Immigration

  • February 28, 2024

    Feds Fear Unlimited Discovery In Separated Families' Cases

    The Biden administration cautioned an Arizona federal judge against allowing migrant families separated under the Trump administration to obtain deposition transcripts from another family separation case, saying the request set no limits on how much more evidence could be collected.

  • February 28, 2024

    Coats Rose Atty Fired Over Threatening Letter To Judge

    The Texas law firm Coats Rose PC terminated one of its attorneys believed to have sent intimidating messages on firm letterhead to an immigration judge running for a judgeship in the 151st Civil District Court of Harris County, the firm confirmed to Law360 on Wednesday.

  • February 28, 2024

    2nd Circ. Revives Asylum Bid Over Testimony Interruption

    The Second Circuit ruled that an immigration judge wrongly faulted an asylum-seeking Eritrean man for not testifying about being tied up and left outside after being interrogated by the Eritrean military, saying the judge didn't give the man a chance to.

  • February 27, 2024

    7th Circ. Says Renewed Removal Orders Must Wait On CAT

    The 30-day deadline for people with reinstated deportation orders to go to the circuit courts begins once they've completed the agency appeals process, not when U.S. Department of Homeland Security reinstates the removal order, the Seventh Circuit said Tuesday.

  • February 27, 2024

    Texas Escapes Pregnant Worker Law But Not Migrant Funding

    A Texas federal judge on Tuesday blocked the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act from taking effect in the state, ruling that the U.S. House trampled on the U.S. Constitution's quorum requirements when it allowed some lawmakers to vote on the legislation by proxy.

  • February 27, 2024

    Ga. ICE Facility Dismissed From Forced Labor Suit

    A Georgia federal judge on Tuesday allowed an immigration detention facility to escape a proposed class action accusing it of forcing detainees to work for as little as $1 per day after it argued it couldn't be sued under Georgia law.

  • February 27, 2024

    GOP Seeks To Bar DHS From Sending Air Marshals To Border

    Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, introduced legislation on Tuesday that would bar the U.S. Department of Homeland Security from deploying federal air marshals to U.S. borders for border control unless a national immigration crisis has been declared, amid claims that the deployments are stressing resources and making it riskier to fly.

  • February 27, 2024

    Judge Pans 'Voluminous' H-2B Request With Little Explanation

    A U.S. Department of Labor judge called out a landscaping company for expecting the department to sift through 200 pages of documents in support of an application for foreign workers, saying the business should explain the relevance of the documents.

  • February 26, 2024

    Pryor Cashman Adds Immigration Atty To New York Office

    Pryor Cashman LLP added an attorney with experience handling both legal immigration matters and diversity, equity and inclusion, or DEI, efforts to its New York immigration group.

  • February 26, 2024

    Texas Brings High Court Ruling Into Border Wire Removal Suit

    The Lone Star State told the Fifth Circuit that the high court's recent, unanimous decision keeping the federal government on the hook for inaccurate credit reports undermined the Biden administration's claims that its removal of Texas' border wire was protected from court review.

  • February 26, 2024

    AILA Vows Action To Fight Potentially Illegal Asylum Policies

    The American Immigration Lawyers Association warned President Joe Biden that it stands ready to oppose any changes to asylum policy that would be beyond the president's authority and that would violate U.S. and international asylum law.

  • February 26, 2024

    GOP States, Groups Back Texas In Rio Grande Barrier Fight

    Republican-led states and conservative groups have filed briefs supporting Texas in its legal fight with the Biden administration over the 1,000-foot anti-migrant barrier in the Rio Grande, echoing the Lone Star State's argument that it has a constitutional right to defend itself from an "invasion" of migrants from Mexico.

  • February 23, 2024

    Over 150 Orgs Warn Biden Asylum Ban Would 'Stain' Legacy

    More than 150 organizations warned President Joe Biden that his administration was embracing policies that mirror those of former President Donald Trump, citing what they said has been a shift to cruel immigration policies from when Biden first took office.

  • February 23, 2024

    9th Circ. Says Asylum Rightly Denied Over UK Assault Record

    The Ninth Circuit on Friday ruled that a noncitizen was ineligible for asylum, finding reliable the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's evidence that he had sexually assaulted minors while living in the United Kingdom.

