International Arbitration

  • February 07, 2024

    Longford Argues Patent Settlement Row Must Be Arbitrated

    Litigation funder Longford Capital has asked a Delaware federal court to send its dispute over a settlement with Arigna Technology Ltd. to arbitration, saying the arbitration agreement between the two parties is valid despite the Irish patent holding company's claims otherwise.

  • February 07, 2024

    Forbes Distributor Says Mexican Court Order Must Stand

    A distributor of Forbes magazine in Latin America is urging a New York court to nix the media company's bid to overturn a Mexican court injunction barring it from terminating their deal while the companies arbitrate a renewal dispute, saying the request is improper.

  • February 07, 2024

    Fieldfisher Hires Arbitration Pro For New Amsterdam Practice

    Fieldfisher LLP has recruited a dispute resolution specialist from Pogust Goodhead to spearhead a new international arbitration practice it has launched in Amsterdam, as it continues to build out its disputes offering across Europe.

  • February 06, 2024

    9th Circ. Won't Review $1.3B India Award Fight

    The Ninth Circuit on Tuesday refused to revisit its decision overturning the enforcement of a $1.3 billion arbitral award issued to an Indian satellite communications company on jurisdictional grounds, despite a scathing dissent from several judges criticizing the appellate court's outlier position on the relevant issue.

  • February 07, 2024

    CORRECTED: 9th Circ. Nixes Mexican Movie Co.'s Award Challenge

    The Ninth Circuit has agreed with a lower court's enforcement of an arbitral award against a Mexican motion picture distributor in a case involving a California film production company's right to distribute in Latin America the movie "Ava" starring Jessica Chastain. Correction: A previous version of this article's headline has been corrected.

  • February 06, 2024

    2nd Circ. Won't Nix Award In Telecom Shareholder Fight

    The Second Circuit affirmed an arbitration award ordering the sale of a Latin American telecommunications tower after telling the contesting shareholders during oral argument it sounded like they had "buyer's remorse" about choosing arbitration.

  • February 06, 2024

    11th Circ. OKs Big Lots Widow's $9.6M Win Against Grandsons

    The two grandsons of the Big Lots founder's widow owe her estate $9.6 million for mismanaging her fortune, an Eleventh Circuit panel ruled Tuesday, refusing to overturn an arbitration tribunal award after finding that its chairperson had no conflict of interest and that a virtual final hearing was appropriate in the case.

  • February 06, 2024

    Wimbledon Champ's Doping Ban Appeal Starts Wednesday

    The doping ban appeal of Romanian professional tennis player Simona Halep will begin on Wednesday and is expected to wrap up by the end of the week, the Court of Arbitration for Sport said Tuesday.

  • February 05, 2024

    Sony Gets No Relief From Emergency Arbitrator In Nixed Deal

    The Singapore International Arbitration Center has denied Sony's bid for emergency relief to prevent Zee Entertainment Enterprises Ltd. from initiating legal action to contest a decision by the Japanese company's Indian unit to terminate their $10 billion merger, Zee said.

  • February 05, 2024

    Justices Urged To Turn Away $392M Arbitrator Bias Suit

    An oil company has urged the U.S. Supreme Court to deny a petition asking it to overturn the Second Circuit standard for vacating arbitral awards over apparent arbitrator bias, arguing that any differences in the federal appeals courts over the evident partiality standard are "academic."

  • February 05, 2024

    US Backs Spain In $386M Solar Award Cases

    The Biden administration is urging the D.C. Circuit not to enforce some $386 million in arbitral awards issued to investors after Spain dialed back its renewable energy incentives, arguing that courts need not defer to arbitrators when deciding whether an arbitration agreement exists.

  • February 02, 2024

    Ukraine Suffers Setback In Russia Genocide Case

    The International Court of Justice on Friday tossed a significant portion of the case Ukraine filed against Russia following the events of February 2022 on jurisdictional grounds, saying it cannot decide whether Moscow's invasion violated a decades-old anti-genocide treaty.

  • February 02, 2024

    Hemp Co. Founder Says Court Should Uphold $1.7M Win

    A cannabis entrepreneur has urged a federal judge in Manhattan to reject Neptune Wellness Solutions Inc.'s "frivolous" bid to "re-litigate" an arbitration award of $1.7 million in attorney fees and expenses, saying the arbitrator didn't need to follow New York law.

