S. Department of Labor appeals board has upheld the rejection of a business's request to hire four home health aides under the H-2B temporary foreign worker program, determining a certifying officer did not act arbitrarily and capriciously in finding the company failed to show its need for workers was temporary.

  • February 20, 2024

    Lack Of Evidence Kills Biz Group's Bid To Hire Foreign Janitors

    A U.S. Department of Labor appeals board shot down a Las Vegas-based Hispanic business group's bid to hire 100 foreign janitors to work during its event season, saying the group failed to hand over evidence to back its seasonal need.

  • February 20, 2024

    GOP Sens. Seek Full Impeachment Trial For Mayorkas

    A group of Senate Republicans made the case on Tuesday that their constitutional duty compels them to hold a full impeachment trial for Alejandro Mayorkas, secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, despite reservations from other Republicans in the Democrat-led Senate.

  • February 16, 2024

    Texas County Says State's Migrant Arrest Law Will Raise Costs

    Texas' Harris County urged a federal court to grant the Biden administration's bid to block an impending state law that would allow Texas to arrest and deport migrants, saying the law, if enforced, would lead to increased jail-related costs.

  • February 16, 2024

    DOL Faulted For Not Explaining Ala. Sonic's H-2B Visa Denial

    A U.S. Department of Labor appeals board has given the operator of an Alabama Sonic Drive-In another chance at temporarily hiring foreign cooks to help out in warm months, ruling that a certifying officer denied an application for the H-2B visa program without a satisfactory explanation.

  • February 16, 2024

    Union Can't Intervene In Fight Over NY Farm Laborers Law

    The United Farm Workers can't intervene in a case over a state law covering protections for agricultural workers, a New York federal judge ruled Friday, saying the union's interests in organizing and upholding the statute won't be harmed.

  • February 16, 2024

    House Lawmakers Unveil $66.3B Military, Border Bill

    A bipartisan group of U.S. House of Representatives lawmakers introduced legislation on Friday that would provide $66.32 billion to support Ukraine, Israel and Taiwan, as well as enact border reforms.

  • February 16, 2024

    Green Card Approvals Sink To All Time Low

    The United States' green card approval rate hit a historic low amid visa caps, with only 3% of those with pending green card applications on track to receive permanent residency in fiscal year 2024, the Cato Institute reported Thursday.

  • February 15, 2024

    GAO Rejects Protests Against ICE Air Charter Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office denied two protests related to the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement solicitation for air charter services for transportation of noncitizens in federal custody, according to two decisions published Thursday.

  • February 15, 2024

    Texas Migrant Arrest Law Needs 'A Lot More Care,' Judge Says

    A Texas federal judge Thursday seemed poised to block a controversial state law that would permit the state to arrest and deport migrants, telling attorneys for the state that the statute may lead to a patchwork of immigration law akin to "the kind of thing the Civil War said you can't do."

  • February 15, 2024

    HHS Watchdog Finds Lax Vetting For Migrant Kid Sponsors

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services was lackadaisical in vetting sponsors taking custody of children who migrated to the U.S. alone and did not always do timely safety checks after their release, according to a report Thursday.

  • February 15, 2024

    9th Circ. Unconvinced That Theft Doesn't Warrant Removal

    A Mexican man fighting deportation after he was convicted of robbery couldn't convince the Ninth Circuit that the state robbery law supporting his conviction was too broad to force his removal.

  • February 15, 2024

    ICE Reaches Settlement Over Mistaken Raid On Couple

    The government has reached a settlement with an elderly Boston woman and the estate of her longtime partner over a mistaken 2019 U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement raid on their apartment by agents who had the wrong address for a suspect, according to a Thursday court filing.

  • February 14, 2024

    NY Judge Sends Migrant Busing Suit Back To State Court

    A state court will hear the New York City social services commissioner's $708 million lawsuit seeking to hold charter companies liable for Texas' migrant busing policies, after a New York federal court ruled Wednesday that the case does not raise federal questions.

  • February 14, 2024

    GOP Senator Wants Confirmation Hearing On Labor Secretary

    Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., called on the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions to hold another hearing on the nomination of Julie Su to the position of secretary of labor, arguing that Su's record as acting secretary deserves public scrutiny.

  • February 14, 2024

    Investors Urge Prison As Developers Seek More Briefing Time

    Two real estate developers on Wednesday asked for more time to respond to EB-5 investors' request that they be imprisoned for hiding their money instead of paying overdue settlements and sanctions judgments, telling an Illinois federal judge their attorney wrote down the court's deadline incorrectly.

  • February 14, 2024

    House Rep. Green Plans Retirement After Mayorkas Fight

    Rep. Mark Green, R-Tenn., chair of the U.S. House Committee on Homeland Security, said Wednesday evening he will not seek reelection, an announcement that comes one day after he led the impeachment of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security secretary.

  • February 14, 2024

    DHS Warns Of Reduced Operations With Budget Shortfall

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is warning it may have to pare back border security initiatives and removal procedures, while green card and asylum backlogs worsen, if Congress doesn't provide additional funding, per a Wednesday email to Law360.

  • February 14, 2024

    Va. Farms Settle H-2A Workers' Allegations Of OT Violations

    A wage dispute lodged by two Mexican farmworkers who accused a Virginia agricultural association and two farms of cheating them and other temporary agricultural workers out of over $2.5 million in overtime pay is now settled, the parties said Wednesday.

  • February 14, 2024

    Deputy AG Warns Of Harsher Penalties For Crimes Aided By AI

    Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco on Wednesday said the U.S. Department of Justice will seek harsher penalties for crimes committed with the aid of artificial intelligence, calling the technology a "double-edged sword" that can be exploited by criminals but utilized by prosecutors with the right controls in place.