  • February 23, 2024

    ABA Report Says Electronic Monitoring Of Migrants Is Punitive

    The electronic monitoring of noncitizens by immigration authorities amounts to a form of detention that imposes a "considerable human toll" on immigrants and their families and may even violate constitutional guarantees of due process, according to a report commissioned by the American Bar Association that was released Friday.

  • February 23, 2024

    Feds Back ICE Contractor In 9th Circ. Detainee Wage Fight

    The federal government told the Ninth Circuit that immigrant detainees at contractor-run facilities aren't covered by state labor laws, backing GEO Group Inc.'s effort to overturn $23.2 million in judgments that found a detainee work program violated Washington's minimum wage law.

  • February 23, 2024

    Post-Conviction Relief Can't Save Immigrant From Removal

    A Kansas state court order vacating an immigrant's theft convictions was found insufficient to undo a deportation order, with the Board of Immigration Appeals saying Friday that the Kansas court hadn't provided a reason for walking back the convictions.

  • February 22, 2024

    Texas Developer Battles DOJ's 1st Predatory Mortgages Suit

    A Texas land developer is fighting back against a high-profile predatory lending lawsuit filed by the U.S. Department of Justice and Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, telling a Houston federal judge that the government's "reverse redlining" theory isn't legally sound and relies on sloppy loan comparisons.

  • February 22, 2024

    Feds Can't Keep Depositions In Family Separation Suit Private

    A California federal judge ruled Thursday that the U.S. government can't keep deposition transcripts private in a lawsuit by families separated at the border during the Trump administration, saying no harm would come from making them public.

  • February 22, 2024

    Judge Irked By Arbitration Ask Years Into Au Pair Wage Case

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Thursday twice lobbed the phrase "judge shopping" at lawyers for an au pair placement agency that, four years into a proposed collective wage action by former child care workers, now want the case sent to arbitration in Switzerland.

  • February 22, 2024

    SD Winery Gets New Go At Hiring Foreign Kitchen Staff

    A U.S. Department of Labor appeals board on Wednesday revived a South Dakota winery's quest to temporarily hire foreign kitchen staff for its tourist season, faulting a certifying officer for giving the winery only one way to fix a hiring date discrepancy.

  • February 22, 2024

    NY Judge Halts State Ag Law's Anti-Union Speech Restriction

    A New York federal judge paused enforcement of a section of a state agricultural labor law that would make it an unfair labor practice to discourage unionization, saying claims from a farming group that the provision violates the First Amendment have a chance of success.

  • February 22, 2024

    ICE's Immunity Bars Bulk Of Virus Death Suit, For Now

    U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has for now dodged most of a lawsuit over the death of a man who contracted COVID-19 in detention, after a California federal court ruled that sovereign immunity barred most of the case.

  • February 21, 2024

    9th Circ. Judge Slams DOJ 'About-Face' In Asylum Rule Case

    A split Ninth Circuit panel agreed Wednesday to pause the Biden administration's appeal of a lower court order vacating a rule limiting asylum, as a dissenting judge excoriated the government for trying to settle the case after forcefully defending the rule.

  • February 21, 2024

    4th Circ. Tosses Migrant Bond Co.'s CFPB Funding Challenge

    The Fourth Circuit on Wednesday dismissed an appeal from an immigrant bond service company being sued by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau for allegedly running a predatory scheme, finding that the court has no appellate jurisdiction over the litigation.

promo for immigration policy tracker that says tracking changes in immigration policy

Expert Analysis

  • 4 Business-Building Strategies For Introvert Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    Introverted lawyers can build client bases to rival their extroverted peers’ by adapting time-tested strategies for business development that can work for any personality — such as claiming a niche, networking for maximum impact, drawing on existing contacts and more, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • Employer Considerations For New I-9 Virtual Verification

    Author Photo

    A recently implemented Form I-9 option modernizes the process of employment eligibility verification by making pandemic-era virtual verification permanent, though employers will need to understand the option’s procedures and requirements to ensure compliance with all immigration laws, say attorneys at Littler.