  • February 02, 2024

    Judge Tosses Involuntary Releases In Amyris Ch. 11 Plan

    A Delaware bankruptcy judge on Friday struck down biotechnology company Amyris Inc.'s plan to shield executives and others from liability using nonconsensual releases as part of its Chapter 11 plan, finding that Amyris can reorganize without relying on the controversial mechanism.

  • February 02, 2024

    Off The Bench: NIL In Court, $3B Golf Deal, Angelos Sells O's

    In this week's Off The Bench, the NCAA's legal woes mount as two states lob antitrust claims against its name, image and likeness payment rules, the PGA Tour secures a $3 billion investment as talks with LIV Golf trudge on, and the Angelos family sells its stake in the Baltimore Orioles.

  • February 02, 2024

    Gazprom Subsidiary Told To Halt Claim Proceedings In Russia

    A London appeals court on Friday granted an anti-suit injunction against a Gazprom joint venture, putting a halt to its €450 million ($488 million) claim in the Russian courts against UniCredit Bank AG for allegedly refusing to pay out under seven bond contracts.

  • February 02, 2024

    Holiday Inn Owner, Insurers Settle Suit Over $11M Ida Award

    A New Orleans Holiday Inn owner asked a Louisiana federal court to permanently dismiss its suit against three insurers over an $11.4 million arbitration award and related bad faith claims after the parties reached a settlement in January.

  • February 02, 2024

    Cozen O'Connor Adds Rivero Mestre Business Litigator In NY

    Cozen O'Connor has hired a Rivero Mestre LLP international business litigator who focuses his practice on cross-border business disputes originating in Latin America to the firm's New York City-based commercial litigation group.

  • February 01, 2024

    175 Biz Groups Lobby WTO To Keep Block On Digital Duties

    The World Trade Organization should renew a decades-old suspension of tariffs on electronic commissions at its upcoming Ministerial Conference to ensure a future of innovation and resiliency, 175 business associations from around the world told the WTO in a statement.

  • February 01, 2024

    Oil Price Cap Coalition Outlines Top Evasion Tactics

    The countries behind the Russian oil price cap, or OPC, issued new guidance Thursday outlining the primary tactics used to evade the $60 per barrel limit, including the increasing use of byzantine corporate structures to hide prohibited transactions.

  • February 01, 2024

    Mexico Can't Confirm US Labor Claims At Fujikura Auto Plant

    Investigators from Mexico's Ministry of Labor and Ministry of Economy said Wednesday they can't verify U.S.-backed claims of labor rights violations and discrimination against former union organizers at an automotive plant in Piedras Negras, Coahuila.

  • February 01, 2024

    Former Gov. Of Puerto Rico Joins Reed Smith From Steptoe

    Reed Smith LLP announced Thursday that it has hired two partners to its Washington, D.C., and New York offices, including a former governor of Puerto Rico.

  • February 01, 2024

    Spain Doesn't Have To Pay Upfront In €120M Energy Row

    An appeals court said Thursday it had found "no compelling reason" to make Spain's challenge to a €120 million ($130 million) arbitral award for slashing economic incentives for renewable energy investors conditional on the state paying the full amount upfront.

  • January 31, 2024

    Worker-Centered Trade Faces Headwinds From Lawmakers

    President Joe Biden's goal to recalibrate international trade to support middle-class jobs is facing headwinds following a series of trade negotiation setbacks, an exodus of high-level staffers, and now a congressional threat to his nomination of a deputy trade representative.

  • January 31, 2024

    11th Circ. Skeptical Of Bid To Nix Retail Heiress's Award

    The Eleventh Circuit appeared disinclined on Wednesday to vacate an arbitral award finding the grandsons of a retail store heiress liable for mismanaging her $70 million fortune based on the tribunal chair's failure to disclose a lawsuit she filed against State Farm, which had recently hired one of the grandsons.

Expert Analysis

  • Perspectives

    More States Should Join Effort To Close Legal Services Gap

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    Colorado is the most recent state to allow other types of legal providers, not just attorneys, to offer specific services in certain circumstances — and more states should rethink the century-old assumptions that shape our current regulatory rules, say Natalie Anne Knowlton and Janet Drobinske at the University of Denver.