  • February 14, 2024

    DOL Extends Deadline For Input On Foreign Worker Jobs

    The U.S. Department of Labor said Wednesday that it is giving the public more time to provide comments on its plan to expand its list of occupations eligible for employment-based green cards based on domestic worker shortages.

  • February 14, 2024

    NY Immigrant Settles Green Card Case Alleging Atty Fraud

    A New York resident has reached an agreement with several immigration officials concerning the denial of his green card application on fraud grounds, which he blamed on a consultancy firm and a disbarred attorney, according to a stipulation of dismissal filed in New York federal court.

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Expert Analysis

  • Steps To Success For Senior Associates

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Adriana Paris at Rissman Barrett discusses the increased responsibilities and opportunities that becoming a senior associate brings and what attorneys in this role should prioritize to flourish in this stressful but rewarding next level in their careers.

  • Legal Profession Must Do More For Lawyers With Disabilities

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    At the start of Disability Pride month, Rosalyn Richter at Arnold & Porter looks at why lawyers with disabilities are significantly underrepresented in private practice, asserting that law firms and other employers must do more to conquer the implicit bias that deters attorneys from seeking accommodations.

  • Opinion

    Appellate Funding Disclosure: No Mandate Is Right Choice

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    The Advisory Committee on Appellate Rules' recent decision, forgoing a mandatory disclosure rule for litigation funding in federal appeals, is prudent, as third-party funding is only involved in a minuscule number of federal cases, and courts have ample authority to obtain funding information if necessary, says Stewart Ackerly at Statera Capital.

  • RETRACTED: How New Prevailing Wage Rule May Affect H-1B Employment

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    Editor's note: This guest article has been removed due to an inaccurate discussion of the status of the U.S. Department of Labor's prevailing wage rule, "Strengthening Wage Protections for the Temporary and Permanent Employment of Certain Aliens in the United States." The rule is no longer on the Biden administration's current rulemaking agenda.

  • Opinion

    Congress Should Pass Bipartisan Immigration Reform Bill

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    By reforming visa allocation, expediting asylum processing, creating new employment visas and creating a path forward for individuals lacking permanent legal status, the recently introduced Dignity Act presents an opportunity for much-needed reform and deserves support from both sides of the aisle, says Laura Reiff at Greenberg Traurig.

  • How Attys Can Avoid Exposing Their Firms To Cyberattacks

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    Attorneys are the weakest link in their firms' cyberdefenses because hackers often exploit the gap between individuals’ work and personal cybersecurity habits, but there are some steps lawyers can take to reduce the risks they create for their employers, say Mark Hurley and Carmine Cicalese at Digital Privacy & Protection.

  • Virginia 'Rocket Docket' Slowdown Is Likely A Blip

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    After being the fastest or second-fastest federal civil trial court for 14 straight years, the Eastern District of Virginia has slid to 18th place, but the rocket docket’s statistical tumble doesn't mean the district no longer maintains a speedy civil docket, says Robert Tata at Hunton.

  • 5 Management Tips To Keep Law Firm Merger Talks Moving

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    Many law firm mergers that make solid business sense still fall apart due to the costs and frustrations of inefficient negotiations, but firm managers can increase the chance of success by effectively planning and executing merger discussions, say Lisa Smith and Kristin Stark at Fairfax Associates.

  • Pay Transparency Laws Complicate Foreign Labor Cert.

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    State and local laws adopted to help close the gender pay gap pose challenges for U.S. companies recruiting foreign nationals, as they try to navigate a thicket of pay transparency laws without running afoul of federally regulated recruitment practices, say Stephanie Pimentel and Asha George at Berry Appleman.

  • Rethinking In-Office Attendance For Associate Retention

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    The hybrid office attendance model doesn't work for all employees, but it does for many — and balancing these two groups is important for associate retention and maintaining a BigLaw firm culture that supports all attorneys, says Summer Eberhard at Major Lindsey.

  • Murdaugh Trials Offer Law Firms Fraud Prevention Reminders

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    As the fraud case against Alex Murdaugh continues to play out, the evidence and narrative presented at his murder trial earlier this year may provide lessons for law firms on implementing robust internal controls that can detect and prevent similar kinds of fraud, say Travis Casner and Helga Zauner at Weaver and Tidwell.

  • Foreign Labor Certification Website Still Structurally Limited

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    Though the U.S. Department of Labor's Office of Foreign Labor Certification has shown encouraging responsiveness in correcting at least one major issue with its online portal, several sources of frustration — including employers' limited access to filed applications — still require fixing, says Michael Morton at Fakhoury Global.

  • Firm Tips For Helping New Lawyers Succeed Post-Pandemic

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    Ten steps can help firms significantly enhance the experience of attorneys who started their careers in the coronavirus pandemic era, including facilitating opportunities for cross-firm connection, which can ultimately help build momentum for business development, says Lana Manganiello at Equinox Strategy Partners.

  • Perspectives

    Immigration Board Must Mend Choice Of Law Post-Garcia

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    The Board of Immigration Appeals must revisit the choice of law standard recently established in Matter of Garcia, which fails to establish predictability, upsets the settled expectations of parties' remanded cases and unfairly tips the scale in the government's favor, says Monica Mananzan at the Capital Area Immigrants' Rights Coalition.

  • Fla. Foreign Real Estate Law Brings Broad Investment Risks

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    Last month, Florida became the latest state to enact legislation prohibiting Chinese investors from acquiring certain interests in real property, introducing significant legal uncertainty and consequences for real estate stakeholders and the private equity industry, say attorneys at Simpson Thacher.

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