  • Opinion

    3 Ways Justices' Disclosure Defenses Miss The Ethical Point

    Author Photo

    The rule-bound interpretation of financial disclosures preferred by U.S. Supreme Court Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas — demonstrated in their respective statements defending their failure to disclose gifts from billionaires — show that they do not understand the ethical aspects of the public's concern, says Jim Moliterno at the Washington and Lee University School of Law.

  • Canada's H-1B Policy Leverages U.S. Green Card Backlog

    Author Photo

    Canada’s new policy allowing U.S. H-1B visa holders and their families to relocate and seek work in Canada takes advantage of the backlog in U.S. green card processing, and other countries seeking highly skilled workers trained in the U.S. are likely to follow suit, says Sarah Hawk at Barnes & Thornburg.

  • Ch. 11 Ruling Sets New Standard For Using Reinstatement

    Author Photo

    A New York bankruptcy court’s recent ruling in Golden Seahorse, which concluded that Section 365(b)(2)(D) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code only creates a cure exception for nonmonetary defaults, sets a high bar for challenging the requirement to pay default interest as a condition to reinstatement of a loan agreement under a Chapter 11 plan, says Debra Dandeneau at Baker McKenzie.

  • Caregiver Flexibility Is Crucial For Atty Engagement, Retention

    Author Photo

    As the battle for top talent continues post-pandemic, many firms are attempting to attract employees with progressive hybrid working environments — and supporting caregivers before, during and after an extended leave is a critically important way to retain top talent, says Manar Morales at The Diversity & Flexibility Alliance.

  • In-Office Engagement Is Essential To Associate Development

    Author Photo

    As law firms develop return-to-office policies that allow hybrid work arrangements, they should incorporate the specific types of in-person engagement likely to help associates develop attributes common among successful firm leaders, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Trends Emerge In High Court's Criminal Law Decisions

    Author Photo

    In its 2022-2023 term, the U.S. Supreme Court issued nine merits decisions in criminal cases covering a wide range of issues, and while each decision is independently important, when viewed together, key trends and takeaways appear that will affect defendants moving forward, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

  • Perspectives

    A Judge's Pitch To Revive The Jury Trial

    Author Photo

    Ohio state Judge Pierre Bergeron explains how the decline of the jury trial threatens public confidence in the judiciary and even democracy as a whole, and he offers ideas to restore this sacred right.

  • How To Recognize And Recover From Lawyer Loneliness

    Author Photo

    Law can be one of the loneliest professions, but there are practical steps that attorneys and their managers can take to help themselves and their peers improve their emotional health, strengthen their social bonds and protect their performance, says psychologist and attorney Traci Cipriano.

  • Opinion

    Litigation Funding Disclosure Should Be Mandatory

    Author Photo

    Despite the Appellate Rules Committee's recent deferral of the issue of requiring third-party litigation funding disclosure, such a mandate is necessary to ensure the even-handed administration of justice across all cases, says David Levitt at Hinshaw.

  • Recalling USWNT's Legal PR Playbook Amid World Cup Bid

    Author Photo

    As the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team strives to take home another World Cup trophy, their 2022 pay equity settlement with the U.S. Soccer Federation serves as a good reminder that winning in the court of public opinion can be more powerful than a victory inside the courtroom, says Hector Valle at Vianovo.

  • Potential Outcomes After E Visa Processing Update

    Author Photo

    A recent update to the Foreign Affairs Manual’s E visa provisions may help ease consular backlogs, but a policy change that will require some applicants and their family members to process renewals overseas at different times creates new administrative burdens for practitioners, say Anna Morzy and Elizabeth Przybysz at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Immigration Program Pitfalls Exacerbate Physician Shortages

    Author Photo

    Eliminating shortcomings from U.S. immigration regulations and policies could help mitigate the national shortage of physicians by encouraging foreign physicians to work in medically underserved areas, but progress has been halted by partisan gridlock, say Alison Hitz and Dana Schwarz at Clark Hill.

  • Perspectives

    Mallory Gives Plaintiffs A Better Shot At Justice

    Author Photo

    Critics of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern claim it opens the door to litigation tourism, but the ruling simply gives plaintiffs more options — enabling them to seek justice against major corporations in the best possible court, say Rayna Kessler and Ethan Seidenberg at Robins Kaplan.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Immigration archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!