  • Identifying Trends And Tips In Litigation Financing Disclosure

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    Growing interest and controversy in litigation financing raise several salient concerns, but exploring recent compelled disclosure trends from courts around the country can help practitioners further their clients' interests, say Sean Callagy and Samuel Sokolsky at Arnold & Porter.

  • Opinion

    OFAC Designation Prosecutions Are Constitutionally Suspect

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    Criminal prosecutions based on the Office of Foreign Assets Control’s sanctions-related listing decisions — made with nearly unfettered discretion through an opaque process — present several constitutional issues, so it is imperative that courts recognize additional rights of review, say Solomon Shinerock and Annika Conrad at Lewis Baach.

  • 9th Circ. Ruling Shows Int'l Arbitration Jurisdictional Snags

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    While the Ninth Circuit sidestepped the thorny and undecided constitutional question of whether a foreign state is a person for the purposes of a due process analysis, its Devas v. Antrix opinion provides important guidance to parties seeking to enforce an arbitration award against a foreign sovereign in the U.S., say attorneys at Wiley.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Elrod On 'Jury Duty'

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    Though the mockumentary series “Jury Duty” features purposely outrageous characters, it offers a solemn lesson about the simple but brilliant design of the right to trial by jury, with an unwitting protagonist who even John Adams may have welcomed as an impartial foreperson, says Fifth Circuit Judge Jennifer Elrod.

  • Contract Disputes Recap: Nonmonetary Claims, Timeliness

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    Bret Marfut and Stephanie Magnell at Seyfarth look at recent decisions from the U.S. Civilian Board of Contract Appeals, the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals and the U.S. Court of Federal Claims that shed light on the jurisdictional contours of the Contract Disputes Act and provide useful guidance on timely filings and jurisdiction over nonmonetary claims.

  • 4 Business-Building Strategies For Introvert Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Introverted lawyers can build client bases to rival their extroverted peers’ by adapting time-tested strategies for business development that can work for any personality — such as claiming a niche, networking for maximum impact, drawing on existing contacts and more, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • Opinion

    3 Ways Justices' Disclosure Defenses Miss The Ethical Point

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    The rule-bound interpretation of financial disclosures preferred by U.S. Supreme Court Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas — demonstrated in their respective statements defending their failure to disclose gifts from billionaires — show that they do not understand the ethical aspects of the public's concern, says Jim Moliterno at the Washington and Lee University School of Law.

  • How US Investment Regulation May Shift Under Biden Order

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    Attorneys at Ropes & Gray explore potential prohibitions, notification requirements and covered transactions under President Joe Biden's recent executive order, which marks an unprecedented expansion of U.S. regulation of investment activity.

  • Where Biden's Outbound Investment Effort May Be Headed

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    The president’s recent executive order on outbound investment describes prohibited transactions and a notification process, but the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s actions suggest upcoming regulations will leave investors with the risky determination of whether investments are prohibited or require notification, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Caregiver Flexibility Is Crucial For Atty Engagement, Retention

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    As the battle for top talent continues post-pandemic, many firms are attempting to attract employees with progressive hybrid working environments — and supporting caregivers before, during and after an extended leave is a critically important way to retain top talent, says Manar Morales at The Diversity & Flexibility Alliance.

  • In-Office Engagement Is Essential To Associate Development

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    As law firms develop return-to-office policies that allow hybrid work arrangements, they should incorporate the specific types of in-person engagement likely to help associates develop attributes common among successful firm leaders, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Trends Emerge In High Court's Criminal Law Decisions

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    In its 2022-2023 term, the U.S. Supreme Court issued nine merits decisions in criminal cases covering a wide range of issues, and while each decision is independently important, when viewed together, key trends and takeaways appear that will affect defendants moving forward, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

  • Perspectives

    A Judge's Pitch To Revive The Jury Trial

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    Ohio state Judge Pierre Bergeron explains how the decline of the jury trial threatens public confidence in the judiciary and even democracy as a whole, and he offers ideas to restore this sacred right.

  • It All Comes Down To Choice Of Law In Nazi-Looted Art Case

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    The Ninth Circuit's recent decision in a nearly 20-year ownership battle over a Nazi-looted painting shows the court lacked adequate guidance on how California's choice-of-law rule should be applied to stolen property and that the choice of law — between California or Spain — will likely determine whose claim to the painting prevails, says Kevin Ray at Greenberg Traurig.

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